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I 11 



GRADUATE STUDY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO CIRCLE 1971-1972 





CHICAGO CIRCLE 

BULLETIN 



Graduate Study 



The University of Illinois 

at 

Chicago Circle 



1971 - 1972 



CHICAGO CIRCLE BULLETIN 

Volume 6 Number 4 August 15, 1971 

Published by the University of Illinois Office of 
Publications, 2631 University Hall, 601 S. Morgan, Chicago, 
Illinois 60607. Issued monthly as follows: once in January, 
February, March, July, August, November, and December; 
twice in May and June; three times in April and October; 
four times in September. Application to mail at 
second-class postage rates is pending at Chicago, Illinois. 



Contents 



Academic Calendar 4 

Board of Trustees 8 

Administrative Officers 9 

Departments Offering Graduate Work 11 

Campus History and Information 15 

Academic and General Regulations 20 

Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges 27 

Assistantships, Fellowships, and Financial Aid 33 

Campus Facilities and Student Services 39 

The Departments 44 

Additional Courses for Graduate Credit 170 

Additional Faculty of the Graduate College 210 

Index 214 



Calendar of the Graduate College 



1971-1972 

Fall Quarter, 1971 

September 20-24 (Monday- Friday) 

September 27 (Monday) 

October 1 (Friday) 

October 25 (Monday) 

October 29 (Friday) 



November 5 (Friday) 



November 19 (Friday) 



November 25-26 (Thursday, Friday) 
December 3 (Friday) 
December 6-10 (Monday- Friday) 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Veterans Day (no classes) 

Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of Ph.D. theses for fall 

quarter 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day to submit titles of master's 

theses 
Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of master's theses for fall 

quarter 
Last day for addition of names to the 

fall quarter graduation list 
Thanksgiving vacation 
Instruction ends 
Final examinations 



Winter Quarter, 1972 

December 13-17 (Monday- Friday) 

January 3 (Monday) 

January 7 (Friday) 

January 28 (Friday) 

February 4 (Friday) 



February 7 (Monday) 
February 11 (Friday) 
February 18 (Friday) 



February 25 (Friday) 

March 10 (Friday) 

March 13-17 (Monday-Friday) 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Last day to submit titles of master's 

theses 
Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of Ph.D. theses for winter 

quarter 
Lincoln Day (no classes) 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of master's theses for 

winter quarter 
Last day for addition of names to winter 

quarter graduation list 
Instruction ends 
Final examinations 



Spring Quarter, 1972 

March 20-24 (Monday -Friday) 

March 27 (Monday) 

March 30 (Thursday) 

March 31 (Friday) 

April 7 (Friday) 

April 21 (Friday) 

April 28 (Friday) 



May 5 (Friday) 
May 12 (Friday) 



May 29 (Monday) 

May 30 (Tuesday) 

June 2 (Friday) 

June 5-9 (Monday- Friday) 

June 18 (Sunday) 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Good Friday (no classes) 

Last day for addition of names to the 

spring quarter graduation list 
Last day to submit titles of master's 

theses 
Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of Ph.D. theses for spring 

quarter 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of master's theses for 

spring quarter 
Memorial Day (no classes) 
Memorial Day (classes will be held) 
Instruction ends 
Final examinations 
Commencement 



Summer Quarter, 1972 
June 12-16 (Monday- Friday) 
June 19 (Monday) 
June 23 (Friday) 
July 4 (Tuesday) 
July 14 (Friday) 

July 21 (Friday) 



July 28 (Friday) 



August 7 (Monday) 

August 25 (Friday) 
August 28-September 1 
(Monday- Friday) 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Independence Day (no classes) 

Last day to submit titles of master's 

theses 
Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of Ph.D. theses for summer 

quarter 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of master's theses for 

summer quarter 
Last day for addition of names to the 

summer quarter graduation list 
Instruction ends 

Final examinations 



1972-1973 

Fall Quarter, 1972 

September 1-22 (Monday-Friday) 
September 25 (Monday) 
September 29 (Friday) 
October 23 (Monday) 
October 27 (Friday) 

November 3 (Friday) 

November 17 (Friday) 



November 23-23 (Thursday-Friday) 
December 1 (Friday) 
December 6-8 (Monday-Friday) 

Winter Quarter, 1973 

December 11-15 (Monday-Friday) 
January 2 (Tuesday) 
January 5 (Friday) 
January 26 (Friday) 
February 2 (Friday) 

February 5 (Monday) 
February 9 (Friday) 
February 16 (Friday) 

February 23 (Friday) 

March 9 (Friday) 

March 12-16 (Monday-Friday) 

Spring Quarter, 1973 

March 19-23 (Monday-Friday) 
March 26 (Monday) 
March 30 (Thursday) 
April 6 (Friday) 

April 19 (Thursday) 
April 20 (Friday) 
April 27 (Friday) 

May 4 (Friday) 
May 1 1 (Friday) 

May 2 (Monday) 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Veterans Day (no classes) 

Last day for Graduate College format 

approval of Ph.D. theses for fall quarter 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day to submit titles of masters theses 
Last day for Graduate College format appr 

of master's theses for fall quarter 
Last day for addition of names to the fall 

quarter graduation list 
Thanksgiving vacation 
Instruction ends 
Final examinations 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Last day to submit titles of masters theses 

Last day for Graduate College format appn 

of Ph.D. theses for winter quarter 
Lincoln Day (no classes) 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day for Graduate College format appn 

of master's theses for winter quarter 
Last day for addition of names to winter qi 

graduation list 
Instruction ends 
Final examinations 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Last day for addition of names to the spring 

quarter graduation list 
Last day to submit titles of master's theses 
Good Friday (no classes) 
Last day for Graduate College format appro 

of Ph.D. theses for spring quarter 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day for Graduate College format appro 

of masters theses for spring quarter 
Memorial Day (no classes) 



6 



June 1 (Friday) 

June 4-8 (Monday- Friday) 

June 17 (Sunday) 

Summer Quarter, 1973 

June 11-15 (Monday-Friday) 

June 18 (Monday) 

June 22 (Friday) 

July 4 (Wednesday) 

July 13 (Friday) 

July 20 (Friday) 

July 27 (Friday) 



August 6 (Monday) 

August 24 (Friday) 

August 27-31 (Monday-Friday) 



Instruction ends 
Final examinations 
Commencement 



Registration week 

Instruction begins 

Last day to submit titles of Ph.D. theses 

Independence Day (no classes) 

Last day to submit titles of master's theses 

Last day for Graduate College format approval 

of Ph.D. theses for summer quarter 
Last day to drop a course 
Last day for Graduate College format approval 

of master's theses for summer quarter 
Last day for addition of names to the summer 

quarter graduation list 
Instruction ends 
Final examinations 



The Board of Trustees 

of the University of Illinois 



Members Ex Officio 

Richard B. Ogilvie, Governor of Illinois Springfield 62706 

Michael J. Bakalis, Superintendent of Public Instruction . .Springfield 62706 



Elected Members 

1967-1973 

Donald R. Grimes 1618 Orrington Avenue, Evanston 60201 

Ralph C. Hahn 1320 South State Street, Springfield 62704 

Roger B. Pogue 705 N. Oakland Avenue, Decatur 61801 

1969-1975 

Earl M. Hughes 206 N. Hughes Road, Woodstock 60089 

Russell W. Steger 135 S. LaSalle Street, Chicago 60603 

Timothy W. Swain 411 Hamilton Boulevard, Peoria 61602 

1971-1977 

William D. Forsythe, Jr 425 V6 E. Washington Street, Springfield 62701 

George W. Howard III Howard Building, Box U, Mt. Vernon 62864 

Earl Langdon Neal . . Ill W. Washington Street, Suite 1525, Chicago 60602 

Officers of the Board 

Earl M. Hughes, President Woodstock 

Earl W. Porter, Secretary Urbana 

Robert R. Manchester, Treasurer Chicago 

Herbert O. Farber, Comptroller Urbana 



Administrative Officers 



General University 

President John E. Corbally, Jr. 

Executive Vice President and Provost Lyle H. Lanier 

Vice President and Comptroller Herbert O. Farber 

Vice President Eldon L. Johnson 

Secretary Earl W. Porter 

Director, University Office of School and 

College Relations E. Eugene Oliver 

Dean, University Extension Stanley C. Robinson 

University Counsel , James J. Costello 

Director, Nonacademic Personnel Oscar S. Smith 

Director, Physical Plant Planning and 

Construction 

Director, Public Information Charles E. Flynn 

Executive Director, Alumni Association James Vermette 

Executive Director, University of 

Illinois Foundation Joseph W. Skehen 



Chicago Circle 

Chancellor Warren B. Cheston 

Vice Chancellor and Dean of Faculties Daniel C. McCluney, Jr. 

Assistant Chancellor Robert P. Bentz 

Dean of Student Affairs Oscar Miller 

Associate Administrative Dean Harold N. Cooley 

Dean, College of Architecture and Art Leonard J. Currie 

Dean, College of Business Administration Irvin L. Heckmann 

Dean, College of Education Van Cleve Morris 

Director, School of Physical Education Sheldon L. Fordham 

Dean, College of Engineering George Bugliarello 

Dean, Graduate College Jan Rocek 

Associate Dean H. Fred Koeper 

Associate Dean William J. Otting 

Assistant Dean John A. Nicolette 

Assistant to the Dean Otis Dante 

Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean B. Doner 

Associate Director, Jane Addams 
Graduate School of Social Work George W. Magner 

9 



University Librarian William B. Ernst 

Director, Business Affairs James E. Osborn 

Legal Counsel (Campus) James E. Harmon 

Director, Admissions and Records William C. Price 

Director, University Honors Programs Samuel Schrage 

Director, Personnel Services Leroy J. Votava 

Director, Physical Plant, Chicago Campuses Frank W. Houck 

Director, Auxiliary Sendees James J. Overlock 

Director, Public Information, Chicago Circle Grover E. Shipton 

Director, Chicago Circle Center Dale Brostrom 

Commandant, R.O.T.C Lt. Col. John A. Hettinger, Jr. 



10 



Departments Offering Graduate Work 



Anthropology: M.A. 

Robert L. Hall, Chairman 

3102 Behavioral Sciences Building 

Bio engineering: M.S. (See Informa- 
tion Engineering) 

Burt Zuber, Acting Head 

1128 Science and Engineering Offices 

Biological Sciences: M.S. 

Elmer B. Hadley, Head 

3236 Science and Engineering South 

Chemistry: M.S., Ph.D. 
Specializations in organic, inor- 
ganic, and physical chemistry. 

William F. Sager, Head 

408 Science and Engineering South 

Energy Engineering: M.S. 
Specializations in continuum and 
molecular fluid mechanics, heat and 
mass transfer, and macroscopic and 
microscopic thermodynamics. 

James P. Hartnett, Head 

912 Science and Engineering Offices 

The Ph.D. in Solids and Fluids is 
offered jointly by the Energy Engi- 
neering and Materials Engineering 
Departments. Specializations are 
offered in continuum mechanics, 
gas dynamics, heat transfer, metal- 
lurgy, plasma dynamics, soil engi- 
neering, and structures. 



English: M.A. 

M.A. in English with a specializa- 
tion in literature and creative wri- 
ting. 
M.A. in Linguistics. 

John C. Johnson, Head 
2333 University Hall 

Geological Sciences: M.S. 
Specializations in crystallography, 
mineralogy, petrology, and geo- 
chemistry; paleontology, oceanog- 
raphy, sedimentology, and sedimen- 
tary geochemistry. 

Werner H. Baur, Head 

2460 Science and Engineering South 

German: M.A. 

Specializations in German litera- 
ture; German philology and linguis- 
tics. 

Robert R. Heitner, Head 
1605 Universitv Hall 

History: M.A., Ph.D. 
Ph.D. specializations in Early Eu- 
rope and Modern Europe, and Brit- 
ish, Russian, French, Italian, and 
American history. M.A. specializa- 
tions in ancient world, medieval 
Europe, early modern Europe, 
Russia, Great Britain, America 
(United States), Africa, imperialism 
and colonialism, and historiog- 
raphy. 

Edward G. Thaden, Chairman 
1932 University Hall 



11 



Information Engineering: M.S. 
Specializations in information engi- 
neering and bioengineering. 

1112 Science and Engineering Offices 

Materials Engineering: M.S. 
Specializations in metallurgy, soil 
mechanics and foundations, struc- 
tures (including concrete technol- 
ogy), engineering mechanics. 

Ernest F. Masur, Head 

816 Science and Engineering Offices 

Mathematics: M.A., M.S., M.S. in 
Teaching of Mathematics, Ph.D. 

Joseph Landin, Head 

322 Science and Engineering Offices 

Philosophy: M.A., Ph.D. 
1803 University Hall 

Physics: M.S., Ph.D. 
Specializations in atomic and mo- 
lecular physics, high energy physics, 
nuclear physics, solid state physics, 
theoretical physics. 

Swaminatha Sundaram, Head 

2244 Science and Engineering South 

Political Science: M.A. 
Specializations in American govern- 
ment, public administration. 

Richard M. Johnson, Head 

1102 Behavioral Sciences Building 



Psychology: M.A., Ph.D. 

Harry S. Upshaw, Head 

1008 A Behavioral Sciences Building 

Social Work: M.S.W. 
There is also a joint program with 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 
For details, write directly to the 
School of Social Work. 

George W. Magner, Associate Director 
1322 University Hall 

Sociology: M.A., Ph.D. 
Specializations in urban institutions 
and social psychology. 

Robert L. Hall, Head 

4118 Behavioral Sciences Building 

Speech and Theater: M.A. 
Specializations in communication 
and public address and theater. 

R. Victor Harnack, Head 

4022 Behavioral Sciences Building 

Graduate courses are offered in 
some departments that do not yet 
offer a degree program; they are 
available to all graduate students on 
an elective basis. 

For additional information about 
programs listed in this catalog, cor- 
respond directly with the appro- 
priate department at the listed 
address. 



Graduate College 

1523 University Hall 

University of Illinois at Chicago Circle 

Box 4348, Chicago, Illinois 60680 



12 



Executive Committee of the Graduate College 

Jan Rocek, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate College; Professor of Chemistry 

Maurice J. Eash, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

Brian Gluss, Ph.D., Professor of Quantitative Methods 

Elmer B. Hadley, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Sciences 

Noboru Ito, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

Richard M. Johnson, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 

John W.Johnstone, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology 

Howard F. Koeper, Ph.D., Professor of History of Architecture and Art 

Jay A. Levine, Ph.D., Professor of English 

Nicholas Moravcevich, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Literature 

Chathilingath K. Sanathanan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Information 

Engineering 
Paul W. Simon, M.S.S.A., Professor of Social Work 
Edward C. Thaden, Ph.D., Professor of History 

Otto E. Widera, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics 
Robert S. Wyer, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology 



13 



Campus History and Information 



The University of Illinois at Chicago Circle was activated in 1965, not as a 
new institution but as the successor to the Chicago Undergraduate Division, 
through which the University of Illinois for 19 years provided the first two 
years of college and preprofessional work for over 100,000 commuting 
college students of the Chicago area. 

In the spring of 1946 the University realized that men and women from 
the Armed Services could not be admitted to the main campus at 
Champaign-Urbana because it was impossible to construct additional facilities 
in time to meet the demand. Restricting enrollment was undesirable; 
therefore, Navy Pier, already used as a school and adaptable to the needs of a 
freshman-sophomore program, was leased by the Board of Trustees to 
organize the Chicago Undergraduate Division. That fall, 3800 students, 
three-fourths of them veterans, were enrolled. Although the percentage of 
veterans dropped slightly in 1947, enrollment rose above 4500. 

In January, 1961, the Board of Trustees approved the granting of 
baccalaureate degrees by the Chicago Undergraduate Division as soon as an 
adequate campus was available: the site, where the Eisenhower, Ryan, and 
Kennedy Expressways converge, was selected in 1961, the Chicago Under- 
graduate Division became the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, and the 
campus was occupied on February 22, 1965. 

The first thirteen graduate programs were established in September, 1967. 
At the beginning of the 1971-1972 academic year the University of Illinois at 
Chicago Circle offers master's degrees in eighteen fields and doctor's degrees 
in eight. 

Other University of Illinois facilities in Chicago are at the Medical Center, 
which houses the Colleges of Medicine (including the School of Associated 
Medical Sciences), Dentistry, Nursing, and Pharmacy and the Health Sciences 
Division of the Graduate College. 



Location and Transportation 

The Chicago Circle campus is located just south and west of the Loop in 
an area bounded by the Eisenhower and Ryan Expressways, Racine Avenue, 



16 CAMPUS HISTORY AND INFORMATION 



and Roosevelt Road. The mailing address is Box 4348, Chicago, Illinois 
60680. Transportation to the campus is by way of the CTA, which has built a 
station at Peoria Street especially to serve Chicago Circle, and by the buses on 
Halsted, Harrison, and Taylor Streets and on Roosevelt Road. 



Admission 

The academic year at Chicago Circle consists of three 11 -week quarters 
(including the final examination periods) that begin in September (fall 
quarter), January (winter quarter), and March (spring quarter). The 11-week 
summer quarter begins in June. A student may seek admission to any one of 
the four quarters; however, the scheduling in many departments makes it 
desirable that students enter in the fall quarter. 

The minimum requirements for admission to the Graduate College are: 
1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 
.2. Recommendation for admission by the department to which applica- 
tion is made and by the Dean of the Graduate College. 
3. A cumulative grade-point average of 3.500 (A=5.000), which is 
computed on the last 90 quarter hours (60 semester hours) of 
undergraduate work. An applicant for post-master's work and a 
doctoral candidate who has earned a master's degree or has completed 
at least 48 quarter hours (32 semester hours) of graduate study at an 
accredited institution are also considered for admission on the 
cumulative grade-point average for the graduate work completed. 
Some departments have adopted requirements higher than the minimum. 
For specific department requirements for the average required, the comple- 
tion of the Graduate Record Examination, required undergraduate subjects, 
and additional information, consult the appropriate section of this catalog. 

The Graduate College may, when space permits, recommend the 
admission of an unassigned student so that specific educational goals of 
individuals may be realized. For the same reason, after consultation with the 
department concerned, the Graduate College may recommend the admission 
of a student on a non-degree status. Such admission does not commit the 
University for more than one quarter at a time nor is any commitment 
implied that any non-degree or unassigned student will be accepted into a 
degree program at a later date. Credit earned as a non-degree or unassigned 
student may be counted toward a degree only with the express consent of the 
department and the Dean of the Graduate College. 



Graduate Study by Seniors at the University of Illinois 
at Chicago Circle 

Upon recommendation of the department, an undergraduate student may 
be given graduate credit for graduate courses taken in his senior year. 
However, these courses may not be applied toward the baccalaureate degree. 



CAMPUS HISTORY AND INFORMATION 17 



Application Procedures 

Applications for admission may be obtained from the Office of 
Admissions and Records, the departments, or the Graduate College Office 
(see page 11). A prospective student should apply for admission at least two 
months before the beginning of the quarter in which he wishes to enroll. All 
applications must be accompanied by the nonrefundable application fee of 
$15. Applications will be reviewed only when all official transcripts and other 
required credentials have been received by the Office of Admissions and 
Records and forwarded to the appropriate department. 



Foreign Applicants 

Persons who have completed their studies outside the United States must 
present all post-secondary school credentials. Such credentials must include a 
record of all studies completed to date, grades or examination results received 
(including failing as well as passing grades), maximum and minimum grades 
obtainable in the school, rank in class, degrees, diplomas, and certificates 
earned, and length of the school year. Documents must be authentic or 
certified, and those not written in English must be accompanied by certified 
English translations. 

Applicants whose native language is not English will be required to take 
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (administered by the Educational 
Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, New Jersey 80540). 

All foreign applicants who plan to finance their study at the University of 
Illinois from personal resources must certify that they will have sufficient 
funds to cover their expenses. Obtain the appropriate form from the Office of 
Admissions and Records. 

Foreign students granted admission will receive from the Office of 
Admissions and Records all appropriate documents, including the certifica- 
tion forms that are used in applying for visas to enter the United States. 



Application Deadlines 

There is no official deadline for graduate applications. However, the 
number of graduate students who can be admitted is limited and applications 
are processed in the order in which they are received. Admission considera- 
tion will cease when capacities are reached; therefore, it is in the best interest 
of the applicant to submit his application and supporting credentials as early 
as possible. 



18 CAMPUS HISTORY AND INFORMATION 



Readmission 



A student who did not complete in the Graduate College the quarter 
immediately preceding the one in which he wishes to enroll, and who had not 
received approval for Off-Quarter Vacation or Leave of Absence, must submit 
an application for readmission. This rule does not apply to a student 
registering for the fall quarter if he was registered during the spring quarter. 
Such applications should be submitted no later than two weeks before the 
beginning of the quarter to which readmission is sought and must be 
accompanied by the $15 nonrefundable application fee. 



Nonrefundable Deposit 

A nonrefundable deposit of $30 is required of all applicants approved for 
admission or readmission to a fall quarter. The deposit should not be sent 
until it is requested by the Office of Admissions and Records; it is applied 
toward tuition for the first quarter in which the student enrolls. Graduate 
students assured of the award of a fellowship, assistantship, or tuition-and-fee 
waiver are exempt from paying this deposit. 



Registration 

Newly admitted and readmitted graduate students are sent a Permit to 
Enter and complete registration instructions. Registration may not be 
completed without the Permit to Enter. Students admitted to the University 
of Illinois for the first time are required to take a medical examination 
prescribed by the University Health Service. This examination must be 
administered by the student's physician at the student's expense. Instructions 
and required forms are mailed by the University after admission approval. 



Leave of Absence 

A Graduate College student may be granted a leave of absence for not 
more than four quarters. Such leave of absence must be approved by the 
Dean of the Graduate College prior to the end of the quarter before the leave 
is requested. Petition forms are available in the department and Graduate 
College offices. Approved petitions will be filed with the Office of 
Admissions and Records, which will mail instructions and registration 
materials for the quarter in which the student-on-leave is expected to enroll. 



CAMPUS HISTORY AND INFORMATION 19 



Off-Quarter Vacations 

A student may elect to attend any three quarters in one calendar year. If 
he chooses to use a quarter other than the summer as his vacation or Off 
Quarter, he must file an application with the Office of Admissions and 
Records before the first day of instruction of the quarter he wishes to use as 
vacation. Application blanks are available in that office. If the vacation 
quarter is other than the summer quarter, the student must attend the 
summer quarter of that calendar year if he wishes to retain his status as a 
continuing student. 

The student approved for an Off-Quarter Vacation is entitled to the same 
privileges as continuing students. He may make arrangements with the 
Insurance Office to carry his hospital-medical-surgical insurance, and he may 
advance enroll. Registration cards and information are mailed to him by the 
Office of Admissions and Records. 



Academic and General Regulations 



A student should familiarize himself with the academic requirements and 
regulations of the Graduate College and of the department in which he is 
working. He is responsible for complying with these regulations and for 
fulfilling all requirements for his particular degree. Every graduate student 
should have a Graduate College catalog and, if available, a department 
brochure, for they are official statements of policy. The usual procedures and 
requirements of the Graduate College are indicated in this catalog. 



Petitions 

A student may petition the Dean of the Graduate College for exceptions 
to any of the following regulations, but he should do so only after 
consultation with his adviser and the department coordinator of graduate 
studies. Forms for such petitions may be secured from the Graduate College. 



Work Completed Elsewhere 

Unless the department specifies otherwise at the time of admission a 
doctoral candidate who has received a master's degree from an accredited 
institution will receive 48 quarter hours of credit toward the minimal 144 
quarter-hour requirement for the doctoral degree; a petition is not required. 
A student who has completed, in an accredited institution, graduate work for 
which a degree was not awarded may petition for credit toward an advanced 
degree. After consultation between the student and his adviser, the 
department shall submit to the Graduate College its recommendations, which 
should include the courses required for transfer, those allowed (including the 
number of quarter hours of credit recommended) those disallowed, and 
grades and certification from the registrar or the college dean of the 
applicable institution that the courses are graduate level and were not used 
toward fulfillment of the requirements for a degree. The number of credits 
that may be transferred is determined on an individual basis. (Such credit 
does not reduce residency requirements.) Six quarter hours are the equivalent 
of four semester hours (or at the Urbana campus, one semester unit of 
graduate credit). 



ACADEMIC AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 21 



Time Limitations for Advanced Degrees 

A candidate for a master's degree must complete all requirements for the 
degree within four calendar years after his initial registration in the Graduate 
College. Doctoral candidates must complete their degree requirements within 
six years after receiving the master's degree or its equivalent. In special 
circumstances the student, after consultation with his adviser, may petition 
the Graduate College and his department for an extension of this time limit. 



Advisers 

Each graduate student must have an adviser in the department in which 
he is a degree candidate. The adviser assists in planning a program of graduate 
study that fits the needs of the student and satisfies department and Graduate 
College requirements. A new student should contact his major department to 
discuss the selection of an adviser. Many departments have a coordinator of 
graduate studies whose responsibilities include direction of all graduate work 
in that department. 



Courses of Instruction 

Courses open to graduate students are of two types. Those numbered 
from 300 to 399 are open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students. 
Those numbered 400 to 499 are generally open only to graduate students. 
Some 300-level courses are available for graduate credit in departments other 
than those offering advanced degrees. Students should consult their advisers 
about the possibility of using these courses as minors. 

A number of courses carry variable credit. At the 300 level, additional 
work, in the nature of special reports, papers, or projects, is required of a 
student who registers for the maximum credit allowed. At the 400 level, some 
research, reading, and independent courses provide variable credit; propor- 
tionate time devoted to a particular activity can thus be indicated on the 
student's record. 

Prerequisites. Exceptions to prerequisites listed in course descriptions in 
this catalog may be granted only with the consent of the instructor and under 
special circumstances. 



Program Changes: A student has the option of dropping a course until the 
end of the sixth week of the quarter. Thereafter a course may not be 
dropped. However, holders of fellowships, tuition-and-fee waivers, and 
student visas must maintain the required number of credit hours. 



22 ACADEMIC AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Grading System: Final grades for courses are recorded as A, B, C, D 
(lowest passing grade), and E (failure) with numerical computations of 
grade-point averages based on a system of A=5.000. Other symbols in use, but 
not included in the computation of grade-point averages are: 

W— Officially withdrawn from the course without penalty. 

IN— Incomplete. An IN must be removed by the end of the student's second 
quarter in residence subsequent to that in which it was received, or if he 
is not in residence, by the end of the first calendar year subsequent to 
that in which the IN was received. An IN that is not removed by the 
deadline will be changed automatically to a grade of IN/E. 

DF— Grade temporarily deferred. At the end of a continuing course sequence 
the deferred grade of DF for all quarters must be converted either to a 
specific letter grade or to an IN. Deferred grades should be used only for 
499 (Thesis Research) courses, for other research, continuing seminar, or 
sequential courses, and for independent study. 

S— Satisfactory and 

U— Unsatisfactory. To be used only as the final grade in graduate thesis 
research courses, in graduate and undergraduate courses that carry zero 
credit hours, and in other courses that have been specifically approved. 

P— Pass and 

F— Fail. To be used only in courses taken under the pass-fail grading option. 
A graduate student may take courses on a pass-fail basis provided that: 

1. The courses are not within the student's irrrrrrediate area of 
specialization. 

2. Such courses account for no more than one-sixth of the total 
number of course hours taken at the University of Illinois at Chicago 
Circle and counted toward a degree. 

3. The student declares his intention to take a course on this basis at 
the time of registration. 

Probation and Drop Rules 

A student may be dropped by the Graduate College upon recommenda- 
tion of the department. If a student's cumulative average for courses taken 
for credit falls below 3.500 at the end of any quarter, he will be placed on 
probation. If the cumulative average remains below 3.500 at the end of the 
academic year (or at the end of three quarters) the student will be dropped 
from the Graduate College. Departments may set higher standards. An 
average of 3.500 or better is required for graduation. 



Course Loads 

Graduate students who are not employed are generally advised to carry 
no more than 16 quarter hours of credit, although up to 20 hours of course 



ACADEMIC AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 23 



credit are permissible in exceptional cases with consent of the Graduate 
Student Coordinator. It is recommended that students who hold part time 
employment outside the University reduce their loads to the limits for 
teaching assistants, given below. 

Fellowship holders: Fellowships are awarded to superior students; 
therefore, fellowship holders are required to carry a minimum of 16 quarter 
hours of credit. 

Graduate College tuition-and- fee-waiver holders: Students awarded special 
Graduate College tuition- and- fee waivers must carry a program of 12 quarter 
hours. 

Assistants: The academic work carried by assistants and others on the 
University staff is limited by statute. For a graduate student who holds an 
assistantship, the limits are as follows: 



Appointment 


Maximum ho\ 


urs per quarter 


Full 




4 


3/4 




8 


2/3 




9 


1/2 




12 


1/3 




15 


1/4 




16 



Minimum full time study. For purposes of enrollment certification to the 
United States Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service 
the Graduate College considers a student to be pursuing a minimum full time 
program of study if he takes: (1) 12 or more quarter hours of graduate credit, 
or (2) a program of both graduate and undergraduate courses equivalent to 12 
quarter hours of credit, or (3) 10 quarter hours of graduate study plus an 
appointment for not less than 1/3 time, or (4) 8 quarter hours of graduate 
study and an appointment as a teaching or research assistant for not less than 
l A time. However, a veteran is to be eligible for full veterans benefits, he must 
be registered for at least 1 2 quarter hours credit each quarter. 



Auditing Privileges 

A graduate student regularly registered may be permitted to attend classes 
as an auditor without credit at the discretion of the instructor in charge of 
the course. Students who wish to have their audited courses recorded must 
pay the Course-Visitor Auditor Fee (see Tuition and Fees). Persons not 
registered at the University of Illinois are permitted to attend classes, other 
than laboratory courses, as auditors, provided they pay the fee and file with 
the Office of Admissions and Records a permission form bearing the approval 
of the instructor and the Dean of the Graduate College. A student should not 
enter on his program card any courses he plans to attend as an auditor. 



24 ACADEMIC AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 



Regulations Pertaining to Degrees 



The Master's Degree 

Residence: Twenty four hours of work, including not more than 12 hours 
in courses titled Independent Study and Thesis Research, must be taken 
within two calendar years. 

The following are the requirements of the Graduate College only; 
department requirements are in addition to them. A minimum of 48 quarter 
hours is required for the master's degree. At least 16 of the 48 quarter hours 
must be in courses numbered 400 and above, and 12 of these 16 must be in 
the major field. At least 24 quarter hours must be taken in the major field of 
interest; the remaining credit may be in the field or in other courses 
appropriate to the student's educational goals. No more than 18 quarter 
hours of credit in 499, Thesis Research, may be included in a 48-hour 
program. 

Twenty-four quarter hours (which may include Thesis Research) must be 
earned at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle. Exceptions may be 
granted by the Graduate College upon recommendation of the department. 

Examinations for the master's degree. If an examination is required, its 
structure is determined by the department. If a master's thesis is presented, 
the candidate shall defend it before a committee appointed by the Dean of 
the Graduate College on the recommendation of the department. This 
committee shall consist of at least three persons , one of whom must have 
permanent membership. The approval of the thesis by a majority of the 
committee is required. 

Thesis. A student electing or required to write a master's thesis should file 
the title of the thesis with the Graduate College at least six weeks prior to 
graduation. No more than 18 quarter hours of thesis credit may be included 
in a 4 8- quarter-hour program. Credit in thesis research cannot be applied to a 
degree until the thesis is accepted. For specific instructions on the format of 
the thesis the student should obtain a copy of the leaflet, "Instructions for 
Preparation of Theses," from the Graduate College Office, 1523 University 
Hall. 



The Doctoral Degree 

Residence: At least 12 hours beyond the master's level or its equivalent 
must be taken at Chicago Circle in regularly scheduled courses (excluding 
Independent Study and Thesis Research) within one calendar year. Three 
consecutive quarters of at least 8 hours (which may include Thesis Research) 
must be taken at Chicago Circle. 

One member of the committee may be from outside the department or from outside 
the University. 



ACADEMIC AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 25 



The general requirements for this degree are stated below; any special 
requirements are given in the departmental listings. 

Each student's schedule of course work and research (a total of 144 
quarter hours of credit beyond the bachelor's degree) is planned in 
consultation with his adviser with consideration given to the candidate's 
previous training, his career objective, the general regulations of the Graduate 
College, and any specific departmental requirements. It is the student's 
responsibility to be aware of these regulations and requirements and to satisfy 
them as early as possible. The major area of specialization consists of a 
selection of courses closely related to each other, not all of which are 
necessarily offered by the major department. If a student elects or is required 
by departmental regulations to declare a minor outside his major department, 
the selection of courses must be approved by the departments or divisions 
concerned. A minor area of specialization consists of a group of course 
offerings that have a distinct relationship, though they may be offered in 
more than one department. 

Except in special cases, teaching is required of each graduate student as a 
part of his professional growth and development. 

Foreign Language Requirement The foreign language requirement for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy is left to the individual department, division, 
or jointly administered program, subject to the approval of the Graduate 
College. 

Examinations. The Graduate College requires two examinations; a 
committee will be appointed for each. The first examination, called the 
preliminary, is an examination of the candidate's grasp of the field of his 
major (and minor) subjects. The second is an examination on the candidate's 
dissertation. The department may have additional requirements. The commit- 
tee for the preliminary examinations shall consist of at least five persons 
representing the major and minor areas. * Members of the committee will be 
appointed by the Dean of the Graduate College on recommendation of the 
department. At least two of these members must have permanent member- 
ship on the Graduate Faculty. 

The preliminary examination may be written, oral, or both at the 
discretion of the department. The timing is also at the discretion of the 
department. The recommendations of the department, including the action of 
the committee, shall be reported to the Graduate College. Part of the report 
will be a summary of the votes of the committee members. The total vote 
shall be pass, conditional (specified), or fail. A candidate may not be passed if 
he receives more than one vote of fail. When there is no unanimity, the 
Graduate College will act as arbitrator. The Dean, in consultation with the 
department head and the committee chairman, may allow the candidate to be 
given a second examination at some later date. The second committee may 
consist of the same examiners. No more than two preliminary examinations 
may be given. 

*One member of the committee may be from outside the department or from outside 
the University. 



26 ACADEMIC AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The dissertation committee shall follow the foregoing regulations except 
that the minimum membership shall be three. Two of these members must 
have permanent membership on the Graduate Faculty. 

Thesis. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is primarily a research degree 
and the candidate must demonstrate his capacity for independent research by 
the presentation of an original thesis on a topic within his major field of 
study. The subject of the thesis must be reported to the doctoral committee 
and to the Graduate College at the time of the preliminary examination. The 
candidate must register each term, except summer quarters, until he receives 
his degree. After satisfying the minimum credit requirement (144 quarter 
hours of courses and thesis research beyond the bachelor's degree) the 
student maintains his status as a candidate by registering for a full load of 
credit hours in 499 (Thesis Research) until his dissertation has been accepted. 
In cases where this imposes financial hardship or where the student is not 
making any use of University facilities or staff time, the student may request 
Graduate College permission to register for zero credit in 499. 

Candidates engaged in thesis research may find it desirable or expedient 
to publish prior to the conferring of the degree certain findings that later will 
be incorporated in the dissertation. In this case, appropriate acknowledge- 
ment of the earlier publication should be included in the dissertation. The 
Graduate College encourages such publication, but the thesis in its entirety 
may not be published before all degree requirements have been completed. 
Directions regarding the format of the thesis are given in the leaflet, 
"Instructions for Preparation of Theses," which may be obtained in the 
Graduate College office. The candidate must submit to the Graduate College 
office, no later than the date specified in the current calendar of the College, 
the original and first carbon copy (or two copies reproduced by an approved 
method) of his thesis and one typewritten copy of an abstract not exceeding 
600 words. Each candidate who passes the final examination must pay a $25 
microfilm fee. This provides for microfilming the complete thesis, with one 
copy deposited in the University of Illinois Library, and publication of the 
abstract in Dissertation Abstracts. 



One member of the committee may be from outside the department or from outside 
the University. 



Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges 



All students are assessed tuition and fees which are payable in full as part 
of registration. Arrangements to defer payment under special circumstances 
may be made with the Business Office. The amount of tuition and the service 
fee vary with the number of credit hours for which the student registers. 
Tuition (but not the service fee) also varies according to the resident or 
nonresident status of the student in the State of Illinois. 

In planning to meet financial requirements for the academic year 
1971-1972, students should be aware that tuition rates at State universities 
will not be finally known until budgets are approved for that period by the 
General Assembly. The Board of Higher Education has undertaken a study of 
tuition charges and financial-aid programs and is expected to make 
recommendations to the Governor and the General Assembly for considera- 
tion in the budgetary deliberations during the next legislative session. 



Tuition and Fees—Chicago Circle 

(Subject to Change) 





Range I 

IOY2 quarter 
hours and above 


Range II 

5V2 through 10 
quarter hours 


Range III 

through 5 

quarter hours 


Range IV 

credit only 

Resident 

and 




Res. 


Nonres. 


Res. 


Nonres. 


Res. 


Nonres. 


Nonresident 


Tuition (except 
those holding 
exemptions 


$132 


$418 


$ 92 


$287 


$ 50 


$157 


$25 


Service Fee 


32 


32 


24 


24 


14 


14 


7 


Hospital-Medica] 
Surgical 
Insurance Fee 


t- 

7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


Total 


$171 


$457 


$123 


$318 


$ 71 


$178 


$39 



Tuition and Fee Deposit. The University requires a nonrefundable $30 
advance deposit, payable when an applicant receives notice of admission. This 



28 TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER CHARGES 



deposit reserves the applicant a place only in the session to which he has been 
admitted. It is applied to his tuition and fees for that quarter; it cannot be 
applied to any subsequent quarter should he fail to enter in the quarter to 
which he has been admitted. 

Residence Classification. The residence classification of an applicant is 
determined on the basis of information given on his application and other 
credentials. Fees are assessed in accordance with this decision. If the student 
believes he has a legitimate cause for change of status, he may petition for a 
change on a form provided by the Office of Admissions and Records. 
Petitions are considered within thirty days from the date designated in the 
official University Calendar as that upon which instruction begins for the 
academic period for which the fee is payable. However, if the nonresident 
tuition was not assessed on or prior to that date, the claim for refund may be 
filed within thirty days after the nonresident fee was assessed and the student 
was given notice of its assessment. Additional evidence to substantiate a 
request may be required. If the student expects to ask for a change of 
residence classification, it is advisable for him to request that the adjustment 
be made prior to the registration period. 

In the event a student who claims he is a resident is dissatisfied with an 
adverse ruling of the Director of Admissions and Records, he may obtain a 
review of such decision by the Legal Counsel of the University by filing a 
written request with the Director of Admissions and Records within twenty 
days after he has been notified of the ruling. 

Further information concerning residency may be secured from the 
Director of Admissions and Records. A brochure entitled Regulations 
Governing Assessment of Resident or Nonresident Student Fees is also 
available. 



Exemptions and Assessments 

A student may be exempted from one or more of the following charges if 
he qualifies under the stated conditions: 

Tuition is waived for: 

1. Holders of tuition- waiver scholarships. 

2. All academic employees of the University or allied agencies on 
appointment for at least 25 percent but not more than 67 percent of 
full-time service. 

3. All permanent nonacademic employees of the University or allied 
agencies on appointment for at least 25 percent of full time who 
register in University courses in Range II or III. 

4. Holders of graduate tuition- and- fee waivers awarded by the Graduate 
College. 

5. Holders of grants or contracts from outside armed forces of the 
United States who are stationed and 



TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER CHARGES 29 



6. Teachers and administrators who cooperate in the practice teaching 
program. (Exemption is allowed for each quarter of assignment within 
the same calendar year— September through August.) 

7. Persons registered in noncredit seminars only. 

8. University employees registered at the request of their departments in 
noncredit courses especially established to improve the work of the 
employee. 

9. Academic staff members emeriti. 

The nonresident portion of tuition (if the enrollee is subject to payment 
of tuition) is waived for: 

1. All staff members (academic, administrative, or permanent nonaca- 
demic) on appointment for at least 25 percent of full time with the 
University or allied agencies. 

2. The faculties of state-supported institutions of higher education in 
Illinois. 

3. The teaching staff in private and public elementary and secondary 
schools in Illinois. 

4. The spouses and dependent children of those listed in items 1 and 2. 
(Dependent children are those who qualify as dependents for federal 
income tax purposes.) 

5. Persons actively serving in one of the Armed Forces of the United 
States who are stationed and present in the State of Illinois in 
connection with that service. 

6. The spouses and dependent children of those listed in item 5, as long 
as they remain stationed, present, and living in Illinois. 

For fee assessment purposes, a staff appointment must be for not less 
than three-fourths of the term. This is interpreted as a minimum of nine 
weeks in a quarter. Staff tuition- and- fee privileges do not apply to students 
employed on an hourly basis in either an academic or nonacademic capacity 
or to persons on leave without pay. 

For fee assessment purposes, a permanent nonacademic employee is 
defined as a person who has been assigned to an established, permanent, and 
continuous nonacademic position and who is employed for at least 25 
percent of full time. University employees appointed to established civil 
service positions whose rate of pay is determined by negotiation, prevailing 
rates, or union affiliation are entitled to the same tuition- and- fee privileges 
accorded other staff members under the regulations. 

A student who resigns his staff appointment, or whose appointment is 
cancelled before he has rendered service for at least three-fourths of the term, 
becomes subject to the full amount of the appropriate tuition and fees for 
that term unless he withdraws from his University classes at the same time the 
appointment becomes void, or unless he files clearance for graduation within 
one week after the appointment becomes void. 



30 TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER CHARGES 



Fees 



The Service Fee is applied toward the operating expense of Chicago Circle 
Center, the financing of the Center building, and the cost of the Student 
Activities Program. 

The service fee is waived for: 

1. All staff members of the University or allied agencies who are on 
appointment for at least 25 percent but not more than 67 percent of 
full time. 

2. Holders of graduate tuition-and-fee waivers awarded by the Graduate 
College. 

3. Students registered in absentia. 

4. Students registered in courses taught off campus. 

5. Holders of grants or contracts from outside sponsors if the service fee 
is charged to the contract or to grant funds. 

6. Cooperating teachers and administrators described under Exemptions, 
item 6. 

7. Persons registered in noncredit seminars only. 

8. University employees, registered at the request of their departments, 
in noncredit courses for the purpose of improving their work. 

9. Emeriti. 

The Course-Visitor-Auditor Fee of $15 is assessed all class visitors who are 
not in Range I in the tuition-and-fee schedule. 

The Late -Registration Fine of $15 is levied against all students who 
complete registration after classes have begun. 

The Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance Fee is the same for all students, 
regardless of the number of hours for which they are enrolled or of their 
Illinois residence status. All students enrolled and in attendance at Chicago 
Circle are covered by a health insurance policy, for which they pay a fee each 
quarter at registration. Eligible dependents of insured students (spouse and/or 
unmarried dependent children under nineteen years of age) may also be 
insured if the student makes application to the University Cashier (Room 
406, University Hall) within the time specified by the insurance policy. 

If a student withdraws from the University, he does not receive an 
insurance fee refund since he remains insured for the balance of the quarter 
from which he withdrew. Special provisions exist for students to be covered 
by this insurance during the summer months, irrespective of their registration 
for that part of the year. For further information, consult the Insurance 
Office, Room 427, University Hall. 

If a student presents evidence of insurance in force which provides him 
equivalent coverage, he may petition the University Insurance Office for a 
refund of this fee. Refunds are not made on any other basis. The student 



TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER CHARGES 31 



should also consult the Insurance Office about the time limit for such a 
refund petition. 

The Deferred-Fee Charge of $2 is assessed when arrangements have been 
made with the Office of Business Affairs to defer payment of fees. The charge 
must be paid on the day the agreement is reached and is nonrefundable. 

The Lost-Photo-Identification-Card Fee of $1 is assessed for replacing a 
lost or destroyed Photo-Identification Card, issued to the student at the time 
of his first registration at Chicago Circle. Cost for replacing the current 
Student Fee Receipt Card is 50 cents. 

The Transcript Fee. A student is issued one transcript of his record 
without charge. For each additional transcript, a fee of $1 is assessed. 



Refunds 

Students who withdraw from the University or from a course are entitled 
to a refund of a portion of the tuition and fees, if they have been paid, under 
the following circumstances. 

On Withdrawal from the University: The full amount of tuition and fees 
assessed, except for a $31 nonrefundable charge, is refunded to students who 
withdraw within the first ten days of instruction in a quarter, After the tenth 
day of instruction and before the middle of the quarter, one half of the 
amount assessed, except for a $31 nonrefundable charge, is refunded. No 
refund is issued after midquarter. 

No refund is issued if the total assessment was less than $31 (for example, 
a student on a tuition-waiver scholarship). 

The calendar in the quarterly Timetable indicates the dates on which the 
above regulations are effective. 

On Withdrawal from a Course: If such withdrawal results in a reduction in 
the student's program to a lower tuition- and- fee range, the full difference is 
refunded during the full-rebate period; half the amount of the difference is 
refunded when withdrawal occurs during the half-rebate period; no refund is 
made if withdrawal occurs thereafter. 

On Withdrawal by a Visit or -Audit or: A full refund will be issued if the 
withdrawal is made within ten days after payment of fees. Thereafter, no 
refund will be made. 

On Withdrawal to Enter Military Service: If withdrawal occurs during the 
first six weeks of instruction, the student is entitled to a full refund of his 
tuition and fees, less the Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance fee. If with- 



32 TUITION, FEES, AND OTHER CHARGES 



drawal to enter military service occurs between the fifth and eighth weeks of 
instruction, the student will receive a one-half refund of his tuition and fees 
(less the Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance Fee). When withdrawal occurs 
after the fifth week of instruction, under certain circumstances, the student 
may receive partial or full credit in some of the courses in which he is 
registered at the time of the withdrawal. Further information is available in 
the Graduate College, 1523 University Hall. 

No refund of tuition and fees is made after the eighth week. 



Assistantships, Fellowships, and Financial Aid 



Various types of financial assistance are available each year to promising 
students in all fields of study in the Graduate College. For the most part, the 
information in this section deals with aid administered by the University of 
Illinois. It should be noted, however, that there are also a number of 
nationally sponsored fellowships that provide support for graduate students 
for study either at the University of Illinois or elsewhere. Among these are 
the National Science Foundation fellowships and the Woodrow Wilson 
fellowships. Other fellowships are offered through foundations, industrial 
concerns, and individuals. Further information and application procedures for 
nationally sponsored fellowships may be obtained by writing directly to the 
agency concerned or, in most instances, to the University department in 
which the student plans to major. 

The University of Illinois at Chicago Circle offers five basic types of 
financial aid for graduate students: fellowships, assistantships in both 
teaching and research, tuition-and-fee waivers, loans, and employment. Each 
type of assistance is described in the following sections. In the operation of 
these programs and in selecting individuals for participation in and for 
administration of the programs, the University of Illinois will not discriminate 
on the grounds of race, creed, color, or national origin of any applicant or 
participant. 



Fellowships 

Fellowship stipends are gratuities awarded in recognition of scholarly 
achievement and promise. They enable a student to pursue his graduate 
studies and research without requiring him to render any service. The stipends 
of different fellowships vary, but with few exceptions they are currently not 
less than $1800 for the nine-month academic year. The fellow's stipend is 
legally regarded as a gift, not as compensation for services rendered, and is, 
therefore, exempt from income tax. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, all 
fellows whose appointments are administered by the Graduate College are 
exempt from tuition and fees. A fellow is required to pursue a full program of 
graduate study (at least 16 quarter hours per quarter) and may not engage in 
remunerative employment, other than an assistantship for University Fellows, 
without the permission of the Dean of the Graduate College. 



34 ASSISTANTSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND FINANCIAL AID 

University Fellowships are awarded on the basis of an all -campus 
competition and are not restricted to any particular field of graduate study 
listed in this Catalog. University Fellowships are for nine months and carry a 
stipend of not less than $2,000 plus exemption from tuition and all regular 
fees except the Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance fee. 

A student receiving a University Fellowship is also eligible to accept a 
part-time assistantship up to a maximum of one-quarter time. Under such an 
appointment, the fellow's basic stipend remains unchanged and tax-free, but 
the salary for teaching or research is generally subject to income tax. 
University Fellows who also hold an assistantship must carry full programs of 
graduate study (at least 16 quarter hours per quarter) unless expressly 
authorized by the Dean of the Graduate College to carry reduced programs. 
Students whose first interest is in teaching should so indicate on their 
applications. 

Industrial, Endowed, and Special Fellowships. Various industrial firms, 
foundations, and private individuals have generously donated funds to 
support a number of special fellowships for graduate students at the 
University of Illinois. The stipends and supplemental allowances of these 
fellowships are not uniform, and most of them are restricted to students in 
particular areas of study. Further information may be obtained from the 
department in which the student plans to register. 

National Science Foundation Traineeships. Under this program, grants are 
made directly to the participating institutions, which select promising 
individuals for full-time graduate study. Appointments may be made only 
from among citizens of the United States (or native residents of a Unites 
States possession) who are enrolled in programs leading to an advanced degree 
in the mathematical, physical, medical, biological, and engineering sciences, 
anthropology, economics, the history and philosophy of science, linguistics, 
political science, psychology, and sociology. Also included are the interdis- 
ciplinary areas which comprise overlapping fields among two or more sciences 
(for example, goechemistry, meteorology, and oceanography). 

Trainees must devote full time to programs leading to advanced degrees 
and may be appointed for either nine or twelve months. A school may require 
or permit a trainee to include in his training program teaching which 
contributes to his academic progress. 

The basic stipend for a twelve-month award is $2,400 for the first year, 
$2,600 for the intermediate year, and $2,800 for the terminal-year level. An 
allowance of $500 is granted for each dependent. For nine-month awards, the 
allowance is prorated. Inquiries concerning traineeships should be directed to 
the department of the University in which the student is seeking a 
traineeship. 



ASSISTANTSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND FINANCIAL AID 35 



Assistantships 

The various departments of the University employ graduate students as 
either teaching assistants or research assistants. The duties of a teaching 
assistant usually involve such activities as classroom instruction, supervision 
of a laboratory section, the guidance of discussion sections, and paper 
grading. Research assistants participate in research activities under the 
supervision of University faculty members. In some instances the work of a 
research assistant may be related to his thesis research; in others it may be 
entirely different. Although most research assistantships are awarded to 
graduate students who have completed one or more quarters of graduate 
work at the University of Illinois, new students are eligible for such 
appointments. Each assistant is paid a salary for services rendered, and, under 
present ruling, this salary generally is subject to income tax.* Assistants 
holding more than one-fourth-time appointments are normally not permitted 
to carry full programs of graduate study during the period of their 
appointments. 



Nature of Appointment 



Full time 

Three-fourths time 
Two-thirds time 
One-half time 
One-third time 
One-quarter time 



tuition and all fees except the Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance fee. The 
above table lists the provisions of various assistantships. Applications may be 
made directly to the relevant University department. 

Graduate students who hold academic appointments for the winter and 
spring quarters of one academic year, either as employees or fellows, and for 
whom tuition and/or fees have been provided through waiver or through cash 
payment by an outside agency, are entitled to a waiver of the same kinds of 
tuition and fees for the summer quarter immediately following, provided they 
do not hold appointments during the summer quarter. 



*The District Director of Internal Revenue has ruled that under certain conditions 
income tax need not be withheld from remuneration paid to research assistants engaged 
in thesis research. 



Maximum 


Expected Clock 


Registration 


Hours of Service 


per Quarter 


per Week 


Quarter Hours 




4 


37 1 / 2 


8 


29 


9 


25 1 / 2 


12 


19 


15 


12 1 / 2 


16 


9 1 / 2 



36 ASSISTANTSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND FINANCIAL AID 



Tuition-and-Fee Waivers 



A graduate tuition-and-fee waiver provides exemption from tuition and ail 
incidental fees (except the Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance fee) for the 
academic year. To hold these awards students must be in residence and must 
register for at least 12 hours per quarter during the academic year. They may, 
however, accept part-time or incidental employment not to exceed 20 hours a 
week either within or without the University. 

Veterans who are admissible to a graduate program and who meet certain 
residence requirements may be eligible for exemption from tuition and 
certain fees under the State statute covering Military Scholarships. Further 
information may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid, Room, 850, 
University Hall. 



How to Apply 

Application materials and instructions may be obtained from the 
Graduate College or from any graduate department. Only one application 
form is needed to apply for any of the types of financial aid listed. 

To be considered for a University Fellowship beginning in September, the 
application should be filed with the major department no later than the 
preceding February 15. Applications for tuition-and-fee waivers and assistant- 
ships are accepted by the departments after that date, but applicants for such 
appointments are strongly urged to submit their applications as early as 
possible since many departments offer their assistantships at the same time 
they consider applications for fellowships. 



Announcement of Awards 

Most of the fellowship awards are announced by the Graduate College on 
or about April 1. Recipients are expected to accept or decline by April 15. 
The University of Illinois adheres to the following resolution adopted by the 
members of the Association of American Universities and a number of other 
graduate schools in North America. 

In every case in which a graduate assistantship, scholarship, or fellowship 
for the next academic year is offered to an actual or a prospective graduate 
student, the student, if he indicates his acceptance before April 15, will still 
have complete freedom to reconsider his acceptance and to accept another 
fellowship, or graduate assistantship. He has committed himself, however, not 
to resign an appointment after this date unless he is formally released from it. 



ASSISTANTSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND FINANCIAL AID 37 



Loans 

Long-Term Loan Funds may be available to those students who have a 
demonstrated financial need. Loans approved by the Director of Financial 
Aid are subject to the availability of funds, and no commitment is made until 
all financial information has been reported. The signature of a qualified 
endorser or satisfactory collateral is required for all long-term loans. 
Exceptions to this requirement may be made by the terms of the loan fund or 
may be waived in meritorious cases by the Director of Financial Aid. 

Students must be in good standing before an application is accepted for 
processing. If loans are valid for a three-quarter period, the student must 
remain in good standing to receive a second advance. Any exceptions to this 
rule must be requested from the Office of Financial Aid. The Office of 
Financial Aid maintains a list of loan sources, such as private foundations, 
church-related sources, and bank sources in addition to those below. This 
information will be provided upon request. 

University Loans. A student may borrow from the University Loan Fund 
an amount not to exceed $1,000 per year or a total of $2,500. He must begin 
to repay his loan, at an interest rate of 3 percent annually, within four 
months after leaving the University, and he has up to four years in which to 
make complete repayment. 

National Defense Education Act Loans. A graduate student may borrow 
money from funds provided to the University under Title II of the National 
Defense Education Act. The limit is $2,500 per year, to a total of $10,000. 
He must begin to repay his loan, at 3 percent interest annually, nine months 
after he has ceased to pursue a full-time course of study at the University, and 
the entire loan must be repaid within ten years after repayment begins. 

It should be noted, however, that up to 50 percent of a National Defense 
Education Act loan will be cancelled if the borrower serves as a full-time 
teacher in a public or nonprofit private school in the United States. This 
applies to elementary or secondary schools, as well as to institutions of higher 
education. Such cancellation will be at the rate of 10 percent of the loan for 
each academic year of such service. Teaching in designated "hardship" areas 
carries loan cancellation up to 100 percent. 

Cosigners are not required for NDEA loan funds. 

United Student Aid Fund Loans. A graduate student may borrow up to 
$1500 per year. The maximum amount that a student may borrow under all 
guaranteed loan programs is $7,500. The amount of the loan will be 
determined on an individual basis. No notes under this plan may bear more 
than 7 percent simple interest. Repayments begin the first day of the tenth 
month after the student ceases to be a full-time student. Repayment is 
scheduled over a period of not less than 5 years nor more than 10 years. 
Monthly installments may not be less than $30. 



38 ASSISTANTSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND FINANCIAL AID 

Illinois State Guaranteed Loans. The Illinois General Assembly has 
authorized an Illinois loan program to guarantee student loans made by 
commercial lenders to legal residents of the State of Illinois. An eligible 
student may borrow from a minimum of $300 to a maximum of $1,500. It is 
expected that a student will borrow only once during the academic year. 
Repayment does not begin until the student either graduates or ceases 
full-time study. A loan will not be granted in an amount which exceeds the 
established educational expenses at the eligible college selected by the 
student, minus other scholarship or loan assistance. Applications may be 
secured from the Office of Financial Aid, 812 University Hall. 

Short-Term Emergency Loans. Students may request short-term 
emergency loans from $5 to $100. The loan must be paid within forty-five 
days or by the end of the quarter, whichever date is earlier. Request forms 
may be obtained from the offices of the Dean of Men or Dean of Women, 
Room 809, University Hall. 



Employment 

The Student Employment Office, 810 University Hall, welcomes the 
opportunity to counsel students about employment. The office also offers 
students a library of job-reference materials, job listings, interviews, and 
referrals for employment to University departments and to agencies and 
business firms in the Chicago area. Securing a position through proper 
application and retaining that position through good work is, of course, the 
responsibility of the individual. 



Campus Facilities and Student Services 



Library 

The University Library provides the books, periodicals, and related 
materials required to meet the instructional needs of the student. Library 7 
collections necessary for keeping scholars informed in their respective fields 
are currently in a state of rapid growth. 

Government Documents. The Library has been a depository for United 
States government documents since 1957. The map collection contains 
topographical, army, and state highway maps. Numerous materials are 
available in microfilm or microprint. 

The Department of Special Collections administers the Library's collec- 
tion of maps and rare books and a growing collection of manuscripts. 
Included are materials in the fields of social welfare, politics, and labor, as 
well as those relating to various Chicago religious and ethnic groups. 
Among these materials are the records of the Chicago Urban League, the 
Juvenile Protective Association, the Illinois Humane Society, the Chicago 
League of Women Voters, and the Metropolitan Housing and Planning 
Council of Chicago. The Jane Addams Memorial Collection, located in the 
restored Hull Mansion on the Chicago Circle campus, contains books, 
manuscripts, and memorabilia dealing with Miss Addams' life and work and 
with the social welfare movement. All such materials are available to faculty 
and graduate students for research. 



The Urban Historical Collections contain several thousand items related 
to urban affairs, Negro history, social settlement work, Hull House, Chicago 
politics, and ethnic history, all of which are available for research not only to 
established scholars but to graduate students in urban-related disciplines. 

A detailed outline of the general collections and suggestions for effective 
use of the library will be found in the Library Handbook, copies of which are 
available at all Library service desks. 



40 CAMPUS FACILITIES AND STUDENT SERVICES 



The Computer Center 

Recognizing that large-scale electronic computers are now in widespread 
use as a research tool in nearly all scholarly disciplines, the University has 
established a Computer Center that is charged with administering a facility to 
meet the educational and research needs of the University. 

The present Computer Center equipment includes an IBM 360 Model 
651 computer with 524,288 bytes of .75 microsecond core storage and 
1,050,176 bytes of 8 microsecond core storage. In addition to the main 
facility, there are a number of medium-speed remote job entry stations, 
which allow jobs to be submitted to the main computer facility from remote 
locations. An extensive conversational time-sharing system is also in operation 
with a number of typewriter consoles located throughout the campus. Also in 
operation is an IBM 1800 process control computer with 32,768 words of 2 
microsecond core storage. 

The staff members of the Computer Center teach courses in programming 
and numerical analysis in cooperation with the Department of Mathematics 
and the College of Engineering. The staff also assists other departments in 
utilizing the equipment for both teaching and research throughout the 
campus. 



Housing Office 

The Housing Office offers a wide range of services to graduate students. 
Daily and weekly housing can be arranged while newly arrived graduate 
students are searching for permanent quarters. Special rates are available at 
motels convenient to the campus when reservations are made through this 
office. Daily rates vary from $5 to $15 for a single room, and from $16 to 
$20 for a double room. Transportation for students wishing to visit available 
housing will be arranged by appointment. 

A multiple listing of privately owned housing including furnished and 
unfurnished apartments, houses for rent or sale, and rooms for rent is 
maintained in this office. Persons listing housing have signed a pledge not to 
discriminate on the basis of race, religion, or national origin. 

Every effort is made to assist those seeking roommates; the files contain 
listings by individuals who wish to share accommodations. The Housing 
Office also cooperates with off-campus organizations specializing in room- 
mate location. 

Additional information is available from: 
Office of Auxiliary Services 
Housing Office 

Box 4348, Chicago, Illinois 60680 
Telephone: (312) 663-5059 



CAMPUS FACILITIES AND STUDENT SERVICES 41 



Laboratory Facilities 

At present the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Geological 
Sciences, and Physics and the engineering sciences occupy research facilities 
in the Science and Engineering Laboratories, the twin buildings at the south 
end of the main campus; the first four departments occupy, in addition, the 
new Science and Engineering South building located between Taylor Street 
and Roosevelt Road, south of the present laboratories. These buildings afford 
considerable space for housing specialized equipment, the details of which are 
available from the department concerned. 

The Phonetic-Linguistic Research Laboratory contains recording and 
specialized equipment patterned after a similar installation at the University 
of Hamburg. 

The Behavioral Science Center contains research laboratories for demog- 
raphy, sociology, and psychology. 



Facilities Within the City 

The University of Illinois Medical Center departments cooperate with the 
Chicago Circle Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Psychology, 
and Sociology in encouraging joint graduate study, seminars, and the use of 
the Medical Library. 

The Newberry Library (social sciences and humanities), the Crerar 
Library (science and technology), the Art Institute, the Field Museum of 
Natural History, the Museum of Negro History, the Library of International 
Relations, the Center for Research Libraries, the Chicago Historical Society, 
and the Chicago Municipal Reference Library are important nearby 
institutions for research. 



Student Affairs 

The Office of Student Affairs provides a wide variety of activities and 
services for students and student life at Chicago Circle. Some of the services 
immediately relevant to many graduate students are described below. 

The Dean of Men and the Dean of Women 

The offices of these deans administer special emergency loan funds and 
serve as advisers for assistance with personal and budget problems. They also 
provide assistance in finding housing in Chicago or in Urbana if a student 
plans to transfer. 



42 CAMPUS FACILITIES AND STUDENT SERVICES 



The Student Counseling Service 

By providing personal counseling, specialized group services, and 
psychological testing, the Student Counseling Service aims to foster the 
educational, vocational, and personal development of the student so that he 
may attain maximum benefits from his educational experiences. It is the 
privilege of the student to make use of the following services whenever the 
need arises. 

Educational, Vocational, and Personal Counseling are available to any 
student who may be uncertain about his choice of college or major or who 
needs help in choosing an occupation or who is concerned with personal 
problems. 

Group Services are provided for the student who wishes to improve his 
reading comprehension and speed, who wants to establish better study 
methods, who needs help in planning a career, or who wishes to develop his 
interpersonal skills. 

Individual and Group Tests are offered to registered students in support 
of educational, vocational, and personal counseling. In addition, the student 
interested in taking various national examinations for admission to graduate 
and professional colleges may wish to consult with the Student Counseling 
Service. 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic, under the auspices of the Student 
Counseling Service, provides, free of charge, facilities for hearing testing, 
diagnostic speech and voice evaluations, and correction of speech problems. 
Students who wish assistance in correcting speech difficulties, including those 
arising from foreign accents, hearing impairments, and voice or articulation 
problems, should avail themselves of the services of the clinic, which is 
located in 202 Grant Hall. 



The University Health Service 

The University provides clinic services for both preventive medicine and 
treatment. The cost of most medical expenses that cannot be assumed by the 
Health Service is covered by the student Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance, 
supervised by the Insurance Division of the Business Office, for which the 
student pays a quarterly fee. 

Beds for the temporary day care of ill students are provided; however, the 
University does not provide hospital care for its students, the large majority 
of whom are from families living in the Chicago area; hence, cases requiring 
bed care are referred to the student's family doctor and to hospitals of the 
community. 



CAMPUS FACILITIES AND STUDENT SERVICES 43 



The Office of Organizations and Activities 

More than 200 registered student organizations at Chicago Circle are 
assisted by this office in the conduct of their constitutional, financial, and 
social functions. Out-of-class activities and organizations are encouraged as a 
part of the broad education of the student, through which he may prepare 
himself for informed membership, including leadership, in community affairs. 

The range of student organizations includes educational, preprofessional, 
political, religious, social-issue, arts, literary, and recreational groupings. 
Additional organizations will be formed with further development of the 
campus. 



Foreign Student Affairs 

Foreign students are assisted in evaluating their abilities, planning their 
programs, and interpreting regulations applicable to them. This service 
includes assistance on problems of extension of stay, employment, border 
crossing, and details of maintaining legal status, housing, and understanding 
of the American way of life. 



Placement Services 

Graduate students as well as seniors who will begin their careers 
immediately after they are graduated are encouraged to register at the 
Placement Office for counseling, for aid in getting in touch with employers, 
and for planning and scheduling interviews with those representatives of 
business firms, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations who visit 
the Chicago Circle campus in the fall and the spring. Students should register 
early in the fall of the year to avoid missing important interviews with 
representatives of firms from all over the United States. 

The aims of the Placement Office are: to assist the University graduate in 
making a wise and responsible choice of a career for his own greatest 
satisfaction, to eliminate wasteful turnover, and to assist the graduate in 
achieving the most fruitful long-term investment of his talents for himself, for 
his employer, and for society. 



The Departments 



All department admission and degree requirements are in addition to 
those of the Graduate College. Students must familiarize themselves with 
both sets of requirements. Exceptions to prerequisites listed in course 
descriptions in this catalog may be granted only with the consent of the 
instructor and under special circumstances. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professors: Laura A. Bohannan, Charles A. Reed 

Associate Professors: Susan T. Freeman, Robert L. Hall, Jack H. Prost 

Assistant Professors: Elizabeth A. Brandt, Merwyn S. Garbarino, Paul E. 
Hockings, Gibson McGuire, Stephen L. Schensul, Sylvia J. Vatuk 

The department offers a program leading to the Master of Arts. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or 
university and must meet the requirements for admission to the Graduate 
College. Under ordinary circumstances, they must have a grade-point average 
of 4.000 (A=5.000) for the last 90 quarter hours of undergraduate study and 
must rank above the 70th percentile on the Graduate Record Examination 
verbal and quantitative tests. Three letters of recommendation and a brief 
statement outlining the student's professional goals must be submitted. 
Students entering without an adequate background in anthropology will be 
expected to make up deficiencies before formal admission to candidacy is 
granted. 



Degree Requirements 

A minimum of 48 quarter hours is required for the master's degree. All 
candidates must complete the course work outlined below, pass a comprehen- 



ANTHROPOLOGY 45 



sive examination, and submit a thesis. Students engaged in specialized thesis 
research that demands a reading knowledge of a foreign language or a working 
knowledge of statistics will be expected to demonstrate satisfactory compre- 
hension of the relevant language or skill. Foreign students must have adequate 
facility in the English language. 

Students are required to complete a minimum of 36 quarter hours of 
study before admission to the comprehensive examination for the M.A. in 
anthropology. The distribution of graduate courses is: 

12 quarter hours in Anthropology 400, Theory and Method in Anthro- 
pology; 430, Theory and Method in Physical Anthropology; 450, Theory 
and Method in Prehistory. 

16 quarter hours in advanced courses in anthropology or related fields, 
e.g., sociology, political science, psychology, or history. 
A minimum of one seminar in the anthropological field of specialization. 
No more than 16 hours in Anthropology 499, Thesis Research. 
After three quarters of residence a candidate ordinarily is expected to pass a 
comprehensive examination covering the following fields of anthropology: 
theory and method in social and cultural anthropology; physical anthropology; 
archaeology; and ethnology of one culture area, such as North America, 
Mesoamerica, Africa, or Mediterranean Europe. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

310. Peasant Societies. 4 hours. Research and reading in the comparative study of 
peasant societies in diverse regions of the world; special emphasis, during lecture 
and discussion, on a critical review of the anthropological literature delineating a 
peasant stratum of social organization and defining its characteristics. Prerequisites: 
8 hours of social anthropology or 8 hours of sociology and consent of the 

ins instructor. 

311. Cultural Problems in Urbanization. 4 hours. The processes of urbanization and of 
cultural and societal adjustments to urban life; case studies illustrate the variety of 
adjustments to urban life. Prerequisite: Anth. 213. 

314. Kinship, Family, and Household. 4 hours. Comparative study of the institutions 
of marriage, family, and household; the extension of kinship norms and values to 
other aspects of culture and society. Prerequisite: Anth. 213. 

315. Comparative Religious Movements. 4 hours. Analysis of religious behavior; special 
reference to the emergence of messianic cults in Africa, Melanesia, and among 
North American Indians and New World Negroes. Prerequisites: 8 hours of social 
anthropology or 8 hours of sociology and consent of the instructor. 

316. Economic Life of Primitive Peoples. 4 hours. Patterns of production, distribution, 
and consumption in non-Western cultures. Cultural variation in attitudes toward 
labor, concepts of property, and prestige and wealth. Prerequisite: 8 hours of 
social anthropology; for nonmajors, consent of the instructor. 



46 ANTHROPOLOGY 



317. The Gross-Cultural Study of Social Control. 4 hours. Cultural-jural structures in 
non-Western societies; modes of dispute settlement, nature and range of sanctions, 
and processes of social control. Prerequisite: Anth. 213 or 327. 

321. Cultural Evolution. 4 hours. Critical review of theories; examination of 
ethnographic materials and data on cultural change and cultural contact for the 
purpose of examining the mechanisms of change. Prerequisite: Anth. 200. 

322. Comparative Methods in Social Anthropology. 4 hours. Introduction to the 
several kinds of comparative method, including field work, small-sample and 
large-sample studies. Prerequisites: Anth. 213 and Soc. 185 or the equivalents. 

327. Primitive Political Systems. 4 hours. Examination of data and theory pertinent to 
non- Western political systems; a cross-cultural study of political behavior. 
Prerequisite: Anth. 213. 

330. Primate Evolution. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 330. Paleontology and 
systematics of fossil primates as illuminated by the anatomy, ecology, and 
behavior of the living populations. Prerequisite: Anth. 231 or BioS. 282 or 318. 

331. Human Evolution. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 31. The phylogeny of 
the primate order and the problems of speciation; particular emphasis on the 
relative roles of culture and nature as selective forces in human evolution. 
Prerequisite: Anth. 230 or 231, or BioS. 282 or 318. 

350. Problems in Prehistoric Archaeology. 4 to 12 hours. May be repeated for credit up 
to a total of 12 hours. Archaeological field techniques and principles of the study 
of prehistory. Case studies from selected areas of the Old and New Worlds. 
Prerequisites: 12 hours of archaeology and consent of the instructor. 

351. Prehistory of the Near East. 4 hours. Consideration of southwestern Asia and 
northeastern Africa as the core area in which the first civilizations emerged. 
Emphasis on the late Quaternary to about 5000 B.C.; the interrelationships 
between changing environment, human ecology, and cultural evolution. Prereq- 
uisite: Anth. 251 or consent of the instructor for qualified students from other 
departments. 

352. Early Civilization of the Old World. 4 hours. Early civilization and incipient 
urbanization in Eurasia and Africa, with focus on the development of urban 
centers and archaic states; attention to preconditioning factors in the post- 
Pleistocene, Mesolithic, and Neolithic Ages. Prerequisite: Anth. 251 or 351. 

355. Field Problems in Archaeology. 6 to 12 hours. Application of advanced 
techniques to the solution of special problems of archaeological field investi- 
gations; laboratory analysis under field conditions at an off-campus location. 
Prerequisites: Anth. 253 or 255 or concurrent registration in Anth. 255 and 
consent of the instructor. 

361. Problems in Mesoamerican Ethnology. 4 hours. Intensive investigation of selected 
problems from the Mesoamerican area; special emphasis on religion, economics, 



ANTHROPOLOGY 47 



and social organization. Prerequisites: Anth. 261 and a reading knowledge of 
Spanish. 

362. Problems in African Ethnology. 4 hours. Survey of the indigenous cultures of 
Africa; native cultures as reconstructed coterminous with their early historical 
contacts with the Western world; some additional data on present-day African 
cultures. Prerequisite: Anth. 263. 

363. Urban Cultures of Africa. 4 hours. The indigenous urban centers of sub-Saharan 
Africa and the multicultural and multiracial metropolitan areas of colonial and 
contemporary Africa; special reference to the processes of segregation and 
detribalization. Prerequisite: Anth. 263 or 362. 

364. Problems in North American Ethnology. 4 hours. Intensive reading and research 
focusing on special problems of religious, economic, and social systems of New 
World native peoples. Prerequisite: Anth. 264. 

365. Problems in Pacific Ethnology. 4 hours. Ethnological survey of the indigenous 
peoples of Micronesia, Polynesia, Melanesia, and Australia; special emphasis on 
the social, economic, and religious life of representative groups. Prerequisite: 8 
hours of social anthropology. 

368. Problems in European Ethnology. 4 hours. Advanced reading and research in the 
ethnology of rural Europe; study in depth of selected case materials. Emphasis on 
community structure, kinship, religious and economic systems, and methods of 
social control; research techniques and the nature of source materials. Prereq- 
uisite: Anth. 213. 

380. Problems in Linguistic Analysis. 4 hours. Same as Linguistics 380. Examination of 
the methods and techniques used in linguistics, with reference to actual language 
data; emphasis on anthropological applications. Prerequisite: Anth. 280 or Ling. 
315. 

395. Seminar in Anthropology. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. 
Reading, study, and discussion of selected problems. For graduate students and 
majors in anthropology; open, with the approval of the department, to seniors 
minoring in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

399. Independent Study. 2 to 12 hours. May be repeated for credit. Independent study 
under the supervision of a staff member. Prerequisite: Approval of the 
department. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

400. Theory and Method in Social Anthropology. 4 hours. Survey of contemporary 
and historical approaches to problems of field and library research. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 



48 ANTHROPOLOGY 



410. Advanced Study of Kinship. 4 hours. Investigation of patrilineal, matrilineal, and 
bilateral kinship systems; the correlations between kinship systems and social 
structure; the relationships of ecological factors and kinship organization to rural 
and urban communities. Reading and research on special problems of kinship, 
marriage, residence, inheritance, authority patterns, and change. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

414. Psychological Anthropology. 4 hours. Advanced work on the relationships 
between the psyche, culture, and society; special reference to cross-cultural 
investigations. Problems of methodology. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

427. Political Anthropology. 4 hours. Problems in analysis and description of 
non-Western political systems and their articulation into modern state systems. 
The relationship of the levels of political complexity to theories of political 
behavior. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



430. Theory and Method in Physical Anthropology. 4 hours. Genetics and selection as 
correlated with the adaptive radiation of the primates, particularly the biological, 
environmental, and cultural factors associated with the evolution of man. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

450. Theory and Method in Prehistory. 4 hours. Aims and methods of archaeological 
reconstruction; particular attention to paleoecology, the interpretation of 
archaeological findings in social terms, and the application of scientific knowledge 
from other fields to archaeological problems. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

480. Seminar in Sociolinguistics. 4 hours. Same as Linguistics 480. Past and current 
approaches to sociolinguistics; variations of linguistic structure with social 
structure among different linguistic groups. Prerequisite: Anth. 380. 

490. Seminar on Comparative Social Institutions in Western and Non- Western 
Societies. 4 hours. May be repeated twice for credit. Each seminar will select for 
intensive study a single problem relating to such social institutions as social 
stratification, political organization, warfare, or religion. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 

491. Seminar in Ethnology. 4 hours. May be repeated twice for credit. Advanced 
seminar in the analysis of ethnological data, focusing on the interpretation of field 
data from selected geographic regions and on correlated theoretical problems. 
Prerequisite: Anth. 400. 

492. Readings in the Ethnography of Ethiopia. 4 hours. May be repeated twice for 
credit. For advanced students in social anthropology. Guided study in the social 
anthropology of Ethiopian tribal societies; special consideration of the central 
Ethiopians and western Cushites, the pastoral complex, tribes of the Rift Valley 
lakes. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 49 



495. Developmental Sources of Anthropological Theory. 4 hours. Seminar on the 
sources relevant to the current and historical development of anthropological 
theory primarily as they derive from interaction among the subfields of 
anthropology but also as these influence, and are influenced by, other disciplines. 
Prerequisites: Anth. 400; and 414, 430, or 450. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent 
of the student's adviser. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Professors: Elmer B. Hadley, Head of the Department; Donald A. Eggert, 
Sidney F. Glassman, Bernard Greenberg, Helene N. Guttman, Marion T. Hall, 
Robert F. Inger, Albert S. Rouffa, Stanley K. Shapiro, Rolf Singer (Visiting), 
Eliot B. Spiess 

Associate Professors: Louise Anderson, David Bardack, Howard E. Buhse, Jr., 
M.A.Q. Khan, David B. Mertz, Darrel L. Murray, John A. Nicolette, Jack H. 
Prost, Charles N. Spirakis, Thomas N. Taylor, Robert B. Willey 

Assistant Professors: James A. Bond, Shepley S.C. Chen, Michael R. 
Cummings, Merrill Gassman, Manuel Goldman, David G. Penney, Thomas W. 
Seale, Spencer A. Tomb, Ruth L. Willey 

The Department of Biological Sciences offers work leading to the Master 
of Science in Biology. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree 
from an accredited college or university and a grade-point average of at least 
3.750 (A=5.000) for the last 90 quarter hours of undergraduate study. A 
student whose average is between 3.500 and 3.750 may petition for 
consideration. 

Applicants must have 30 quarter hours in biological sciences, excluding 
100-level (introductory) courses, that indicate a broad, well-balanced selec- 
tion of courses in biology. 

Collateral Requirements: Chemistry (including two quarters of organic 
chemistry, one year each of physics and mathematics, preferably including 
introductory calculus. Deficiencies determined by the Graduate Committee 
of the Department of Biological Sciences and the student's adviser must be 
made up early in the student's residence. 



50 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Applicants who have majored in fields other than biological sciences are 
encouraged to contact the department prior to making formal application for 
admission. 

All students who apply for admission must submit the following: 

A completed application form. 

Complete transcripts of undergraduate (and any graduate) course 

work. 

Three letters of recommendation, preferably from professors who are 

familiar with the student's recent work. 

A statement of about 250 words presenting the applicant's reasons for 

desiring to take graduate work in biological sciences and the 

relationship of this work to his professional and other goals. 

Graduate Record Examination for both the Aptitude Test and the 

Advanced Test in his major field. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

300. Seminar. to 1 hour. Faculty and visiting biologists discuss results of their 
research programs before staff and students at weekly meetings. Attendance of 
majors at all meetings is strongly encouraged. Prerequisite: Biological sciences 
major. 

303. Quantitative Biology I. 5 hours. Quantitative ideas and mathematical models in 
the development of biological theory and as a basis for biological experimentation. 
Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Math. 131 and BioS. 240 or 315. 

304. Cytology Laboratory. 3 hours. Advanced cytology; emphasis on instrumental 
methods. Prerequisites: BioS. 261 and concurrent registration in BioS. 309. 

305. Quantitative Biology II. 5 hours. Formal aspects of biological experimentation, 
including the basic aspects of experimental design; interpretation of biological 
data. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 303. 

307. Biological Methods for Teachers. 3 hours. Investigation of methodological subject 
matter, conducted primarily as a practicum; emphasis on the development of 
competencies. Prerequisite: 40 hours of biological sciences. 

309. Cytology. 3 hours. Structure and function of cells as revealed through historical 
development and modern research techniques. Lecture. Prerequisite: Two years of 
biological sciences. 

313. Developmental Biology. 4 hours. Principles governing growth and differentiation 
at molecular, fine structural, cellular, and organismic levels. Lecture and 
laboratory. Prerequisite: One year of biological sciences. 

315. Principles of Ecology. 3 hours. Composition and distribution of biotic communi- 
ties, plant and animal; emphasis on the interplay of physical and biological factors 
of the environment. Prerequisites: One year of biological sciences and concurrent 
registration in BioS. 324 or 380. 



Supplement to Graduate Study 

Chicago circle bulletin Errata 

Vol. 6 No. 4 August 15, 1971 p 5 q 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



Degree Requirements 



Hours: 48 quarter hours of approved graduate work of which at least 18 
must be in 400-level courses. 

Thesis: Candidates must submit an acceptable thesis and pass a 
comprehensive final examination. A maximum of 16 quarter hours in 
Biological Sciences 499, Thesis Research, may be credited. Candidates whose 
interests lie in secondary education may be exempted from the thesis 
requirement at the option of the department. In lieu of the thesis, they will 
substitute satisfactory performance on the oral comprehensive examination 
and 4 to 12 quarter hours of Biological Sciences 493, Problems in Modern 
Biology. 



Comprehensive Examination: Oral; the candidate must demonstrate 
competence in two of the three areas of specialization and familiarity 
(satisfiable by A or B grades in approved courses) with the third. Candidates 
electing a thesis must take an oral examination, administered by a committee 
including members of his advisory committee, which tests the candidate on 
his general biological knowledge and on the purpose and content of his thesis. 

Degree candidates are urged to achieve competence in at least one modern 
foreign language and to register for courses in calculus, statistics, and 
biochemistry. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 51 



Invertebrate Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Geological Sciences 316. Phylogeny, 
morphology, and ecology of the fossil invertebrates. Prerequisites: BioS. 218 and 
consent of the instructor. 

Vertebrate Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Geological Sciences 318. Phylogeny, 
morphology, and ecology of the fossil vertebrates. Prerequisites: BioS. 281 and 
consent of the instructor. 

Paleobotany. 5 hours. Same as Geological Sciences 319. Structure, phylogeny, 
and stratigraphic distribution of representative fossil plants. Lecture, laboratory, 
and field trips. Prerequisite: One year of biological sciences. 

Field Botany. 5 hours. Flora of the Chicago region. Lecture, laboratory, field 
trips. Prerequisite: One year of biological sciences. 

Plant Geography of North America. 4 hours. Ecological and systematic treatment 
of vegetation regions and principal subdivisions; emphasis on environmental 
factors and floras. Prerequisite: BioS. 220 or 315. 

Plant Ecology Laboratory. 2 hours. Special attention to vegetation and 
environment of the Chicago region. Laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: 
Concurrent registration in BioS. 315. 

Plant Anatomy. 4 hours. Examination of the internal structure of vascular plants; 
emphasis on structure and function. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: One 
year of college biology or the equivalent. 

Plant Physiology I. 3 hours. Photobiology of photosynthesis, photosynthetic 
carbon metabolism, formation of the photochemical apparatus, and respiration. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 261 or the equivalent. 

Plant Physiology II. 3 hours. Water relations, translocation of solutes, growth, 
flowering, and phytohormones. Prerequisite: BioS. 261 or the equivalent. 

Plant Physiology Laboratory I. 2 hours. Laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: 
BioS. 261 or the equivalent and concurrent registration in BioS. 326. 

Plant Physiology Laboratory II. 2 hours. Laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: 
BioS. 261 or the equivalent and concurrent registration in BioS. 327. 



Primate Evolution. 4 hours. Same as Anthropology 330. Paleontology and 
systematics of fossil primates as illuminated by the anatomy, ecology, and 
behavior of the living populations. Prerequisite: Anth, 231 or BioS. 282 or 318. 

Human Evolution. 4 hours. Same as Anthropology 331. Phylogeny of the primate 
order and the problems of speciation; particular emphasis on the relative roles of 
culture and nature as selective forces in human evolution. Prerequisite: Anth. 230 
or 231, or BioS. 282 or 318. 



52 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



332 Morphogenesis in Higher Plants. 3 hours. Morphogenesis, growth, and differen- 
tiation of vascular plants and bryophytes. Emphasis on experimental approaches 
to plant development at the molecular, cellular, and organismic levels. Lecture. 
Prerequisites: Ghem. 234 and BioS. 313 or 33. 

333. Morphology of Vascular Plants. 4 hours. Structure, reproduction, and evolu- 
tionary history of representative vascular plants, including psilopsids, lycopsids, 
sphenopsids, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: One year of biological sciences. 

342. Cytogenetics. 4 hours. Chromosomal phenomena involved in the mechanics of 
genetics, structure of genetic material, and the role chromosomal variation plays 
in the evolution of races and species. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 
240. 

343. Population Genetics. 3 hours. Genetic dynamics for animal, plant, and human 
populations: mating systems, selection, sampling, and mutation. Lecture and 
recitation. Prerequisites: BioS. 240, Math. 130, and credit or concurrent 
registration in statistics. 

344. Experimental Population Genetics. 3 hours. Discussion of experimental and field 
empirical studies estimating genetic parameters, influence of selection, and other 
evolutionary forces on genotypes in populations. Lecture, laboratory, and 
discussion. Prerequisite: BioS. 343. 

345. Systematics and Evolution. 3 hours. Consideration of principles and interrelation- 
ships; basic analysis of evolutionary mechanisms; rationale for classification 
systems; nature of taxonomic characters. Lecture and discussion. Prerequisites: 
One year of biological sciences and BioS. 240. 

347. Physiological Genetics. 3 hours. Consideration of heredity at the biochemical 
level; particular reference to mutation, the transcription and translation of genetic 
information, and genetic regulatory mechanisms. Lecture. Prerequisites: BioS. 
240 and Chem. 350. 

349. Evolutionary Theory. 3 hours. Analysis of evolutionary mechanisms in plants and 
animals; variation and differentiation in populations and species; origins of 
superspecific taxa. Prerequisites: BioS. 3 15 and 345. 

350. Advanced Microbiology. 5 hours. Modern contributions to the cellular anatomy, 
physiology, and genetics of microorganisms. Lecture and laboratory. Prereq- 
uisites: BioS. 250 or 261, and credit or registration in biochemistry. Calculus is 
strongly recommended. 

351. Principles of Cell and Tissue Culture. 5 hours. Methods for primary isolation of 
plant and animal tissue and subsequent cultivation. Uses of cells in cultures as 
experimental tools. Prerequisites: BioS. 250 and 261. 

353. Chemical Biogenesis. 4 hours. Same as Chemistry 353. Biosynthesis of important 
biological compounds. Lecture and discussion. Prerequisite: Chem. 134 or 234. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 53 



356. Mycology. 4 hours. Analysis of the morphology, physiology, and genetics of fungi 
as related to the taxonomy and phylogeny of fungi. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: One year of biological sciences. 

359. Neuroanatomy. 5 hours. Introduction to the neurological organization of the 
mammalian central nervous system. Prerequisites: BioS. 280 and consent of the 
instructor. 

361. Macromolecules of Biological Importance. 5 hours. Nucleic acids and proteins; 
emphasis on their roles in the replication of genetic material. Lecture and 
laboratory. Prerequisites: A course in organic chemistry and consent of the 
instructor. 

363. Animal Physiology I. 5 hours. Same as Information Engineering 383. The role of 
the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and osmoexcretory systems in the 
maintenance of organismic homeostasis. Emphasis on vertebrates. Lecture and 
laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 261. 

364. Animal Physiology II. 5 hours. Same as Information Engineering 384. The role of 
the muscular, sensory, nervous, and endocrine systems in the maintenance of 
organismic integration. Emphasis on vertebrates. Lecture and laboratory. Prereq- 
uisite: BioS. 261. 

366. Microbial Physiology I. 5 hours. Organization of physiological processes in various 
groups of microorganisms: comparative biochemistry of energy-yielding mecha- 
nisms; biosynthesis of macromolecules; ecological implications of microbial 
metabolism. Lecture, discussion, laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 250 or the 
equivalent. 

370. Biochemistry I. 4 hours. Same as Chemistry 350. Chemistry of biological systems, 
including proteins and enzymes. Prerequisites: Ghem. 119 or 121 and credit or 
registration in Chem. 235. 

371. Biochemistry II. 4 hours. Same as Chemistry 351. Continues Biological Sciences 

370. Carbohydrate and lipide metabolism. Electron transport. Prerequisite: BioS. 
370. 

372. Biochemistry III. 4 hours. Same as Chemistry 352. Continues Biological Sciences 

371. Metabolism of amino acids, nucleic acids, proteins, and the biosynthesis of 
biological macromolecules. Prerequisite: BioS. 371. 

375. Comparative Vertebrate Physiology I. 4 hours. Comparison of selected 
physiological adaptations of various vertebrate groups to the factors of the 
environment at the whole animal and organ system levels. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 363 or 384. 

377. Endocrinology. 5 hours. Animal hormones in the control of integration, 
homeostasis, growth, and development. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: 
BioS. 364. 



54 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



380. Animal Ecology Laboratory. 2 hours. Population and community assemblages of 
the Chicago region. Laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: Concurrent 
registration in BioS. 315. 

382. Environmental Conservation. 3 hours. Applied ecology of the use of renewable 
natural resources; special emphasis on biotic problems of land, water, and air 
management; pollution, population increase, multiple-use concept, and land 
ethics. Lecture and field trips. Prerequisites: BioS. 315, and 324 or 380. 

384. Invertebrate Zoology I. 5 hours. Comparative study of structure, development, 
behavior, classification, and evolution of the lower invertebrate groups. Lecture 
and laboratory. Prerequisite: One year of biological sciences. 

385. Invertebrate Zoology II. 5 hours. Comparative study of structure, development, 
classification, and evolution of the higher invertebrate groups exclusive of 
arthropods. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 384. 

388. General Entomology. 5 hours. Introduction to the morphology, physiology, 
classification, behavior, and evolution of insects. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 1 2 hours of biological sciences. 

389. Principles of Protozoology. 5 hours. Introduction to the comparative 
morphology, physiology, and systematics of the protozoa, including discussion of 
advances in major areas of current research. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: 
One year of biological sciences. 

393. Functional Animal Morphology. 4 hours. Functional analysis of selected 
invertebrate and vertebrate organ systems applied to problems of comparative 
structure, adaptation, and phylogeny. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

395. Zoogeography. 3 hours. Examination of present and past distribution of animals; 
emphasis on physiographic and ecologic factors which affect the development of 
faunal regions. Experimental methods to elucidate mechanisms of origin and 
diversification of island and continental faunas. 

397. Biology of Lower Vertebrates. 4 hours. Experimental and descriptive studies on 
fishes, amphibians, and reptiles; emphasis on ecology, speciation, and adaptive 
radiation. Lecture, laboratory, and field trips. Prerequisite: Any one of BioS. 218, 
240, 280 or 281. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Foundations of Biological Thought. 4 hours. Presentation and analysis of some of 
the fundamental concepts of the mainstreams of biological thought. 

402. Patterns of Biological Enquiry. 4 hours. Contemporary and developing ideas in 
biology, utilizing blocks of integrated research papers to analyze the functioning 
of selected ideas as they influence the design, execution, and interpretation of 
research problems. Prerequisite: BioS. 401. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 55 



Enquiry Processes in the Classroom. 4 hours. The insights derived from Biological 
Sciences 401 and 402 are used in preparing inquiry-oriented materials for 
presentation in the classroom. Prerequisite: BioS. 402. 

Methods in Cellular Physiology. 2 to 5 hours. Analytical techniques and 
instrumentation used in microbiology, cell biology, and physiology. Practical and 
theoretical problems associated with these techniques are considered. 
Prerequisites: Cellular biodynamics or equivalent, and biochemistry or concurrent 
registration in biochemistry. 

Biological Ultrastructure. 5 hours. Discussion, instrumentation, and special topics 
in fine structure of plant and animal cells and cell products. Prerequisites: BioS. 
261, 309, organic chemistry, and consent of the instructor. 

Histochemistry. 5 hours. Analysis of cell and tissue structure by histochemical 
methods. Prerequisites: BioS. 261, 309, Chem. 234, and consent of the instructor. 

Discussions in Paleobiology. 1 hour. May be repeated for credit. Consideration of 
selected topics and current research literature in paleobiology. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

Problems in Evolutionary Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Geological Sciences 
413. Seminar on current problems. Discussion of evidence and mechanisms of 
change, such as rates of evolution, population structure, and extinction as shown 
by the vertebrate fossil record. Prerequisites: BioS. 218 and 305. Biological 
Sciences 345 is recommended. 



415. Principles of Morphogenesis. 4 hours. Analysis of factors controlling growth and 
differentiation in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Prerequisites: BioS. 240 
and 313. 

416. Evolution of Pteridophytes. 4 hours. Basic structure and major features of 
evolution of lycopods, sphenopsids, and ferns. Prerequisite: BioS. 333 or the 
equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 

417. Evolution of Gymnosperms. 4 hours. Basic structure and major features of 
evolution of naked seeded plants. Prerequisites: BioS, 333 or the equivalent, and 
consent of the instructor. 

418. Angiosperm Morphology. 4 hours. Basic structure and major features of evolution 
within the flowering plants. Prerequisites: BioS. 333 or the equivalent, and 
consent of the instructor. 

419. Topics in the Morphology and Evolution of Plants. 1 hour. Seminar. Prerequisites: 
BioS. 333 or the equivalent; 416, 417, or 418, and consent of the instructor. 

420. Advanced Vertebrate Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Geological Sciences 420. 
Given as three different courses. May be repeated twice for credit. Advanced 
treatment of the functional morphology, paleoecology, and phylogeny of the 
various vertebrate groups: fishes, amphibians and reptiles, and mammals. 
Prerequisites: BioS. 282 and 318. 



56 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



422. Physiological Ecology of Plants. 4 hours. Physiological investigation of climatic 
and edaphic differentiation; emphasis on the ecophysiological adaptations of 
species to their environments. Prerequisites: BioS. 315, 324, or 380, and one 
quarter of plant physiology. 

423. Discussions in Ecology and Behavior. 2 hours. May be repeated for credit up to 8 
hours. Consideration of selected topics, current literature, and recent advances in 
ecology and behavior. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

424. Advanced Paleobotany. 4 hours. Problems in the structure and phylogeny of 
representative fossil plant groups. Lecture, laboratory, occasional field trip. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 319. 

426. Biochemical Systematics. 4 hours. Analysis of the utilization of comparative 
biochemical data in determining evolutionary relationships among groups of plants 
and animals. Prerequisites: BioS. 345 and 353. 

427. Advanced Taxonomy of Flowering Plants. 4 hours. Emphasis on theories and data 
for evolution within groups of flowering plants. Prerequisites: BioS. 345 and 
consent of the instructor. 

428. Intermediary Metabolism in Plants. 3 hours. Pathways of carbon metabolism, 
enzymes involved, and control mechanisms. Prerequisite: BioS. 329 or Chem. 
351. 

429. Topics in Systematic Botany. 4 hours. Specialized systematic studies of the larger, 
more important families of flowering plants. Lecture, laboratory, and field trips. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 220 or 315 or 345. 

430. Population Ecology. 3 hours. The ecology of plant and animal populations. Life 
histories and population growth, competition, predator-prey systems, population 
movement, and ecological genetics; emphasis on populational modeling. Prereq- 
uisites: BioS. 240, 315, 324 or 380, and consent of the instructor. 

436. Photobiology. 3 hours. Photobiological processes, including vision, photosyn- 
thesis, ultraviolet light as a mutagen, bioluminescence, phototropisms, and 
photomorphogenesis. Basic techniques in photobiological research. Prerequisites: 
BioS. 328, 329, and consent of the instructor. 

437. Organelle Biogensis. 3 hours. May be repeated once for credit. Organization, 
development, and reproduction of plastids and mitochondria, including growth, 
differentiation, continuity, genetics, and autonomy; origin and evolutionary 
significance of these organelles. Prerequisites: BioS. 261, Chem. 351 or the 
equivalent, and consent of the instructor. 

438. Experimental Plant Systematics. 4 hours. Evolutionary mechanisms and pathways 
in higher plants; analysis of genetic chromosomal, morphological, and physiolo- 
gical properties of natural assemblages at and below the species level of 
divergence. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BioS. 342 and 349. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 57 



440. Seminar in Genetics. 2 hours. Discussion of research literature in the field. 
Student topics assigned. Prerequisites: BioS. 240 and consent of the instructor. 

442. Problems in Population Genetics. 3 hours. Lecture and discussion of research 
literature in the field. Prerequisites: BioS. 343 and 344. 

445. Discussion in Systematics and Evolution. 1 hour. Consideration of current 
literature and of recent advances in the field of systematic biology. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

446. Developmental Genetics. 4 hours. Principles of genome function during gameto- 
genesis and the onset of differentiation; patterns and mechanisms of gene 
regulation in differentiated cells. Prerequisites: BioS. 240 and 313. 

449. Virology. 3 hours. Nature of viruses and their morphology, chemical composition, 
assay, host-parasite interactions, and life cycles. Prerequisite: BioS. 351. 



450. Topics in Microbial Physiology. 4 hours. Modern contributions to microbiology, 
including the ultrastructure of the bacterial cell, metabolism and control 
mechanisms, bacterial genetics and cell-viral systems. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 350. 

451. Insect Microbiology. 5 hours. Host microbe associations and their commensal, 
pathogenic, and other interactions. Virus, protozoan, and bacterial associations. 
Prerequisites: BioS. 250 and 388. 

452. Insect Physiology. 5 hours. Structure, function, and adaptive aspects of the insect 
exoskeleton and organ systems; growth, differentiation, and reproduction. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 388. 

455. Topics in Molecular Biology. 3 hours. May be repeated for credit. Selected topics 
emphasizing molecular studies involved in such diverse biological areas as virology, 
genetics, immunology, photobiology, pharmacology, exobiology. Prerequisites: 
BioS. 240, 250, 261, and consent of the instructor. 

456. Bacterial Photosynthesis. 3 hours. Structure and function of the photochemical 
apparatus in the photosynthetic bacteria; photosynthetic carbon, nitrogen, 
hydrogen, and sulfur metabolism in the bacteria. Prerequisites: BioS. 250, 328, 
and 329. 

468. Microbial Physiology II. 4 hours. Biochemistry of growth of microorganisms; 
formation of various microbial structures; biosynthesis of major cellular constit- 
uents; metabolic regulation; kinetics of microbial growth. Lecture, discussion, 
laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 366. 

471. Comparative Vertebrate Physiology II. 4 hours. Comparison of selected physiolo- 
gical adaptations of various vertebrate groups to the factors of the environment at 
the tissue and cellular levels. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 470. 



58 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, CHEMISTRY 

472. Experimental Animal Physiology. 4 hours. May be repeated once for credit. 
Selected topics in experimental surgery and pharmacodynamics. Prerequisite: 
BioS. 363 or 364. 

473. Comparative Invertebrate Physiology. 5 hours. Adaptive mechanisms of inverte- 
brate animals in their major kinds of habitats. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 385. 

474. Advanced Invertebrate Physiology. 5 hours. Detailed study of the physiology of 
respiration and metamorphosis in invertebrates and of their adaptations in toxic 
environments. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: BioS. 473. 

486. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. 4 hours. Selected topics in currently advancing 
areas of descriptive and experimental invertebrate zoology. Emphasis on recent 
comparative research in such areas as behavior, embryogenesis, circadian rhythms, 
and ecological adaptations. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BioS. 385 or 
470 and consent of the instructor. 

489. Advanced Protozoology. 4 hours. Consideration of selected topics in modern 
protozoological research. Prerequisite: BioS. 389. 

490. Problems in Vertebrate Morphology. 4 hours. Feeding and locomotory 
mechanisms of selected vertebrates. Dissection, experimentation, and seminar 
presentation of analyzed results. Laboratory and discussion. Prerequisite: BioS. 
393 or the equivalent. 

492. Seminars in Biology. 1 to 3 hours. Seminars in selected aspects of biological 
sciences. 

493. Problems in Modern Biology. 2 to 8 hours. May be repeated for credit. Not to be 
used for thesis research. Guided study of selected topics with research potential in 
specific fields of advanced modern biology. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

495. Graduate Seminar. No credit. Thesis presentation by advanced students; 
occasional seminar by staff and invited speakers. Required of graduate students 
every quarter. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Work in a number of 
fields offered under the direction of faculty members with appropriate graduate 
standing. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professors: William F. Sager, Head of the Department; Bernard J. Babler, 
Joseph H. Boyer, Thomas H. Brown, Richard L. Carlin, Charles K. Hunt, Chui 
F. Liu, Clifford N. Matthews, Robert M. Moriarty, Jan Rocek, Robert I. 
Walter 



CHEMISTRY 59 



Associate Professors: Ronald J. Baumgarten, Richard P. Burns, Jacques 
Kagan, J. Victor Mansfield, Samuel Schrage 

Assistant Professors: Benedict W. Bangerter, Wade A. Freeman, Eric A. 
Gislason, David Gorenstein, Anatol Gottlieb, Cynthia J. Jameson, Richard 
Kassner, Rosalind A. Klaas, Florence C. Klee, Leonard Kotin, John J. Steiner, 
Robert F. Zahrobsky 

Work toward the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy is 
offered in inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have fulfilled the course requirements leading to a 
bachelor's degree with a major in chemistry and must have a 4.000 
grade-point average in mathematics and science courses. Students with lower 
averages may apply and will be considered individually. Applicants who have 
majored in fields other than chemistry may be admitted to graduate study in 
chemistry on an individual basis. 



Degree Requirements 



Master of Science 

Hours: 48 quarter hours, of which 32 must be within the Department 
of Chemistry. The remaining 16 hours may be selected from the offerings of 
other departments on the basis of their relevance to a particular area of 
interest. Course work in other departments will be strongly recommended 
when it is judged advisable for the student's best professional development. 
At least 16 quarter hours must be taken at the 400 level, of which 12 must be 
selected from the course offerings of the Department of Chemistry. 

All M.S. candidates are required to participate in undergraduate 
teaching, which will be assigned in individual cases according to background 
and interest. A minimum of 16 quarter hours is required. 

Thesis: Optional; up to 18 quarter hours of thesis research may be 
credited, subject to the approval of the department. 



60 CHEMISTRY 



Doctor of Philosophy 

In addition to satisfying the general requirements of the Graduate 
College, students must pass a set of departmental cumulative examinations. 
The only specific courses required of all candidates are Chemistry 404, 405, 
and 406, which provide a foundation for the areas of specialization. All other 
formal course work is determined, with the advice of the department, 
according to its relevance to the student's field of interest. 

Thesis: Candidates must prepare a thesis based upon original research 
carried out under the direction of a qualified member of the department and 
approved by an examination committee. 

All candidates must meet the department foreign language require- 
ment. 

Prospective candidates may obtain detailed information concerning all 
requirements by applying to the Department of Chemistry. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

314. Inorganic Chemistry. 4 hours. Lectures and assigned readings on the chemistry of 
selected elements. Prerequisite: Chem. 340. 

315. Inorganic Chemistry. 4 hours. Lectures and assigned readings in structural organic 
chemistry, inorganic reaction mechanisms and techniques, and the nature of the 
coordinate bond. Prerequisite: Chem. 342 or the equivalent. 

316. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 2 hours. Synthesis of inorganic compounds 
illustrating the use of modern preparative techniques. Prerequisite: Credit or 
registration in Chem. 315. 

321. Chemical and Instrumental Analysis I. 5 hours. Chemical and instrumental 
methods of analysis and their application to the quantitative study of chemical 
reactions. Prerequisites: Chem. 235 and credit or registration in Chem. 343 or the 
equivalents. 

322. Chemical and Instrumental Analysis II. 3 hours. Continues Chemistry 321. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 321. 

338. Systematic Identification of Organic Compounds. 3 hours. Primarily a laboratory 
course; chemical, physical, and spectroscopic methods are used to separate, 
purify, and identify organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chem. 237. 

339. Organic Synthesis. 2 to 4 hours. Discussion and laboratory work involving special 
techniques in organic synthesis. Prerequisite: Chem. 237 or the equivalent. 

340. Physical Chemistry I. 4 hours. Credit is not given for both the Chemistry 340, 
342, 344 sequence and the 380-382 sequence. Introduction to the study of 



CHEMISTRY 61 



chemical principles. Prerequisites: Chem. 119 or 121, credit or registration in 
Math. 133, and one year of college physics. 

341. Physical Chemistry Laboratory I. 2 hours. Quantitative experimental study of 
chemical principles. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chem. 340. 

342. Physical Chemistry II. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 340. Prerequisite: Chem. 
340. 

343. Physical Chemistry Laboratory II. 3 hours. Continues Chemistry 341. Prereq- 
uisites: Chem. 341 and concurrent registration in Chem. 342. 

344. Physical Chemistry HI. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 342. Prerequisite: Chem. 
342. 

345. Physical Chemistry Laboratory III. 2 hours. Continues Chemistry 343. Prereq- 
uisites: Chem. 343 and concurrent registration in Chem. 344. 

347. Introduction to Quantum Chemistry. 4 hours. Applications of quantum 
mechanics to problems of chemical interest. Additional assignments are required. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 344. 

348. Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Lectures and assigned readings; applications to 
chemical systems. Prerequisite: Chem. 344. 

349. Statistical Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Introduction to statistical mechanics and 
application to equilibrium thermodynamics. Prerequisite: Chem. 344. 

350. Biochemistry I. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 370. Chemistry of biological 
systems, including proteins and enzymes. Prerequisites: Chem. 119 or 121 and 
credit or registration in Chem. 235. 

351. Biochemistry II. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 371. Continues Chemistry 

350. Carbohydrate and lipide metabolism. Electron transport. Prerequisite: Chem. 
350. 

352. Biochemistry III. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 372. Continues Chemistry 

351. Metabolism of amino acids, nucleic acids, and proteins; the biosynthesis of 
biological macromolecules. Prerequisite: Chem. 351. 

353. Chemical Biogenesis. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 353. Biosynthesis of 
important biological compounds. Prerequisite: Chem. 134 or 234. 

355. Biochemistry Laboratory I. 2 hours. Introduction to experimentation with 
biochemical systems, processes, and compounds of biochemical importance. 
Prerequisite: Registration in Chem. 350. 

357. Biochemistry Laboratory II. 2 hours. Continues Chemistry 355. Prerequisites: 
Chem. 355 and registration in Chem. 351. 



62 CHEMISTRY 



361. Advanced Organic Chemistry I. 4 hours. A physical-organic approach to organic 
reactions with particular emphasis on reaction mechanisms and the relationship 
between reactivity and structure. Lectures and assigned readings. Prerequisites: 
Chem. 235 and 344. 

362. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 361. Lectures and 
assigned readings. Prerequisite: Chem. 361. 

380. Principles of Physical Chemistry I. 3 hours. Credit is not given for both the 
Chemistry 380-382 sequence and the 340-342-344 sequence. Chemistry 380 and 
382 provide an elementary introduction to physical chemistry; particular 
emphasis on topics of importance in the biological and health sciences. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 119 or 121, calculus, and two quarters of physics. 

382. Principles of Physical Chemistry II. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 380. Prereq- 
uisite: Chem. 380. 

383. Elementary Physical Chemistry Laboratory. 1 hour. An introductory course. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 380. 

384. Surface and Macromolecular Chemistry. 4 hours. Interfacial phenomena, stability 
of disperse systems, properties of polymer solutions. Prerequisites: Chem. 382 or 
the equivalent and consent of the instructor. 

385. Surface and Macromolecular Laboratory. 2 hours. Techniques in surface and 
macromolecular chemistry. Prerequisites: Credit or registration in Chem. 384 and 
consent of the instructor. 

399. Independent Study. 3 hours or more. May be repeated for credit. Supervised 
study in an area not represented by regularly offered courses. Prerequisite: 
Written approval of the department. 

Courses for Graduate Students 

404. Quantum Mechanics. 4 hours. Exact solution of the Schrodinger equation for 
simple systems; variational principle; approximation methods in complex systems; 
effects of electric and magnetic fields. Required of all Ph.D. students in 
chemistry. 

405. Molecular Spectroscopy. 4 hours. Analysis and interpretation of molecular 
spectra, including electronic, vibrational, magnetic resonance and Mossbauer 
spectra. Required of all Ph.D. students in chemistry. 

406. Chemical Applications of Group Theory. 4 hours. Introduction to the use of 
group-theoretical methods in the analysis of spectroscopic problems; ligand and 
crystal field theory; molecular orbital calculations. Required of all Ph.D. students 
in chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem. 405. 

410. Current Problems in Inorganic Chemistry. 2 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Analysis of fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry as they appear in a 
modem research context. 



CHEMISTRY 63 



412. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. 2 to 4 hours. Lectures on topics not 
represented in regularly scheduled courses. 

413. Physical Methods of Inorganic Chemistry. 4 hours. Application of physico- 
chemical methods to problems in inorganic chemistry. 

414. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. 2 to 4 hours. Experimental methods in synthesis 
and study of inorganic compounds. 

415. Complex Inorganic Compounds. 4 hours. Stereochemistry, reactions, and theory 
of bonding of coordination compounds. 

423. Catalysis in Enzymology. 4 hours. Application of physical organic chemistry to 
the understanding of enzyme action and the mechanisms of biochemical 
reactions. Prerequisites: Chem. 351 and 362. 

425. Bioenergetics. 4 hours. Thermodynamic changes associated with the formation of 
chemical gradients, the transformation of metabolites, oxidation-reduction 
reactions and the synthesis of macromolecules, including detailed consideration of 
mechanisms of oxidative and photophosphorylation. Prerequisites: Ghem. 344 
and 351. 

431. Literature Seminar in Organic Chemistry. 1 hour. Students present papers on 
current research topics; abstracts are prepared and distributed. Discussion is an 
integral part of the course. 

432. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. 4 hours. Discussion of topics of current 
interest. 

433. Special Topics in Reaction Mechanisms. 4 hours. Theory and techniques in 
specialized areas in reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: Chem. 362 or the 
equivalent. 

434. Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. 4 hours. Application of infrared, 
ultraviolet-visible, magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, and mass 
spectrometry and optical rotatory dispersion in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 405. 

435. Advanced Organic Synthesis. 4 hours. Discussion and laboratory work involving 
special techniques in organic synthesis. Prerequisite: Credit or registration in 
Chem. 434. 

436. Chemistry of Natural Products I. 4 hours. Discussion of the more important 
groups of natural products, including their structure determination, synthesis, and 
biogenetical relationships. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: Chem. 235. 

437. Survey of Organic Chemistry I. 4 hours. Topics on synthesis, mechanisms, and 
stereochemistry at an advanced level. 

438. Survey of Organic Chemistry II. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 437. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 437. 



64 ENERGY ENGINEERING 



439. Survey of Organic Chemistry III. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 438. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 438. 

440. Current Problems in Physical Chemistry. 2 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Analysis of fundamental concepts in physical chemistry as they appear in a 
modern research context. 

442. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. 2 to 4 hours. Lectures and reading in areas 
not normally treated in standard courses. Discussions of topics of current interest. 

443. Special Topics in Chemical Kinetics. 2 to 4 hours. Theory and techniques in 
specialized areas of chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: Chem. 349 or the equivalent. 

444. Statistical Mechanics I. 4 hours. Statistical models of systems in thermodynamic 
equilibrium. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: Chem. 349. 

445. Statistical Mechanics II. 4 hours. Statistical models of the liquid state and 
nonequilibrium processes. Prerequisite: Chem. 444. 

446. Quantum Chemistry I. 4 hours. Treatment of complex atoms and molecular 
systems. Hartree-Foch calculations and other methods; interaction of radiation 
matter. Prerequisite: Chem. 406. 

447. Quantum Chemistry II. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 446. Prerequisite: Chem. 
446. 

448. Quantum Chemistry III. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 447. Prerequisite: Chem. 
447. 

46 1 . Synthetic Methods of Organic Chemistry I. 4 hours. Discussion of methods used 
in organic syntheses; introduction and modification of functional groups, 
methods of selective group protection, stereospecific processes, recent examples 
of applications. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry. 

462. Synthetic Methods of Organic Chemistry II. 4 hours. Continues Chemistry 461. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 461. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval 
of the department. 



ENERGY ENGINEERING 

Professors: James P. Hartnett, Head of the Department; Paul M. Chung, 
Norman A. Parker, Satish S. Saxena, Harold A. Simon 

Associate Professors: Lyndon R. Babcock, Jr., Joseph C.F. Chow, Allen C. 
Cogley, David S. Hacker, John H. Kiefer, Wolodymyr J. Minkowycz, Edward 
S. Pierson, Stephen Szepe 



ENERGY ENGINEERING 65 



Assistant Professors: Aemer D. Anderson, John C. Cutting, AH G. Mansoori, 
Kenneth L. Uherka, Calvin J. Wolf 



Degree Requirements 

A grade-point average of at least 4.000 is required. Credit toward a 
graduate degree is not given for any course in which a grade of less than C has 
been obtained. 



Master of Science 

Forty-eight quarter hours are required for the degree, at least 16 of 
which must be in 400-level courses. A student may or may not submit a 
thesis, but in the event a thesis is submitted, 16 hours of Energy Engineering 
499, Thesis Research, will be credited toward the degree. If a thesis is not 
written, the student must complete a research project under the guidance of 
an adviser from the department. This project will entail the submission of a 
report showing to the adviser's satisfaction the ability of the student to 
conduct research at the master's level. Upon completion of this project 4 
hours of credit will be awarded. If the candidate submits a thesis, he is 
exempt from the project; however, he must, at the completion of the thesis, 
defend it before an examining committee. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

All graduate students who plan to pursue the Ph.D. are required to 
pass two out of a maximum of three written cumulative examinations, which 
will be offered twice each year. The successful completion of these two 
cumulative examinations is equivalent to passing the preliminary examina- 
tion. This requirement must be satisfied during the first three years of 
residence if the candidate enters with a bachelor's degree or during the first 
two years if he enters with a master's degree. 

For the Ph.D. a minimum of 96 hours of course work beyond the 
bachelor's degree is required, of which at least 32 hours must consist of 
400-level courses. The total must include a major, the scope of which is to be 
determined by the adviser and the graduate committee of the department, 
and a minor of at least 24 quarter hours. Credit in two courses from the 
Department of Materials Engineering and at least 1 2 quarter hours in courses 
offered by the Department of Mathematics, of which at least three hours 
must be at the 400 level, are required. 

Reading proficiency in German, French, or Russian is required. In 
special cases another foreign language may be substituted if the relevance of 
this language to the student's major area can be convincingly demonstrated. 



66 ENERGY ENGINEERING 



A major requirement of the Ph.D. program is the completion of a 
thesis based on a program of original research. The research is carried out and 
the thesis is written under the supervision of the student's adviser. The thesis 
must be defended before an examining committee. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

304. Transport Phenomena. 4 hours. Introduction to continuum theory of momentum, 
energy, and mass transfer. Transport of scalar and vector quantities* Reynolds' 
transport theorem. General differential equations of transport phenomena. 
Momentum shell balances. Energy transport. Diffusion. Couple operations: free 
convection, simultaneous heat and mass transfer, etc. Prerequisites: EnrE. 201 
and 211. 

305. Statistical Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Statistical formulation; partition functions, 
including quantum effect. Application to macroscopic systems; systems of 
interacting particles. Emphasis on engineering applications. Prerequisites: EnrE. 
201, Math. 220 or the equivalent. 

307. Kinetic Theory of Gases and Transport Phenomena. 4 hours. Basic concepts of 
kinetic theory of gases. Equations of state and their molecular interpretation. 
Elementary classical statistics, molecular collisions. Application of the kinetic 
theory to viscosity, heat conduction, and diffusion. Prerequisite: Completion of 
core program. 

311. Free Surface Flow. 4 hours. Application of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics 
to fluids with a free surface. Channel flow and wind driven waves on the ocean's 
surface. Theory of gravity waves, capillary waves, and related phenomena. 
Prerequisites: EnrE. 212 and 214. 

312. Porous Media. 4 hours. Mechanics of fluid flow in porous media. Steady and 
unsteady laminar flow in isotropic and anisotropic media. Multiphase and 
multilayered systems. Prerequisites: EnrE. 212 and 215. 

313. Aerodynamics of Flight. 4 hours. Lift and drag, both subsonic and supersonic. 
Perturbation problems. Airfoil and slender body theories. Three-dimensional 
wings. Prerequisites: EnrE. 212 and 213. 

314. Propulsion. 4 hours. Thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of air breathing 
engines. Performance of rockets; chemical, nuclear, and electrical. Prerequisites: 
EnrE. 213. 

316. Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. 4 hours. Same as Materials Engineering 
316. Cartesian tensors, kinematics of fluids and solids, conservation equations, 
constitutive equations for simple materials. Examples. Prerequisites: EnrE. 211 or 
MatE. 214, and Math. 220. 

317. Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. 4 hours. Development of the conservation 
equations for a Newtonian fluid: continuity, Navier-Stokes and energy equations. 



ENERGY ENGINEERING 67 



Some exact and approximate solutions of highly viscous, viscous, and inviscid 
flow problems. Prerequisite: Math. 220 or the equivalent. 

321. Intermediate Heat Transfer. 4 hours. Topics in conduction, convection, and 
radiation heat transfer, with special emphasis on the exact solutions of the 
problems. Two-phase flow; heat exchanges, mass transfer cooling; rarefied gas 
analysis. Prerequisites: EnrE. 221 and Math. 220. 

331. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 hours. Review of first and second laws 
with subsequent applications to chemical systems. Free energy, availability, 
equilibrium conditions, and applications to chemical processes. Equilibrium 
constant, chemical potential for gas reactions, heterogeneous systems, and phase 
change. Prerequisite: EnrE. 201 or the equivalent. 

341. Experimental Methods and Techniques. 4 hours. Purpose and design of 
experiments; statistical analysis of errors; wind tunnel, shock tube, high vacuum 
and chemical reactor techniques; theory of mechanical, thermal, optical, and 
chemical measurements. 

351. Electromechanical Energy Conversion I. 4 hours. Conservation of energy, 
electromagnetic forces, applications to linear and nonlinear lumped parameter 
systems, stability. Principles of rotating machines and equations of motion. 
Applications to synchronous, induction, d-c, and novel machines. Prerequisites: 
InfE. 221 and credit or registration in InfE. 311. 

352. Electromechanical Energy Conversion II. 4 hours. Continues Energy Engineering 
351; completion of rotating machines. Interaction of electromagnetic fields with 
stationary and moving continuous media, Maxwell stress tensor, and waves and 
instabilities. Applications to energy conversion with emphasis on fluids (magneto- 
hydrodynamics). Prerequisites: EnrE. 211, 351, and InfE. 320. 

353. Direct Energy Conversion. 4 hours. Novel methods of converting heat directly 
into electrical energy. Consideration of magnetohydrodynamics, thermoelectrics, 
thermionics, and fuel cells. Prerequisites: EnrE. 202 and 352. 

361. Atmospheric Motions. 4 hours. The equations of motion on a rotating earth and 
their application to dynamic meteorology. Various aspects of inertial geostropic, 
gradient, and thermal winds. Atmospheric turbulence and flow in the earth's 
boundary layer. Diffusion of heat, water vapor, and atmospheric pollutants. 
Prerequisites: EnrE. 214 and 217. 

391. Seminar. 1 to 4 hours. May be repeated for additional credit. Topics to be 
arranged. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Classical Thermodynamics. 4 hours. The postulatory approach to thermo- 
dynamics; entropy maximum postulate; conditions for equilibrium and stability. 
Property relations; reversibility; processes and cycles. Thermodynamics of elastic, 
magnetic, and electric systems. Prerequisite: Math. 220 or the equivalent. 



68 ENERGY ENGINEERING 



402. Thermodynamics of Multicomponent Systems. 4 hours. Application of the first, 
second, and third laws to chemical engineering systems. Concepts of chemical 
potential and fugacity. Availability and free energy. Chemical and phase equilibria 
with application to multicomponent and multiphase systems. Properties near the 
critical point. Law of corresponding states. Problems of a chemical engineering 
nature. Prerequisite: EnrE. 401 or the equivalent. 

404. Irreversible Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Irreversible systems approaching equi- 
librium. Method of irreversible thermodynamics; Onsager's fundamental theorem; 
statistical and kinetic bases of the theorem. Engineering applications: chemical 
and electrochemical reactions; thermal diffusion and diffusion thermophenomena; 
thermoelectric and thermomagnetic phenomena. Thermodynamic time. Prereq- 
uisite: EnrE. 401 or the equivalent. 

405. Advanced Statistical Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Electromagnetic radiation, 
quantum mechanics of solids, diatomic and polyatomic gases, statistical 
mechanics of interacting particles, real gases and liquids, chemical equilibrium and 
irreversible processes, emphasis on the engineering applications. Prerequisite: 
EnrE. 305. 

406. Transport Phenomena. 4 hours. Development of classical and statistical concepts 
of molecular diffusivity, conductivity, and other transport parameters. Kinetic 
theory of gases. Partition functions. Maxwell and Boltzmann distribution 
functions. Prerequisite: EnrE. 305 or the equivalent. 

407. Kinetic Theory of Nonuniform Gases I. 4 hours. Distribution function: 
Boltzmann equation and its solution, two-particle collisions, inverse collisions, 
collision cross-sections, intermolecular forces, derivation of transport coefficients 
of gases, and thermal diffusion. Prerequisites: EnrE. 307 and Math. 322. 

412. Potential Flow. 4 hours. Fluid kinematics, fundamental equations, exact and 
approximate solutions of the potential equation, conformal mapping, airfoil 
theory, and surface waves. Prerequisite: EnrE. 212 or the equivalent. 

414. Mechanics of Viscous Fluids. 4 hours. Internal and external flows. Boundary layer 
analysis. Similarity solutions, integral methods, and other techniques for treating 
laminar and turbulent flows. Prerequisite: EnrE. 310 or the equivalent. 

416. Compressible Fluid Mechanics. 4 hours. Conservation equations, equations of 
state, surface of discontinuity, one-dimensional and two-dimensional subsonic and 
supersonic flows, Prandtl-Mayer expansions and shock phenomena, theory of 
characteristics, and hodograph methods. Prerequisite: EnrE. 213 or the 
equivalent. 

418. Fundamentals of Turbulence. 4 hours. Mathematical descriptions of turbulence 
field; kinematics of homogeneous turbulence; correlation and spectrum tensors; 
dynamic behavior of isotropic turbulence; universal equilibrium theory; 
nonisotropic turbulence; transport processes in turbulent flows. Prerequisites: 
EnrE. 414 or 422 and Math. 323 or the equivalent. 



ENERGY ENGINEERING 69 



419. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics 1. 4 hours. Same as Materials Engineering 419. 
Kinematics and fundamental laws of mechanics. General constitutive equations; 
reduced constitutive equations. Homogeneous motions of simple bodies. Isotropic 
group, simple fluids, simple solids, simple subfluids. Examples. Prerequisite: EnrE. 
316. 

420. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics II. 4 hours. Same as Materials Engineering 420. 
Special classes of materials. Simple fluids, viscometric flows, the Weissenberg 
effect. Isotropic elastic materials, exact solutions. Wave propagation. Thermo- 
dynamics. Nonlinear viscoelastic materials, polar materials, and other materials. 
Prerequisite: EnrE. 419. 

421. Heat Conduction. 4 hours. Analysis of heat conduction in solids, including the use 
of Fourier series, integral transforms, similarity transformations, and approximate 
methods. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

422. Convective Heat Transfer. 4 hours. Conservation equations. Momentum, heat, and 
mass transfer in laminar and turbulent boundary layers for internal and external 
flows. Convective heat transfer at high velocities. Heat transfer with change of 
phase. Special topics in convective heat transfer. Prerequisite: EnrE. 310 or the 
equivalent. 

424. Thermal Radiation. 4 hours. Introduction to Planck's quantum theory. Black- 
body radiation; Wien's law; Stephan-Boltzmann's law. Basic concepts of total and 
spectral emissivity, absorptivity, reflectivity, and transmissivity. Kirchhoff's law. 
Radiation exchange between solid surfaces; gaseous radiation; radiation- 
convection interaction. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

426. Radiation Gas Dynamics. 4 hours. Basic laws and definitions of thermal radiation. 
Energy transfer in absorbing, emitting, and scattering media. Thin and thick 
approximate methods. Radiative equilibrium. Combined conduction and 
radiation. Combined convection and radiation. Prerequisites: EnrE. 414 or 422, 
and Math. 321 or the equivalent. 

431. Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering. 4 hours. Nonideal reactors; the effects 
of residence time distribution and mixedness. Heterogeneous noncatalytic 
reactions; gas-liquids, liquid- liquid, and solid- fluid systems. Heterogeneous 
catalytic reactions. Time dependent systems; catalyst deactivation. Prerequisite: 
EnrE. 386. 

432. Molecular Theory of Gas Dynamics. 4 hours. Kinetic theory distribution 
functions, Liouville theorem and Boltzmann equation. Moments of Boltzmann 
equation. Near-equilibrium perturbations; nonequilibrium analyses; rarefied gas 
flows; shock structure; nonequilibrium plasmas. Prerequisites: EnrE. 304, 310, 
and Math. 322 or the equivalent. 

434. Plasma Dynamics. 4 hours. Electromagnetic fields: Motions of charged particles; 
statistical description of plasmas; ionization phenomena; Landau damping; 
electromagnetic waves; instabilities. Prerequisite: EnrE. 432. 



70 ENERGY ENGINEERING 



436. Chemically Reacting Flows. 4 hours. Nonequilibrium states; chemical thermo- 
dynamics and kinetics. Multicomponent continuum equations for flow of 
nonequilibrium fluids. Inviscid nonequilibrium flows. Boundary layer flows with 
surface and gas-phase reactions. Frozen and equilibrium criteria. Waves in relaxing 
media. Prerequisites: EnrE. 414 or 422, and 416. 

438. Separation Processes. 4 hours. Advanced treatment of separation processes based 
on preferential migration. General theory. Binary and multicomponent distilla- 
tion. Absorption, adsorption, and extraction processes. Gas chromatography and 
liquid chromatography. Dialysis, and miscellaneous other separations. Prereq- 
uisite: EnrE. 304. 

440. Non-Newtonian Fluids. 4 hours. Constitutive equations for non-Newtonian fluids. 
Simple fluids. Viscoelasticity. Viscometric flows. Helical flow. Large elastic 
deformations, stress relaxation. Thermodynamics of viscoelastic fluids. Time- 
temperature superposition. Transport phenomena in non-Newtonian fluids. 
Experimental methods and results. Prerequisite: EnrE. 316. 

451. Kinetics of Gas Reactions. 4 hours. Basic concepts of reaction rate and 
mechanism. Collision theory, absolute rate theory, and theory of unimolecular 
decomposition. Dissociation, recombination, and chain reactions. Combustion, 
flames, and detonations. Catalysis. Prerequisites: EnrE. 304 and 305. 

484. Mathematical Techniques of Nuclear Reactor Theory I. 4 hours. Same as 
Mathematics 484. Introduction to nuclear physics and nuclear reactor physics; 
flux distributions, critical mass, slowing down kernels and their Fourier 
transforms, two-group steady state theory in the reflected reactor, buckling 
iteration method, matrix methods in boundary value and criticality problems in 
the one-dimensional multiregion reactor, series solutions of group diffusion 
equations in multiregion reactor and in two-dimensional fully reflected reactor, 
reactor criticality codes. Prerequisites: Math. 312, 323, 341 or 348, and 381 or 
the equivalents. 

485. Mathematical Techniques of Nuclear Reactor Theory II. 4 hours. Same as 
Mathematics 485. Variational methods in the criticality problem, theory of 
control rods in cylindrical reactor, introduction to reactor kinetics, perturbation 
theory and applications, adjoint flux distributions, inhour equation for multi- 
region multifuel reactors, xenon poisoning, and override problem. Prerequisite: 
EnrE. 484. 

486. Mathematical Techniques of Nuclear Reactor Theory III. 4 hours. Same as 
Mathematics 486. Cylindrical reactor with source, power-level determination 
problem, time-dependent flux distributions in multiregion reactor, one-group 
model, transient and stable flux distributions in multiregion reactor, two-group 
model, self-limiting power bursts, analysis of nonlinear feedback problems. 
Prerequisite: EnrE. 485. 

491. Specialized Problems. 4 to 12 hours. Specialized problems under the supervision 
of faculty. Prerequisite: Arrangement with the faculty. 



ENGLISH 71 



493. Current Topics of Energetics. 4 hours. The particular topics will vary from quarter 
to quarter depending on the interests of the students and the specialties of the 
instructor teaching the course at the time. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual research in 
specialized problems under the supervision of faculty. Prerequisite: Arrangement 
with the faculty. 

ENGLISH 

Professors: John C. Johnson, Head of the Department; Paul Carroll, John A. 
Conley, Dean B. Doner, Alexander Karanikas, Bernard R. Kogan, Jay A. 
Levine, Louis A. Marder, Ralph J. Mills, John F. Nims, Robert B. Ogle, 
Andrew Schiller, John B. Shipley, James B. Stronks, Samuel A. Weiss, Martin 
L. Wine, Elizabeth V. Wright 

Associate Professors: Beverly Fields, Gloria G. Fromm, Lester S. Golub, 
Guinevere L. Griest, Michael Lieb, Adam Makkai, Valerie B. Makkai, Patricia 
McFate, A. LaVonne Ruoff, Jaroslav Schejbal (Visiting), Mary Thale, Maurita 
Willett 

Assistant Professors: Preston M. Browning, Melvin H. Buxbaum, Archibald J. 
Byrne, Nancy R. Cirillo, Edith Gold, Hymen H. Hart, Dale S. Herron, Howard 
H. Kerr, David S. Lenfest, Vincent Louthan, Irving M. Miller, Sondra 
Rosenberg, Gerald C. Sorensen 



Degree Programs 

The Department of English offers courses of study leading to the Master 
of Arts in English, with specializations in literature (both English and 
American) and in creative writing and to the Master of Arts in Linguistics. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must hold a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science from an 
accredited college or university and an overall grade-point average of at least 
B (4.000 on a 5.000 scale) for the last 90 quarter (60 semester) hours of 
undergraduate study. 

A student who applies for the creative writing or the literature program 
must present the equivalent of 36 quarter hours of English and American 
literature, of which 28 hours must be in English (including a course in 
Shakespeare) and 8 in American literature, with any additional literature 
courses in either. These requirements do not apply to those seeking admission 
to the linguistics program. Sophomore-level surveys of English or American 



72 ENGLISH 



literature will not be counted toward the 36 hours. If a student whose 
undergraduate course work is deficient earns a high score on the Graduate 
Record Examination, he may be admitted after a favorable review by the 
department graduate committee. In some cases the committee may set 
prerequisites to be made up, without graduate credit, in the student's first 
quarter(s) at Chicago Circle. The passing grade for a deficiency course is B. 

In exceptional circumstances, the committee may accept applicants with 
an average between 3.750 and 4.000. They may be admitted as regular 
students if their Graduate Record Examination scores and other factors 
warrant. Otherwise, these students and any others with an average between 
3.500 and 3.750 who seem to warrant special consideration may be admitted 
on probation. However, the number of probationary admissions is limited. 

All probationary students and all those seeking to enter any of the 
department programs from unassigned status in the Graduate College must 
present GRE scores at least at the 66th percentile rank in both the general 
aptitude and the advanced literature tests. 

Applicants for admission to any of the graduate programs in the 
Department of English must submit the following, unless otherwise 
exempted: 

An application form (accompanied by the $15 nonrefundable application 

fee). 
A transcript of undergraduate (and any graduate) course work. 
Two letters of recommendation, preferably from professors who are 

familiar with the applicant's recent work. 
A statement of about 250 words presenting the applicant's reasons for 
wishing to take graduate work in English and the relationship of his 
work to his professional and other goals (foreign applicants see 
below). 
Graduate Record Examination scores for both the general aptitude and 
the advanced literature tests. A student who applies for admission to 
the linguistics program need take only the aptitude tests, though it is 
recommended that he submit the scores for his own special field. 
Evidence of a reading knowledge of a foreign language: any of the major 
modern European or the classical languages (Greek or Latin). Inquire 
about the acceptability of other languages. This requirement may be 
satisfied by either of the following: (1) by presenting a grade of A or 
B in an upper-division (junior-senior) foreign-language literature 
course or (2) by presenting a score on the ETS Graduate School 
Foreign Language Test that is at least at the 50th percentile rank. If 
an otherwise qualified applicant does not present evidence of 
foreign-language competence, he will be admitted on limited status 
until he has satisfied the requirement by either of the following: (1) 
by passing an upper-division literature course (200- or 300-level) in a 
classical language or in a major modern European language (or others 
by petition) with a grade of A or B, or (2) by passing a reading 



ENGLISH 73 

examination. A student must complete this requirement within the 
first two quarters of full-time study or before he has earned 24 
quarter hours of credit. 

An applicant for admission to the creative writing program, in addition to 
the foregoing, must submit a sample of his writing (at least five poems, a 
story, a chapter from a novel, or comparable work) to the staff of the 
Program for Writers. 

A foreign applicant should submit GRE scores if it is possible for him to 
take the examinations. In any event, in place of the 250-word statement, he is 
required to submit a 4 to 5 page summary (preferably typed double space) of 
his educational experience, with stress on his work in English and American 
literature and language. The applicant should conclude this summary with his 
reasons for wanting to do graduate work in the United States. 



Degree Requirements 

M.A. in English 
Specialization in Literature 

Hours: 48 quarter hours of course work are required, including English 
400, Introduction to Bibliography and Research. At least 36 of the 48 hours 
must be in English; the remaining 12 hours may be in courses in other 
departments or disciplines approved by the student's adviser. 

A thesis is not required. Each student will submit one qualifying paper, of 
not less than 40 pages, for the approval of the Graduate Committee of the 
department. The qualifying paper may be an enlarged version of a paper 
written for a 300- or 400-level course, may have originated in independent 
research, or may have arisen independently of any course. The student must 
enroll in English 497, Independent Research, 4 hours, to write an acceptable 
qualifying paper. 

The student must satisfy a language requirement as stated in the 
admission requirements. 

All candidates are required to pass a master's examination given in the 
spring, summer, and fall. Students may take English 497 for 4 quarter hours 
to prepare for this examination. If a student fails the examination, he may be 
allowed to repeat it once. 



Specialization in Creative Writing 

Hours: 48 hours of course work are required, distributed as follows: at 
least 16 hours of 300- or 400-level literature courses (exclusive of the 
300-level writing courses); English 400, Introduction to Bibliography and 



74 ENGLISH 



Research, or English 472, Criticism Workshop; no more than 16 hours in 
writing workshops. The remaining 12 hours may be taken in tutorials (English 
497) or in graduate-level literature courses (exclusive of 300-level writing 
courses) in English or in other departments, as approved by the adviser. 

Thesis: Each student must present a thesis consisting of a publishable 
volume of his work, such as a volume of poems, a novel, a collection of 
stories, a play, etc. Groups of smaller works (such as a chapbook of poems or 
a group of two or three critical essays) may also be submitted. As these works 
are expected to grow out of the writing workshops, credit for English 499 
will not be given. 

A student must satisfy a language requirement, as stated in the admission 
requirements. Successful completion of English 473, Workshop in Trans- 
lation, will satisfy this requirement. 

The candidate must pass a master's examination. He may take English 
497 for 4 quarter hours to prepare for this examination only at the discretion 
of the chairman of the Program for Writers. 



M.A. in Linguistics 

Hours: 48 quarter hours of course work are required, including 
Linguistics 315, Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics, and English 400, 
Introduction to Bibliography and Research (in a section for linguistics 
students). If the student has not had a course in the history of the English 
language, he may be required to take English 301. 

Thesis: All students are required to submit a thesis. 

All students must satisfy a language requirement, as stated in the 
admission requirements. However, a student in linguistics is not limited to 
European languages. 

All candidates must pass a comprehensive examination. The student may 
take English 497 for 4 quarter hours to prepare for this examination only at 
the discretion of the chairman of the linguistics section. 

A student may select either of two programs in linguistics: 

The Applied Linguistics Program is intended primarily for teachers of 
English and other languages on the secondary level. Therefore, their course 
work is designed to provide a general background in linguistics. The emphasis 
is also to some extent literary. 



ENGLISH 75 



The Theoretical Linguistics Program aims to establish a firm groundwork 
for persons who intend to become professional linguists. Therefore, the 
emphasis is scientific rather than literary or pedagogical. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. History of the English Language. 4 hours. English in its relationship to other 
languages; historical account of its development. Prerequisite: 12 hours in English. 

302. Tennyson and Browning. 4 hours. Close study of the lyric poetry and the 
dramatic monologues of Tennyson and Browning; briefer examination of 
Tennyson's Arthurian idylls and of the plays of both. 

303. Carlyle and Mill. 4 hours. Major works. 

304. George Eliot and Trollope. 4 hours. Close study of novels by Eliot and Trollope; 
their relationship to both the Victorian era and the development of the novel. 
Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours in English. 

305. Newman and Arnold. 4 hours. The prose of one early and one mid-Victorian 
writer: their contributions to nineteenth-century religious and educational 
theories. Arnold's literary and social criticism. The rhetoric of both; brief 
reference to the poems and letters of each that most closely parallel ideas and 
moods in their prose. 

306. Dickens and Thackeray. 4 hours. Close study of the major writings of the two 
representative Victorian novelists. 

307. Yeats and Eliot. 4 hours. Detailed study of the two most influential English poets 
of the twentieth century. Study of specific texts; some emphasis on the 
intellectual and spiritual attitudes represented by each. 

308. Conrad and Lawrence. 4 hours. Studies in the short fiction and novels of two 
important modern British writers; examination of their contrasting views of the 
purpose of fiction. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours in English. 

310. American Puritanism. 4 hours. Intensive study of the writings of the American 
Puritans from William Bradford to Jonathan Edwards. Major aspects of Puritan 
life and thought. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours in English. 

311. Chaucer. 4 hours. Readings in the major works. 

312. Introduction to Old English. 4 hours. Elements of Old English grammar and the 
reading of graded prose selections. Prerequisite: 12 hours in English. 

313. Old English Poetry and Prose. 4 hours. Heroic, elegiac, and religious poetry of 
England to 1200, exclusive of Beowulf; representative prose. Prerequisite: Engl. 
312. 



76 ENGLISH 

314. Beowulf. 4 hours. Detailed explication of the poem. Prerequisite: Engl. 313. 

316. American Drama. 4 hours. Major dramatic writings in American literature. 

317. The Writing of Poetry. 4 hours. Limited to 15 students. May be repeated for a 
total of 1 2 hours. The practice of the writing of poetry, aided by intensive study 
of examples. Prerequisite: 12 hours of English literature. 

318. The Aesthetic Movement from 1850 to 1900. 4 hours. Major figures and ideas 
behind the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the aesthetic movement in the last 
half of the nineteenth century in England. 

319. Introduction to Middle English. 4 hours. A linguistic examination of Middle 
English and its dialects. 

321. Medieval Literature I. 4 hours. Selected works in Middle English and continental 
medieval writings in English translation. Prerequisite: A minimum of 1 2 hours in 
English. 

322. Medieval Literature II. 4 hours. Continues English 321. Prerequisite: A minimum 
of 1 2 hours in English. 

323. Wordsworth and Coleridge. 4 hours. Close examination of the major works, both 
poetry and prose. Prerequisite: A minumum of 12 hours in English, including 
Engl. 243 and 244. 

324. Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 4 hours. The major figures of the second generation of 
Romantics. 

325. The Writing of Fiction. 4 hours. Limited to 15 students. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 1 2 hours. The practice of the writing of fiction, aided by intensive 
study of examples. Prerequisite: 8 hours in English literature. 

331. Important Minor Plays and Poems of Shakespeare. 4 hours. Plays, poems, and 
sonnets. Prerequisite: Engl. 231 or 232. 

332. The Poetry of Edmund Spenser. 4 hours. Introduction to the Faerie Queen and 
The Shepheardes Calendar; some attention to the minor verse and its place in the 
English Renaissance. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours in English. 

334. Literary Criticism, Theory, and Practice. 4 hours. Survey of literary criticism, 
focusing on major critics from Plato to Matthew Arnold. 

335. Modern Literary Criticism. 4 hours. Survey from Matthew Arnold to the present. 
Prerequisite: Engl. 334. 

337. Exercises in Literary Criticism: Poetry. 4 hours. Advanced course in practical 
criticism of poetry in English. Prerequisite: Engl. 335 or the equivalent. 

338. Tragedy. 4 hours. A formal and theoretic inquiry into tragedy: its origins, 
evolution, and significance, based on selected masterworks of various periods. 



Supplement to Graduate Study 

CHICAGO circle bulletin Errata 

VoL 6 No. 4 August 15, 1971 p gg 



ENERGY ENGINEERING 



The department offers a program leading to the degree of Master of 
Science in Energy Engineering and, jointly with the Department of Materials 
Engineering, a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 
Engineering (Solids and Fluids). 

These programs are broadly based to accommodate students in aerospace, 
chemical, mechanical, power engineering, and related fields. The primary 
areas upon which these fields are based are continuum and molecular fluid 
mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and macroscopic and microscopic 
thermodynamics. 

After admission to the Graduate College, a temporary adviser is assigned 
to the student. The student, however, is required to choose a permanent 
adviser during the first quarter. As soon as the permanent adviser has been 
selected, the student should outline the complete program proposed for the 
degree (M.S. or Ph.D.) with the help of his adviser and the graduate 
committee of the department. 

The Ph.D. program presently includes the following broad areas of 
specialization: continuum mechanics, gas dynamics, heat transfer, metallurgy, 
plasma dynamics, soil engineering, and structures. Of these, the Department 
of Energy Engineering offers study in the fields of gas dynamics, heat 
transfer, and plasma dynamics. Students are permitted and encouraged to 
follow interdisciplinary programs which may include more than one area of 
specialty and require taking courses in more than one department. 



Admission Requirements 

Graduates from recognized engineering colleges will be admitted if they 
have maintained a grade-point average of B (4.00 out of 5.00) or better in 
undergraduate study. Those with lower averages may be admitted upon 
recommendation of the department, provided they satisfy the minimum 
requirements of the Graduate College. Practicing engineers wishing to return 
to school for further graduate instruction may be admitted on a tentative 
basis if their professional experience makes it appear likely that they will be 
able to follow the program successfully. This tentative admission will become 
permanent after the completion of at least 16 quarter hours with an average 
of 4.00 or better. 



Supplement to Graduate Study 

CHICAGO circle bulletin Errata 

Vol. 6 No: 4 August 15, 1971 P 1 S 1 

PHYSICS 



Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the requirements of the Graduate College, 
applicants must have 30 quarter hours (20 semester hours) of courses in 
physics beyond the level of general physics, including Physics 301, 302, 321, 
and 341, or their equivalents, and a grade-point average of at least 3^75 for 
the last 90 quarter hours of undergraduate work. Applicants with grade-point 
averages below 3.75 but above 3.50 may be admitted under special 
circumstances. Applicants who have majored in fields other than physics and 
who meet the other academic requirements may be considered for admission, 
but they will be required to take the necessary undergraduate courses without 
credit in order to prepare themselves for successful participation in graduate 
work. 



Supplement to Graduate Study 

Chicago circle bulletin Errata 

Vol. 6 No. 4 August 15, 1971 p joy 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



The department offers courses leading to the degree of Master of Arts. 
Students may specialize in American government or public administration. A 
thesis is optional. The non-thesis option requires 48 hours of course work; the 
thesis option requires 40 hours of course work and 8 hours of thesis research. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a degree from an accredited institution of higher 
learning and a B average for the last two years of undergraduate work. Those 
with grade-point averages below 4.00 but above 3.75 will be considered in 
exceptional cases. 



An applicant generally must present a Bachelor of Arts degree with a 
major in political science or with a minimum of 20 quarter hours in political 
science; or he may petition to be admitted by the department. 

Applications for entrance with advanced graduate standing will be 
considered on the basis of individual preparation and merit. 

All applicants are required to take the Aptitude Test and the Advanced 
Political Science Test of the Graduate Record Examination. Information 
about this examination can be obtained from the head of the Department of 
Political Science. Performance on this examination, undergraduate academic 
record, and letters of recommendation from former teachers are the three 
principal kinds of evidence considered in making decisions about admission 
and in the awarding of assistantships. It is particularly advantageous, 
therefore, for the prospective applicant to take this examination in the fall of 
his senior year. 



ENGLISH 77 



339. Comedy. 4 hours. History and theory of comic drama. 

340. English and American Satire. 4 hours. Selected writings. Prerequisite: A minimum 
of 1 2 hours in English. 

341. Dryden. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Poems, 
plays, and literary criticism; emphasis on the interaction of these genres in 
Dryden's development. 

342. The Poetry of Milton. 4 hours. Origins, forms, and artistic and ethical values; 
Milton's place in English literary history. Prerequisite : A minimum of 1 2 hours in 
English. 

343. Tudor Drama. 4 hours. The rise of English drama from shortly after the medieval 
period to the building of permanent theaters in London and the death of 
Elizabeth; emphasis on the works of Christopher Marlowe. Prerequisite: A 
minimum of 12 hours in English. 

344. Stuart Drama. 4 hours. English drama from the accession of James I to the closing 
of the theaters in 1642 by the Puritan "long" Parliament; emphasis on the works 
of Ben Jonson. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours in English. 

345. The Metaphysical Poets. 4 hours. The poetry of Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, 
Crashaw. Special emphasis on Donne. 

347. Restoration Drama. 4 hours. Major dramatic works after the reopening of the 
public theaters in 1660; development from aristocratic Baroque tragedy and 
comedy to the beginnings of bourgeois sentimental drama. Dryden, Etherege, 
Wycherley, Congreve, Vanbrugh, Farquhar, Otway, Cibber, and others. 

348. Swift. 4 hours. Detailed study of the works of Jonathan Swift in the light of the 
intellectual and aesthetic currents of the period. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 
hours in English. 

349. Johnson and Boswell. 4 hours. Principal writings. 

350. American Transcendentalists. 4 hours. The Transcendent alist circle in and about 
Concord from 1830 to 1860: Emerson and Thoreau, Alcott, Brownson, Fuller, 
Ripley, Parker, Charming, and others. Prerequisite: Engl. 255 or Hist. 356 or 357. 

351. English Prose of the Eighteenth Century. 4 hours. A survey; emphasis on the 
development of prose styles and their relation to modes of thought. Prerequisite: 
A minimum of 12 hours in English. 

352. Pope. 4 hours. Detailed study of the works of Alexander Pope in the light of the 
intellectual and aesthetic currents of the period. 

353. Eighteenth Century Drama. 4 hours. Major dramatic works and trends. Steele, 
Addison, Rowe, Gay, Lillo, Garrick, Cumberland, Goldsmith, Sheridan, and 
others are studied. 



78 ENGLISH 



355. American Fiction from 1800 to 1860. 4 hours. Intensive study of the background 
and development of traditions and themes. 

357. Studies in the Short Story. 4 hours. The short story as a literary form; close 
readings of selected short stories. 

365. Readings in the Lyric II: English. 4 hours. Selected lyrics from the thirteenth 
through the nineteenth centuries. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours in 
English. 

370. Studies in Black Literature. 4 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours. 
A theme, genre, movement, or author in black literature; emphasis on American 
literature. Prerequisite: Senior standing or 12 hours in English. Engl. 170 is 
recommended. 

375. Henry James and the Technique of Fiction. 4 hours. Development of Henry 
James as a novelist. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours in English. 

376. W.D. Howells: Realism in Fiction and Criticism. 4 hours. The career of William 
Dean Howells as a journalist, novelist, editor, and critic; his influence on the 
development of realism in late nineteenth and early twentieth century American 
literature. 

377. Naturalism in the American Novel: Dreiser, Crane, Norris, Lewis, and Others. 4 
hours. The development of the naturalistic novel; special emphasis on Dreiser and 
his followers. 

380. The Rise of Realism. 4 hours. Realism in American fiction from 1850 to 1900; 
Old Southwest humor and local color; Twain, Howells, Crane, the early 
naturalists, and others. Prerequisite: Engl. 256. 

382. The Plays of Bernard Shaw. 4 hours. A critical, social, and philosophical inquiry. 

383. Teaching English as a Second Language. 4 hours. Same as Education 383 and 
Linguistics 383. The methodology of teaching English to residents of the United 
States who do not speak the language, especially Spanish-Americans. A brief 
description of the structure of American English, methods of teaching each aspect 
of its structure, various teaching devices and aids, special problems that may arise, 
and an examination of various texts. Prerequisite: Ling. 315. 

385. Faulkner and Hemingway. 4 hours. Studies in the short stories and novels of the 
two writers; examination of their literary theories. 

386. Hawthorne and Melville. 4 hours. Two major writers of the nineteenth century; 
detailed analysis of one major novel of each. Prerequisite: Engl. 255. 

388. Southern Fiction. 4 hours. Major works. 

389. Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. 4 hours. The poetry and major prose of 
Whitman; the poems of Emily Dickinson. Prerequisite: 12 hours in English. 



ENGLISH 79 



399. Independent Study. 1 to 4 hours. Open only to English majors and graduate 
students in English. Admission to this course is only on advice of and initiated by 
the English Department. Individual studies under the direction of an assigned 
faculty member. Nature of the work is determined by the tutor on the basis of 
the student's needs and interests. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

400. Introduction to Bibliography and Research. 4 hours. Required of graduate 
students in English. Detailed study of bibliographic tools and examination of 
various kinds of research papers. 

405. Seminar on Old English. 4 hours. A topic in Old English; emphasis on literature or 
philology. Content varies. Prerequisite: Engl. 314 or the equivalent. 

406. Introduction to Old Norse. 4 hours. Same as German 436. The grammar of Old 
Norse and the reading of selected prose and poetry. Prerequisite: A reading 
knowledge of some other older Germanic dialect, such as Old English, Old Saxon, 
or Gothic. 

415. Seminar on Middle English Literature. 6 hours. Individual conferences on assigned 
papers are required. Middle English and middle Scots literature, exclusive of 
Chaucer. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in medieval English literature. 

416. Seminar on Chaucer. 6 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are 
required. Chaucer's works. Content varies. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in 
medieval English literature. 

420. Seminar on Renaissance Literature. 6 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 
12 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. One author, 
topic, movement, or genre. Content varies. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in 
Renaissance literature. 

421. Seminar on Shakespeare. 6 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours. 
Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Shakespeare's works. 
Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in Shakespeare. 

422. Seminar on Milton. 6 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are 
required. Milton's works. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in Renaissance 
literature. 

425. Seminar on Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature. 6 hours. May be 

repeated for a maximum of 12 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers 
are required. One author, topic, movement, or genre. Content varies. Prerequisite: 
A minimum of 4 hours in Restoration and eighteenth century literature. 

430. Seminar on Romantic Literature. 6 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 
hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. One author, topic, 



80 ENGLISH 



or movement. Content varies. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in Romantic 
literature. 

435. Seminar on Victorian Literature. 6 hours. Individual conferences on assigned 
papers are required. One author, topic, movement, or genre. Prerequisite: A 
minimum of 4 hours in Victorian literature. 

440. Seminar on Modern British Literature. 6 hours. May be repeated for a maximum 
of 12 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. One author, 
topic, movement, or genre. Content varies. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in 
modern British literature. 

445. Seminar on American Literature. 6 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 
hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. One author, topic, 
or movement. Content varies. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in American 
literature. 

447. Seminar on Black Literature. 6 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 
hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. One author, topic, 
movement, or genre. Content varies. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours in black 
literature or American literature. 

455. Teaching College English. 4 hours. Methods, materials, and practice in teaching 
college composition. 

470. Program for Writers: Poetry Workshop. 4 hours. May be repeated for a maximum 
of 12 hours. Emphasis on discussion of poems written by the students. 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Program for Writers. 

471. Program for Writers: Fiction Workshop. 4 hours. May be repeated for a maximum 
of 12 hours. Emphasis on discussion of fiction written by the students. 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Program for Writers. 

472. Program for Writers: Criticism Workshop. 4 hours. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 12 hours. Emphasis on discussion of criticism written by the 
students. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program for Writers. 

473. Program for Writers: Translation Workshop. 4 hours. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 12 hours. Emphasis on discussion of translation by the students. 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Program for Writers. 

474. Program for Writers: Nonfiction Workshop. 4 hours. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 12 hours. Emphasis on discussion of nonfiction written by the 
students. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program for Writers. 

475. Program for Writers: Experimental Writing Workshop. 4 hours. May be repeated 
for a maximum of 12 hours. Emphasis on discussion of experimental writing by 
the students. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program for Writers. 

480. Seminar on Genres of Literature. 6 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 1 2 
hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. A single genre, such 
as poetry, fiction, nonfiction, drama, or literary criticism. 



GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 81 



481. Seminar on Literature and Related Fields. 6 hours. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 12 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. 
The relationship between literature and such fields as the fine arts, philosophy, 
psychology, religion, science, and sociology. Prerequisite: A minimum of 4 hours 
in the area of the literature to be studied. 

497. Research in English. 2 to 8 hours. May be repeated for a total of 16 hours. 
Students are assigned to this course at the discretion of the department. 
Independent research in English and American literature, linguistics, and creative 
writing. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Students are assigned 
to this course at the discretion of the department. For students involved in thesis 
research and writing for advanced degrees. 



GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Professors: Werner H. Baur, Head of the Department; Richard B. McCammon 

Associate Professors: Robert E. DeMar, Helen M. McCammon (Visiting), 
Kelvin S. Rodolfo, Walter Sadlick 

Assistant Professors: David W. Baker, Warren C. Forbes, Jr., Bruce G. 
Gladfelter, Aijaz A. Khan, August F. Koster van Groos, Zubair Saleem, 
Norman D. Smith 

Work leading to the Master of Science is offered in these areas: 
crystallography, mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry; paleontology; 
oceanography, sedimentology, and sedimentary geochemistry. 



Admission Requirements 

Admission generally requires a minimum grade-point average of 4.000. 
However, the department will rely strongly on recommendations from the 
applicant's undergraduate professors and on the grade-point average attained 
in the last two years of college. Geology students with a strong background in 
mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology will receive preference, 
although students who have degrees in other sciences may be admitted. 
Serious deficiencies in undergraduate training in geology or other sciences will 
have to be corrected during the graduate program. The program will be 
selected by the student and his adviser(s) to correspond with his area of 
specialization. Students are requested to take the Graduate Record 
Examination. 



82 GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



Degree Requirements 

Hours: 48 quarter hours, 24 of which must be in the area of 
concentration. The area of concentration may, as in evolutionary paleon- 
tology, for example, span several academic disciplines. A minimum of 16 
quarter hours must be taken in 400-level courses; 8 of these should be in the 
area of concentration. 

Thesis: The student must complete a written report or a thesis involving 8 
quarter hours of work on an independent study or research project selected 
with the approval of bis faculty supervisor. The department may request the 
student to take a comprehensive examination in his area of specialization and 
independent study. The independent study report or thesis will be evaluated 
by a department committee that will include one member selected from 
outside the faculty of Chicago Circle. 

Candidates must demonstrate competence in reading the scientific 
literature of at least one foreign language. French, German, and Russian are 
the preferred languages. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

310. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. 4 hours. Discussion of petrogenesis; 
application of thermodynamic principles to the crystallization of rocks. Prereq- 
uisites: Chem. 114 and GeolS. 210. 

315. Sedimentology. 4 hours. Composition, texture, and structures of sediments and 
sedimentary rocks. Environmental factors that control sediment genesis. Theory 
and techniques of modern sedimentology. Prerequisites: Chem. 114, GeolS. 215, 
and credit or registration in Math. 131. 

316. Invertebrate Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 316. Phylogeny, 
morphology, and ecology of the fossil invertebrates. Prerequisites: GeolS. 218 and 
consent of the instructor. 

318. Vertebrate Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 318. Phylogeny, 
morphology, and ecology of the fossil vertebrates. Prerequisites: BioS. 281 and 
consent of the instructor. 

319. Paleobotany. 5 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 319. Structure, phylogeny, and 
stratigraphic distribution of representative fossil plants. Lecture, laboratory, ahd 
field trips. Prerequisite: One year of biological sciences. 

320. Analysis of Geologic Structures. 4 hours. Elementary stress and strain relations 
for earth materials. Nature and origin of fold*- and faults. Structural petrology. 
Deformation of the earth's crust. Prerequisites: Math. 130 and credit or 
registration in Phys. 101 or 111. 



GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 83 



330. Environmental Geology. 4 hours. Geological aspects of man's environment; 
emphasis on the earth's processes, resources, and physical properties of rocks and 
soils insofar as they are important to, or in some way affect, human activities. 
Prerequisites: Math. 132 and one year of physical sciences. 

335. Geochemistry. 4 hours. Principles of the distribution of the elements in the 
earth's crust. Element partitioning between coexisting minerals; origin of the 
elements. Introduction to thermodynamic consideration of mineral equilibria. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 114. 

345. Advanced Crystallography. 4 hours. Crystalline properties of minerals. Theory 
and practice of determining the crystalline structure of minerals. Prerequisite: 
GeolS. 300. 

350. Hydrogeology. 4 hours. The occurrence, storage, movement, and quality of water 
in rocks of the earth's crust. Prerequisites: GeolS. 103 and 220; credit or 
concurrent registration in Math. 133. 

360. Introductory Geophysics. 4 hours. The shape and figure of the earth, gravity, 
seismology, and magnetism. Thermodynamics of the earth; atmospheric and 
planetary geophysics. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



Statistical Methods in Geology. 4 hours. Introductory course. Sampling from 
geological populations, statistical inference, and hypothesis testing; statistics of 
orientation data; trend surface methods; multivariate correlation techniques; time 
series analysis. Prerequisite: Math. 370. 

Engineering Geology. 4 hours. Applications of geology to major engineering 
problems and operations. Prerequisites: GeolS. 150, 206, Math. 132, and Phys. 
114. 

Earth Science for Teachers. 9 hours. Survey of the earth sciences; particular 
attention to the Earth Science Curriculum Project (ESCP) materials. Emphasis on 
the interdisciplinary nature of and investigative approach toward earth science. 
Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in science or mathematics, enrollment in NSF 
In-Service Institute for Secondary School Teachers and consent of the instructor. 

Geophysical Exploration. 4 hours. Introduction to methods of geophysical 
exploration. Interpretation of seismic data, gravity and magnetic anomalies, and 
electrical and electromagnetic surveys. Laboratory includes field investigations. 
Prerequisites: Math. 133 and GeolS. 360. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

413. Problems in Evolutionary Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 413. 
Seminar on current problems. Discussion of evidence and mechanisms of change, 
such as rates of evolution, population structure, and extinction as shown by the 
vertebrate fossil record. Prerequisites: GeolS. 218 and BioS. 305. Biological 
Sciences 345 is recommended. 



84 GERMAN 



420. Advanced Vertebrate Paleontology. 4 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 420. 
Given as three different courses. May be repeated twice for credit. Advanced 
treatment of the functional morphology, paleoecology, and phylogeny of the 
various vertebrate groups: fishes, amphibians and reptiles, and mammals. 
Prerequisite: BioS. 282 and GeolS. 318. 

430. Advanced Mineralogy. 4 hours. May be repeated if the same topic is not covered 
twice. Various topics in one of the following categories: structural mineralogy, 
X-ray crystallography, optical properties of minerals, and crystal chemistry and 
mineral synthesis. Lectures, seminars, and laboratory. Prerequisites: GeolS. 206 
and consent of the instructor. 

432. Advanced Geochemistry. 4 hours. May be repeated if the same category is not 
covered twice. Advanced topics in one of the following categories: isotope 
geochemistry and geochronology, distribution of elements in the earth's crust, 
mineral systems with and without volatile components, and low-temperature 
mineral systems. Lectures, seminar, and laboratory. Prerequisites: GeolS. 335 and 
consent of the instructor. 

440. Ground-Water Seminar. 4 hours. Selected topics in ground-water hydrology. 
Prerequisites: GeolS. 350 and credit or concurrent registration in Math. 220. 

460. Marine Geology. 4 hours. Origin and nature of marine sediments, tectonics and 
geomorphology of the ocean floor, including methods of mapping and measuring 
submarine topography. Prerequisites: GeolS. 220 and 340. 

495. Advanced Studies in Geology. 2 to 8 hours. May be repeated twice. Independent 
study or research, under a faculty supervisor, culminating in a written report. 
Work may be taken in the following fields: stratigraphy, sedimentation, 
paleontology and paleoecology, vertebrate paleontology, mineralogy and 
petrology, crystallography, geochemistry, engineering geology, oceanography. 
Prerequisites: Consent of the head of the department and the faculty member 
who will act as study supervisor. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual work under 
the supervision of faculty members in their respective fields. Prerequisites: 
Consent of the thesis supervisor and the head of the department. 



GERMAN 

Professors: Robert R. Heitner, Head of the Department; Lee B. Jennings, 
Robert Kauf, Daniel C. McCluney, Jr., Leroy R. Shaw, Elizabeth Teichmann, 
Hazel C. Var daman 

Associate Professors: Arnold J. Hartoch, Karl F. Otto, Jr., Ernest S. Willner 

Assistant Professors: Thomas A. Buesch, Heinz C. Christiansen, Else 
Huenert-Hofmann, Brian O. Murdoch, Marilyn J. Torbruegge 



GERMAN 85 



Work leading to the Master of Arts is offered in two areas of 
specialization: German literature and German philology and linguistics. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a bachelor's degree with a major in German from an 
accredited institution or the equivalent from a foreign university. Those 
whose undergraduate preparation in German is deemed inadequate may be 
admitted at the discretion of the department but will be required to take 
supplementary course work on the undergraduate level. Applicants are 
expected to have a grade-point average of 4.000 in their undergraduate work 
in German; those with averages between 3.500 and 4.000 may be considered. 

Entering students must have the ability to read literary and critical 
German with speed and accuracy and to follow class lectures in German. 
They should also have an elementary acquaintance with German linguistics 
and some knowledge of the main outlines of German literature from 1750 to 
the present. 



Degree Requirements 

Program A (A thesis is not required) 

1. A minimum of 48 hours of course work, including at least 36 hours in the 
major field, 18 of which must be in 400-level courses. 

2. At least one graduate seminar in German. 

3. A one-hour oral examination and a three-hour written comprehensive 
examination. 

Program B (A thesis is required) 

1. A minimum of 36 quarter hours of course work, including at least 24 
hours in the major, 18 of which must be in 400-level courses. 

2. At least one graduate seminar in German. 

3. A master's thesis. 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

320. Writing and Speaking German V. 4 hours. Prerequisite: Ger. 204 or the equivalent. 

321. Writingand Speaking German VI. 4 hours. Prerequisite: Ger. 320 or the equivalent. 

370. The German Novelle. 4 hours. Reading and interpretation of representative 
Novellen of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisites: Ger. 221 and 
two additional German literature courses. 

372. German Drama. 4 hours. Development from the Enlightenment to the present. 
Prerequisites: Ger. 221 and two additional German literature courses. 



86 GERMAN 



374. Poetry from the Seventeenth Century to the Present. 4 hours. Prerequisites: Ger. 
221 and two additional German literature courses. 

380. Goethe's Faust. 4 hours. Intensive study of Parts I and II. Prerequisites: Ger. 221 
and two additional German literature courses. 

382. German Literature to 1750. 4 hours. Prerequisites: Ger. 221 and two additional 
German literature courses. 

385. Germanic Linguistics. 4 hours. Linguistic geography, Sprachschichten, and 
principles of structural linguistics. Prerequisite: Ger. 203 or the equivalent. 

390. Topics in German Literature. 4 hours. May be taken more than once for credit. 
Reading and discussion of the work of one prominent German author or of a 
group of related authors. Subject varies and is chosen by the instructor. Prereq- 
uisites: Ger. 290, 292, and 294. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

404. Theories of German Phonetics and Phonology. 4 hours. Introduction to 
phonological and phonetical analysis of the German language. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

405. History of the German Language. 4 hours. Structural and lexical development. 

407. Teaching Methods for Graduate Assistants. 1 hour. May be repeated twice for 
credit. Prerequisite: Appointment as a teaching assistant in German. 

408. Bibliography and Research Methods. 4 hours. 
410. Middle High German. 4 hours. 

420. Medieval Literature. 4 hours. German literature from 1100 to 1400. Prerequisites: 
Ger. 382 and 410 or the equivalents. 

421. Renaissance and Reformation Literature. 4 hours. Prerequisite: Ger. 382 or the 
equivalent. 

422. Baroque Literature. 4 hours. Prerequisite: Ger. 382 or the equivalent. 

423. Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang Literature. 4 hours. 

425. Goethe and Schiller— The Weimar Period. 4 hours. 

426. Romanticism. 4 hours. Literature, theories, and philosophy of eighteenth and 
nineteenth century German Romanticism. 

427. Poetic Realism. 4 hours. German literature between Romanticism and Naturalism. 






GERMAN 87 



428. Modern German Literature from 1890 to 1930. 4 hours. 

429. Contemporary Literature. 4 hours. German drama, lyric and narrative prose from 
1930 to the present. 

432. Old High German. 4 hours. Introduction to sounds, morphology, and syntax. 
Reading of Old High German literary texts. Prerequisite: Ger. 405. 

433. Old Saxon. 4 hours. Introduction to sounds, morphology, and syntax. Reading of 
Old Saxon literary texts. Comparison of Old Saxon, Old English, and Old High 
German. Prerequisite: Ger. 405. 

434. Gothic. 4 hours. Introduction to sounds, morphology, and syntax. Reading of 
Gothic literary texts. Prerequisite: Ger. 405. 

436. Introduction to Old Norse. 4 hours. Same as English 406. The grammar of Old 
Norse and the reading of selected prose and poetry. Prerequisite: A reading 
knowledge of some other older Germanic dialect such as Old English, Old Saxon, 
or Gothic. 

440. Seminar in Literature. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Topics will vary. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

441. Seminar in Linguistics. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Topics will vary. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

447. Laboratory Measurement of Phonetics. 4 hours. Electroacoustic analysis of 
spoken German by means of special instruments for automatic graphic recording 
in the German Linguistic Research Laboratory. Prerequisites: Ger. 404 and 
consent of the instructor. 

448. The Structure of Modern German. 4 hours. Structural analysis of modern High 
German by means of modern European and American methods. Prerequisites: 
Ger. 385 and 405. 

490. Independent Study for Graduate Students. 1 to 16 hours. Prerequisite: Consent 
of the instructor. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval 
of the department. 



88 HISTORY 



HISTORY 



Professors: Edward C. Thaden, Chairman of the Department; Shirley A. Bill, 
Bentley Gilbert, Louis Gottschalk (Visiting), Peter d'A. Jones, Stanley 
Mellon, Robert L. Nicholson, Robert V. Remini, Max Savelle (Visiting), John 
B. Wolf 

Associate Professors: James Cracraft, Carolyn A. Edie, Robert L. Hess, Melvin 
G. Holli, George Huppert, Richard Jensen, Ronald Legon, Peter McKeon, 
Richard Millman, Karl A. Schleunes 

Assistant Professors: Ira Berlin, Burton J. Bledstein, Robert E. Conrad, 
Gerald A. Danzer, Arthur Donovan, William A. Hoisington, David Jordan, 
Charles R. McKirdy, Marion S. Miller (Visiting), David S. Patterson, Michael 
Perman, James J. Robbins, Peter Stanley, Joan Scott 

The Department of History offers work leading to the Master of Arts and 
the Doctor of Philosophy. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a grade-point average of at least 4.000 for the last 
90 quarter hours of undergraduate study. Students with averages below 4.000 
but above 3.750 are considered on an individual basis. Three letters of 
recommendation from former professors are required of all applicants. 
Students are urged to take the Graduate Record Examination, although it is 
not required. 

Hours: A student must present a Bachelor of Arts with a major in history 
or with a minimum of 24 quarter hours in history or he may petition the 
department for admission. Only in the most exceptional cases will part-time 
students be admitted as Master of Arts candidates. (Full time is defined as 12 
or more quarter hours.) The department may require a candidate to make up 
any deficiencies in his preparation before granting him full standing in the 
graduate program. A minimum of two years of undergraduate training in a 
foreign language is required. 



Degree Requirements 



Master of Arts 

The candidate must pass a comprehensive examination in one major field 
and two minor fields selected from among the following areas of specializa- 
tion: the ancient world, medieval Europe, early modern Europe, modern 



HISTORY 89 

Europe, Russia, Great Britain, America (United States), Africa, imperialism 
and colonialism, and historiography. Candidates are expected to take at least 
12 hours in each of two of these fields of specialization. A minimum of 48 
quarter hours is required for the degree, 16 of which must be at the 400 level. 
Of these 16 hours, 12 must be in history courses. A student who has done 
graduate work in a recognized institution without receiving a degree may 
petition to receive credit by examination. A thesis is not required. The 
candidate must pass a reading examination in a foreign language relevant to 
his program of study. The language presented to meet this requirement must 
be approved by the department. For work in certain fields, a reading 
knowledge of the particular language or languages relevant to that field may 
be required.* With the approval of the department a student may take a 
minor in another discipline. 

The candidate must maintain an average of at least 4.000. No credit 
toward the degree will be given for any course in which the student receives a 
grade of less than B. 



The Master of Arts Program for Teachers 

The Master of Arts in History includes a special program designed to meet 
the needs of high school and junior college teachers. It provides a wide 
exposure to history, an understanding of historical methodology and practice, 
and preparation in a field outside history. The program emphasizes the 
development of teaching strategies and instructional materials. A person who 
enters the program without professional certification for high school teaching 
may gain certification through additional work. Such arrangements must be 
made in advance. Part-time study is permitted in this program. 

The candidate must present 48 hours of course work and pass written 
examinations in a major field and two minor fields. The major field may be 
selected from the following: the ancient world, medieval Europe, early 
modern Europe, modern Europe, Russia, Great Britain, Asia, Africa, United 
States, Latin America, or world history. The minor fields, one of which will 
ordinarily be taken outside the department, will be developed in consultation 
with an adviser. A candidate normally will take at least 1 2 hours in each of 
his fields. In addition, he must present 12 hours of work in a special 
colloquium in American, European, and world history. Candidates are 
required to take 24 hours in history at the 400 level. A thesis is not required. 
There is no language requirement. A student who has done graduate work in 
a recognized institution without receiving a degree may petition to receive 
credit for that work. The candidate must maintain an average of at least 
4.000. No credit toward the degree will be given for any course in which the 
student receives a grade of less than B. 

*Students who plan to transfer to another school to continue graduate work beyond the 
M.A. are advised to check the foreign language requirements of that school. 



90 HISTORY 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The department offers work leading to the doctorate in the fields of 
European and American history. 

The doctorate in history represents mastery of several general areas of 
historical knowledge and calls for an original contribution to scholarship 
through independent study and research. Ordinarily, the candidate will 
complete a minimum of 48 quarter hours of graduate courses and seminars 
beyond the master's degree. 

The requirement of the Graduate College for the doctorate is 96 quarter 
hours of work beyond the Master of Arts. A student may expect to take 
approximately 48 quarter hours of thesis research. 

Unless the candidate holds a Master of Arts from the University of 
Illinois at Chicago Circle or from an accredited institution and has been 
recommended for further advanced study, he will be expected to take a 
qualifying examination for the M.A. The candidate for the degree must also 
stand for oral and written preliminary examinations. Lastly, he must present 
an acceptable dissertation and defend it in a final oral examination. 

All new applicants for the Ph.D. at Chicago Circle will be evaluated by 
relevant professors after the completion of the first quarter. The department 
may require a student to take an oral examination at that time. 

All Ph.D. candidates must have a reading knowledge of two foreign 
languages. In many fields of history command of a foreign language is 
indispensable for advanced study and research, and it is expected that that 
language will be used in course and seminar work as required. In some fields 
it is recognized that other tools, such as statistical theory, may be equally 
indispensable. 

The program of study for each candidate will be fixed by the candidate 
and his adviser with the approval of the Graduate Advisory Committee of the 
Department of History. 

Candidates must offer one major field of preparation and three minor 
fields, one of which may be outside the department, for the preliminary 
examinations. Two of the minor fields must be either geographically or 
chronologically outside the areas of his major field. The major fields of study 
offered by the department are: European history from 1450 to 1815, 
European history since 1648, American history from 1500 to 1877, 
American history since 1765, Russian history, British history since 1688, 
modern Italian history, and French history. Minor fields in European history 
are the Age of Enlightenment, diplomatic history since 1648, Bourbon 
France, revolutionary and Napoleonic France, Italy since 1789, intellectual 
history since 1815, Great Britain since 1837, imperialism and colonialism, 
historiography; in American history, the fields are economic history, Negro 
history, political parties, urban history, early national period, the Jacksonian 
Era, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the progressive era, and contemporary 
United States. Fields other than those listed may be accepted in individual 
cases. The work that a candidate may offer in other departments shall be 
determined in consultation with his adviser. 



HISTORY 91 



Urban Studies and Negro History. Graduate students will have an 
opportunity to pursue research in American urban studies and Negro history 
in the University's Urban History Manuscript Collection, a rich repository of 
materials dealing with the social, economic, and political history of the 
United States and particularly with the history of the metropolitan Chicago 
area. Through the materials in this collection, students in history will be 
trained in the use of manuscripts as well as other primary materials employed 
in the study and writing of history. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

Note: Graduate students must have background or training appropriate to 
the content of any 300-level course. 

302. Topics in Greek History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of ancient history. 

303. Topics in Roman History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of ancient history. 

306. Topics in Medieval History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of medieval history. 

309. Topics in the Renaissance. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

311. Topics in Sixteenth Century European History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

312. Topics in Seventeenth Century European History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

313. Topics in Eighteenth Century European History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

314. Topics in Nineteenth Century European History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

316. Topics in Twentieth Century European History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 



92 HISTORY 



318. Topics in German History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

321. Topics in British History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

324. Topics in French History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

329. Topics in Italian History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

333. Topics in Eastern European History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

335. Topics in Russian History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of European history. 

341. Topics in African History. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are 
required. Study in depth of specific problems of internal African history, with 
concentration on such topics as the African role in the slave trade, the growth and 
decline of African states, African syntheses with European culture, or the African 
reaction to European domination and conquest. Prerequisite: 4 hours of African 
history. 

351. Topics in Colonial American History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of United States history. 

352. Topics in Revolutionary and Early National United States History. 4 hours. May 

be repeated for credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. 
Specific topics are announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of United States 
history. 

353. Topics in Nineteenth Century United States History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of United States history. 

354. Topics in Twentieth Century United States History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of United States history. 

386. Topics in Race, Ethnic, and Minority History. 4 hours. May be repeated for 
credit. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 



HISTORY 93 



388. Topics in Economic History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

389. Topics in Urban History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

390. Topics in Diplomatic History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

391. Topics in Constitutional History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

392. Topics in Intellectual History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

393. Topics in Historiography. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

394. Topics in Folklore-History Relations. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

395. Topics in Religious History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

396. Topics in the History of Science. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual 
conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are announced each 
quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

397. Topics in the History of Technology. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Specific topics are 
announced each quarter. Prerequisite: 4 hours of history. 

Courses for Graduate Students 

Note: Seminars are generally offered in two-quarter or three-quarter 
sequences. Several seminar sections are offered in European, American, 
and British research topics each year. Students may enroll in more 
than one section. 

400. Colloquium for Teachers of History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Reading 
and discussion of significant primary and secondary sources; investigation and 
development of instructional materials and techniques. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 



94 HISTORY 



413. Seminar on Ancient History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit for a maximum 
of 48 hours. Concurrent registration in more than one section permitted for a 
maximum of 1 6 hours per quarter. 

417. Seminar on Medieval History. 4 hours. 

418. Seminar on Renaissance History. 4 hours. 

420. Colloquium on European History. 4 hours. Reading in topics on European 
history. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

421. Seminar on European History. 4 hours. 

427. Colloquium on African History. 4 hours. Introduction to the literature of African 
history. Prerequisite: 8 hours of African history. 

428. Seminar on African History. 4 hours. 

429. Seminar on Russian History. 4 hours. 

430. Colloquium on Russian History. 4 hours. Reading in topics on Russian history. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

432. Colloquium on British History. 4 hours. Reading in topics on British history. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

433. Seminar on British History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 
48 hours. Concurrent registration in more than one section permitted for a 
maximum of 16 hours per quarter. 

450. Colloquium on American History. 4 hours. Reading in topics in American history. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

451. Seminar on American History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit for a 
maximum of 48 hours. Concurrent registration in more than one section 
permitted for a maximum of 1 6 hours per quarter. 

452. Seminar on Urban History. 4 hours. 

479. Seminar: Theoretical, Historical, and Philosophical Issues in Psychology. 2 hours. 

May be repeated. Same as Philosophy 479 and Psychology 479. Systematic review 
of special topics; emphasis on current approaches and interpretations. Prereq- 
uisite: Consent of the instructor. 

491. Historical Methods. 4 hours. A laboratory course to provide an understanding of 
the study of history and practical application of the methods by which the past is 
reconstructed. 

492. Historiography. 4 hours. Great historians from early times to the present. 



INFORMATION ENGINEERING 95 

497. Research and Writing. to 12 hours. Special problems in research and individual 
guidance in the preparation of master's research essays. 

498. Independent study. to 12 hours. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. 

INFORMATION ENGINEERING 

Professors: James W. Dow, Leon H. Fisher, Philip Parzen 

Associate Professors: Robert C. Arzbaecher, Kurt Burian, Earl E. Gose, Chu 
Quon Lee, Chathilingath K. Sanathanan, Herbert J. Stein, Piergiorgio L.E. 
Uslenghi, Bert L. Zuber 

Assistant Professors: Yun-Leei Chiou, Roger C. Conant, Rucelle L. Consigny, 
Robert A. Dell, John D. Ferguson, Hitoshi Inada, Philip L. Katz, Sharadbabu 
R. Laxpati, Jeffrey Levett, Tadao Murata, Miljenko Orsic, Roland Priemer, 
Howard F. Prosser, Thomas M. Smith, Stephen Tsai 

Instructors: Robert A. Dell, Jr., Philip L. Katz 

The department offers a program leading to the Master of Science in 
Information Engineering and, jointly with the Bioengineering Program, a 
Master of Science in Bioengineering. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants should have a grade-point average of B (4.000) or better for 
the last 90 quarter hours of undergraduate work. Applicants with grade-point 
averages between 3.500 and 4.000 may be admitted upon special 
recommendation of the department. Practicing engineers who wish to return 
to school for further graduate instruction may be admitted on a tentative 
basis if their professional experience makes it appear likely that they will 
succeed in the program. This tentative admission will be made permanent 
after the completion of at least 16 quarter hours with a grade-point average of 
4.000 or better. 



Master of Science in Information Engineering 

Specialization in information engineering allows a broad choice of topics, 
including circuit theory, electromagnetic field theory, communication theory, 
automatic control theory, solid state electronics, and computer science. This 
program is similar to that in electrical engineering elsewhere and is offered for 



96 INFORMATION ENGINEERING 

graduates of information engineering-oriented curricula at the University of 
Illinois at Chicago Circle and for graduates of electrical engineering or similar 
curricula elsewhere. Graduates of other scientifically oriented curricula may 
be admitted if they have the background to profit from graduate work in this 
field. 

Degree Requirements 

A grade-point average of at least 4.000 is required for the Master of 
Science. No credit is given for any course in which a grade of less than C has 
been obtained. For graduation, 48 quarter hours are required, with the 
following additional minimum requirements: 

The successful completion of a thesis, research project, design project, or 
extensive reading assignment to be followed by a written report and 
an oral examination, for which the student will receive credit for at 
least 4 and not more than 16 quarter hours. 
The completion of at least 20 quarter hours (including thesis credit) in 
information engineering courses at the 400 level, including Infor- 
mation Engineering 410, Advanced Linear Systems, and 420, Electro- 
magnetic Field Theory. 



Master of Science in Bioengineering 

Specialization in bioengineering trains the student in the application of 
engineering concepts and methods to the life sciences and medicine. Areas 
covered include: the application of the principles of information processing 
communication and control theory to living systems; cybernetics, artificial 
intelligence and pattern recognition; bioinstrumentation, prostheses and 
artificial organs; and some aspects of biophysics. This program is offered for 
graduates of life sciences, physical sciences, or engineering curricula. Students 
from the life sciences are expected to emphasize mathematics, engineering, 
and physical sciences in their initial course work; students from the physical 
sciences are expected to concentrate initially on the life sciences. Bioengineer- 
ing course work is offered through the Department of Information Engineering. 



Degree Requirements 

Degree requirements are identical to those for students specializing in 
information engineering except that bioengineering students must complete 
at least 28 quarter hours of graduate courses in the College of Engineering, at 
least 20 of which (including thesis credit) shall be in information engineering 
courses at the 400 level. Information Engineering 410 and 420 are not 
required of students who specialize in bioengineering. 



INFORMATION ENGINEERING 97 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

307. Cybernetics I. 4 hours. Same as Systems Engineering 307. Introduction to 
artificial intelligence and pattern recognition by computer. Programs for playing 
games, proving theorems, answering questions, and making medical diagnoses. 
Property selection and decision making techniques. Prerequisites: Math. 195 and 
either 250 or 370. 

311. Linear Systems Analysis. 4 hours. No graduate credit for majors in information 
engineering. Application of signal representations discussed in Information 
Engineering 212 to the analysis of linear systems; transform methods and 
frequency analysis; natural response, stability; signal flow graphs; Laplace 
transform with two variables; convolution integral and applications. Prerequisite: 
InfE. 212. 

312. Introduction to Communication Engineering. 4 hours. Communication systems; 
amplitude, frequency, and pulse-type modulation; correlation and correlation 
functions; noise and noise calculations; channel capacity and bandwidth signal to 
noise ratio applications. Prerequisites: InfE. 311 and 340. 

315. Intermediate Network Analysis. 4 hours. Network theorems; introduction to 
topological approaches in general linear network analysis; loop, node, and state 
variable equations; network functions; the positive and real concept. Prerequisite: 
InfE. 311. 

316. Introduction to Network Synthesis. 4 hours. Continues Information Engineering 
315. Covers positive real functions, I^C synthesis, RC, RL, and RLC synthesis, 
and filter design. Individual projects are required. Prerequisite : InfE. 315. 

320. Introductory Wave Propagation and Transmission. 5 hours. No graduate credit for 
majors in information engineering. Transmission line theory and introduction to 
waveguides; elementary antenna theory. Prerequisite: InfE. 221. 

324. Wave Propagation and Radiation I. 4 hours. Maxwell's equations and electro- 
magnetic waves. Analysis of wave propagation in rectangular and circular 
waveguides. Reduction of waveguide discontinuity problems to equivalent 
network problems. Prerequisites: InfE. 311 and 320. 

325. Wave Propagation and Radiation II. 4 hours. Antennas and radiating systems. 
Radiation from a quarter-wave monopole or half-wave dipole. Antenna 
impedance. Directional characteristics of antennas. Antenna practice and design. 
Prerequisite: InfE. 324. 

326. Wave Propagation and Radiation III. 4 hours. Motion of charged particles in 
fields. Principles of klystrons, magnetrons, and traveling wave tubes. Introduction 
to solid state parametric devices. Prerequisite: InfE. 325. 

330. Communication Theory I. 4 hours. With Information Engineering 31, an 
introduction to statistical communication theory. Signal spectra, modulation, 
noise, probability theory; applications of statistics to communication systems. 
Prerequisite: InfE. 312. 



98 INFORMATION ENGINEERING 



331. Communication Theory II. 4 hours. Continues Information Engineering 330. 
Individual projects are required. Prerequisite: InfE. 330. 

340. Intermediate Electronics. 4 hours. Continues Information Engineering 240. No 
graduate credit for majors in information engineering. Applications of tubes, 
transistors, and semiconductor diodes; practical laboratory experience. Prereq- 
uisite: InfE. 240. 

342. Solid State Electronics. 4 hours. Semiconductor physics and semiconductor 
circuits. Physics and circuit properties of transistors, semiconductor diodes, and 
other semiconductor devices; practical laboratory experience. Prerequisite: InfE. 
340. 

344. Electronic Applications I. 4 hours. With Information Engineering 345, a 
discussion of devices and circuits involved in pulse, digital, and switching 
waveforms. Prerequisite: InfE. 340. 

345. Electronic Applications II. 4 hours. Continues Information Engineering 344. 
Prerequisite: InfE. 344 and credit or registration in InfE. 342. 

347. Thin Film Devices. 4 hours. Introduction to vacuum technology. Methods of 
fabrication of films; sputtering, evaporation, electron beam evaporation, and 
chemical deposition. Physical properties of films. Application of films; resistor, 
capacitor, transistor, diode, magnetic memory devices, and superconductors. 
Prerequisites: InfE. 342 and MatE. 230. 

350. Prostheses and Artificial Organs. 4 hours. The special problems encountered in the 
design of organ replacements as engineering devices. Sub-organ replacements, 
circulatory assist devices, artificial kidneys and other organ systems. Prerequisites: 
InfE. 200, 383, 384, MatE. 230, and EnrE. 211; or the equivalents. 

352. Biocontrol. 3 hours. Demonstration of the applicability of the control systems 
theory to physiological systems, including the pupil system, eye and hand 
movement systems, utilizing techniques such as Fourier analysis, Nyquist stability 
criteria and cross-correlation. Prerequisites: InfE. 311, and 383 or 384. 

353. Biocontrol Laboratory. 3 hours. Experimental counterpart of Information 
Engineering 352. Motor coordination, crayfish photoreceptor, human pupil, eye 
movement. Prerequisite: Credit or registration in InfE. 352. 

354. Bioinstru mentation: Transducers. 4 hours. Consideration of energy conversion; 
detailed discussion of transducers used in biological research. Prerequisites: InfE. 
240 and 311. 

360. Automatic Control Theory I. 4 hours. Introductory mathematical preliminaries of 
control systems. Concept of feedback; transfer functions of typical electrical, 
mechanical, and hydraulic control systems; state variable representation of 
systems; signal flow graphs; implications of feedback on system performance; 
time domain analysis; stability concepts including Lyapunov, Routh-Hurwitz, and 
Nyquist stability criteria. Laboratory assignments include experimental 
determination of the response of typical control systems and analog computer 
simulations. Prerequisite: InfE. 311 or SysE. 312. 



INFORMATION ENGINEERING 99 



361. Automatic Control Theory II. 4 hours. Continues Information Engineering 360. 
Introduction to the design of feedback control systems, frequency response 
methods, root locus, Nichols chart, compensation techniques; modern control 
theory, matrix representation of linear systems and mode interpretations, 
concepts of controllability and observability; and linear time-varying systems. 
Projects involving intensive studies on servo systems and extensive simulations on 
digital or analog computers. Prerequisite: InfE. 360. 

371. Computer Structure and Language. 4 hours. Computer structure and machine 
language, addressing techniques, components and circuits to execute the machine 
language instructions, digital representation of data, symbolic coding and 
programming techniques, computer system organization. Prerequisites: InfE. 340; 
Math. 195 and 340. 

372. Discrete Mathematics in Computer Design. 3 hours. Basic set algebra, algebraic 
structures, Boolean algebra and propositional logic, and their applications to the 
design of switching circuits, graph theory, and applications. Prerequisite: InfE. 
371. 

373. Switching Theory and Applications. 3 hours. Nondecimal number systems; error 
correcting and other codes, analysis of gating components and networks, truth 
tables, combinational networks, threshold logic, regular expressions, synthesis of 
sequential circuits, iterative and symmetric network. Prerequisite: InfE. 372. 

379. Real-Time Data Processing. 4 hours. Theory and techniques of data processing 
using analog and digital computers. Emphasis on the unique computational 
problems presented by biological data, illustrating the practical use of 
communication theory. Prerequisites: Math. 195 and 220. 

383. Animal Physiology I. 5 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 363. The role of the 
digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and osmoexcretory systems in the maintenance 
of organismic homeostasis. Emphasis on vertebrates. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: InfE. 284. 

384. Animal Physiology II. 5 hours. Same as Biological Sciences 364. The role of the 
muscular, sensory, nervous, and endocrine systems in the maintenance of 
organismic integration. Emphasis on vertebrates. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: InfE. 284. 

391. Seminar. 1 to 4 hours. Topics to be arranged. 

393. Special Problems. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Special problems or 
reading by arrangement with the faculty. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

408. Cybernetics II. 4 hours. Comparison of natural and artificial intelligence and 
pattern recognition. Information processing in nets. Image processing, . Models of 
retinal and brain structure, thought, learning, and memory. Prerequisite: InfE. 
307. 



100 INFORMATION ENGINEERING 



409. Pattern Recognition Techniques and Systems. 4 hours. Functions and systems of 
functions, such as machines that are designed to learn the common properties of a 
set of N-dimensional vectors of patterns representing samples of a class, and to 
recognize a new vector as a possible member of the class by noting that it has 
properties common to those of the set of sample vectors. Prerequisites: SysE. 372 
and 451 or InfE. 307. 

410. Advanced Linear Analysis. 4 hours. Analysis of linear networks and systems in the 
time and frequency domains. Basis of loop and node equations. Signal flow 
graphs, transform methods, state variable representation, stability. Prerequisites: 
InfE. 311 and credit or registration in Math. 30. 

412. Network Synthesis I. 3 hours. Conventional methods of passive network 
synthesis. Positive real functions. Synthesis of LC, RC, RL, and RLC one-ports. 
Transfer function synthesis and insertion-loss synthesis. Prerequisites: InfE. 316 
and credit or registration in Math. 330. 

413. Network Synthesis II. 3 hours. Active network synthesis. Properties and practical 
realization of active and nonreciprocal network elements. Synthesis of active RC 
networks with NIC and controlled sources. Prerequisite: InfE. 412. 

414. Network Synthesis III. 3 hours. Approximation methods of network functions in 
both frequency and time domain. Practical filter design. N-port network 
synthesis. Current topics on network synthesis. Prerequisite: InfE. 413. 

415. Network Topology. 4 hours. Network theoretic graph theory; tree, incidence, 
circuit and cut-set matrices and their properties; topological analysis and synthesis 
of electrical and transport network; role of network topology in computer-aided 
network analysis and design. Prerequisite: InfE. 410. 

420. Electromagnetic Field Theory. 4 hours. Transmission lines, guided waves, 
radiation from antennas. Prerequisites: InfE. 324 and credit or registration in 
Math. 330. 

421. Advanced Electromagnetic Field Theory. 4 hours. Advanced study of electro- 
magnetic field concepts, including uniqueness and reciprocity theorems, 
Huyghen's and Babinet's principles, reaction concept, variational methods, and 
applications to several coordinate systems. Prerequisite: InfE. 420. 

422. Advanced Microwave Theory. 4 hours. General solution for fields in waveguides 
of arbitrary cross section. Microwave network analysis. Microwave devices, 
microwave cavities, and microwave filters. Prerequisite: InfE. 420. 

423. Antenna Theory and Design. 4 hours. Theory and design of antennas and 
radiating systems. Analysis of linear, circular, and helical radiation elements. 
Reciprocity theorems. Antenna arrays. Slot, horn, and reflector type antennas. 
Prerequisites: InfE. 325 and 420. 

430. Advanced Communication Theory I. 4 hours. Beginning graduate course in 
modern communication theory. Review of probability theory, random 
waveforms, optimum receiver principle. Prerequisite: InfE. 331. 



INFORMATION ENGINEERING 101 



431. Advanced Communication Theory II. 4 hours. Continues Information Engineering 
430. Efficient signaling for message sequences and implementation of coded 
systems. Prerequisite: InfE. 430. 

432. Advanced Communication Theory HI. 4 hours. Continues Information 
Engineering 431. Channel models, filter-signal channel, bandpass channel, fading 
channel. Linear modulation, twisted modulation, frequency modulation, channel 
capacity, pulse-code modulation. Prerequisite: InfE. 431. 

439. Seminar in Behavior and Information Theory. 3 hours. Topics in the application 
of information theory to behavior; emphasis on infra-human behavior. Prereq- 
uisite: Math. 370 or InfE. 408 or Psch. 470. 

440. Solid State Device Theory. 4 hours. Study of electrical phenomena in solids, using 
quantum mechanics. Semiconductors, p-n junctions, transistors. Hall effect, 
thermal and optical effects. Prerequisites: InfE. 342 and Phys. 321. 

441. Integrated Solid State Devices. 4 hours. Applications of solid state theory to 
modern integrated circuits. Active and passive semiconductors, active and passive 
functional blocks, MOS and thin film devices. Prerequisites: InfE. 316 and 440. 

451. Advanced Biocontrol. 3 hours. Mathematical modeling and analysis of biological 
systems, emphasizing techniques of control engineering. Prerequisite: InfE. 353. 

452. Advanced Biocontrol Laboratory. 3 hours. Laboratory experiments in conjunc- 
tion with Information Engineering 451. Experience with control systems of pupil, 
eye movement, sensory motor coordination. Prerequisite: Credit or registration in 
InfE. 451. 

453. Advanced Systems Physiology. 3 hours. Intensive treatment of selected neuro- 
physiological topics; emphasis on systems organization. Prerequisite: InfE. 353. 

454. Advanced Systems Physiology Laboratory. 2 hours. Coding in the frog's retina 
using microelectrode techniques. Prerequisite: InfE. 453. 

457. Analysis of Visual Systems. 4 hours. An advanced course covering in detail 
important research areas of the visual system. The fundamental importance of 
physical, chemical, and physiological processes as related to vision is stressed. 
Prerequisite: InfE. 453. 

460. Advanced Control Theory. 4 hours. Analysis of multivariable, multiloop control 
systems. Advanced topics in state space, time varying and distributed parameter 
systems, stability, controllability, and observability. Introduction to adaptive 
control. Various computer applications. Prerequisite: InfE. 361. 

461. Nonlinear Control. 4 hours. Classification of nonlinear phenomena, linear and 
piecewise linear approximations. The describing function and on-off servo- 
mechanisms, phase plane techniques, limit cycle, stability concepts. Use of analog, 
digital, and hybrid computers for simulation. Prerequisite: InfE. 361. 



102 INFORMATION ENGINEERING 



462. Synthesis Techniques in Linear Control. 4 hours. Design principles. Cascade 
compensation using root locus, polar and log plots, feedback compensation. 
Applications in electrical, electromechanical, and fluid control. Mitrovic's 
parameter plane methods. Prerequisite: InfE. 361. 

463. Statistical and Sampled Data Control. 4 hours. Basic principles of statistical 
design; random signals in a control system; properties of correlation function; 
optimalrty. Wiener-Hopf equation. Design of systems with constraints. 
Introduction to sampled data control; the sampling process; Z transform methods; 
stability, time and frequency response, compensation techniques. Prerequisites: 
InfE. 330 and 361. 

470. Automata Theory. 4 hours. Definition and representation, equivalent states, 
congruence relations, decision problems of finite automata, the halting problem, 
state assignment problem, partitions, growing automata, probabilistic automata, 
self-repairing and self-reproducing systems. Prerequisite: InfE. 373. 

471. Advanced Switching Theory. 4 hours. Principles of sequential circuit synthesis, 
structure of combinational switching circuits, the covering problem, multiple 
output and multilevel combinational circuits, bilateral switching networks, speed 
independent switching circuit theory. Prerequisite: InfE. 373. 

472. Hybrid Computation Theory and Techniques. 4 hours. Basic characteristics of 
analog and digital computers, nature of problems best suited for analog, digital, 
and hybrid computers, organization of a hybrid computer, analog digital 
conversion, hybrid computing techniques with examples from different 
disciplines. Prerequisite: InfE. 373. 

484. Bioinstrumentation: Systems. 3 hours. Analysis of systems used in biological and 
medical instrumentation. General principles and specific electrical, mechanical, 
and optical aspects of instrumentation systems. 

495. Individual Research. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated. Research on special problems 
not included in graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

498. Seminar in Bioengineering. 1 to 4 hours. May be repeated. Systematic review of 
special topics; emphasis on current research. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Thesis work under the 
supervision of a graduate adviser. 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING 103 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING 

Professors: Ernest F. Masur, Head of the Department; Thomas H. Blewitt, 
David W. Levinson, William Rostoker, John A. Schey, Thomas C.T. Ting 

Associate Professors: Robert F. Domagala, James M. Doyle, Gordon H. 
Geiger, Daniel F. Schoeberle, Albert B. Schultz, Surendra P. Shah, Otto E. 
Widera, Chien H. Wu 

Assistant Professors: Ted B. Belytschko, Graham M. Brown Robert H. 
Bryant, Donald G. Lemke, Thomas M. Mulcahy, Charles A. Moore, Marshall 
Silver, Michael J. Weins 

The department offers a program leading to the Master of Science in 
Mechanics and Materials. Jointly with the Department of Energy Engineering 
it offers a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering (Solids 
and Fluids). 

The M.S. program covers a broad range of topics and may be used either 
as a terminal program for those planning to seek employment after obtaining 
the degree or as a basis for further studies. The courses offered within this 
program are relevant to many professional disciplines. Because of extensive 
freedom in course selection, a student may prepare himself for a career in 
such diverse areas of concentration as metallurgy, soil mechanics and 
foundations, structures (including concrete technology), and engineering 
mechanics. Interdisciplinary programs are permitted and encouraged. 

After admission to the Graduate College the student selects a depart- 
mental adviser with whom a tentative course program is planned. This may be 
revised periodically in consultation with the adviser. Moreover, the student is 
free to change his adviser if he feels that such a change may be useful in the 
pursuit of his particular specialty. 

The department does not have prescribed study programs or required 
courses. The selection of courses is therefore entirely up to the student and 
his adviser; however, satisfaction of the degree requirements requires 
departmental verification. 

The joint Ph.D. program includes several areas of specialization, of which 
the Department of Materials Engineering covers the fields of continuum 
mechanics, metallurgy, soil engineering, and structures. Students are 
permitted and encouraged to follow interdisciplinary programs which include 
more than one area of specialization and may require taking courses in more 
than one department. 



Admission Requirements 

Graduates from recognized engineering colleges will be admitted if they 
have maintained a grade-point average of B (4.000) or better in undergraduate 



104 MATERIALS ENGINEERING 



study. Those with lower averages may be admitted upon recommendation of 
the department, providing they satisfy the minimum requirements of the 
Graduate College. Practicing engineers who wish to return to school for 
graduate instruction may be admitted on a limited status if their professional 
experience makes it appear likely that they will be able to follow the program 
successfully. This limited admission will become permanent after the 
completion of at least 16 quarter hours with an average of 4.000 or better. 

Degree Requirements 

A grade-point average of at least 4.000 is required. Credit toward a 
graduate degree is not given for any course in which a grade of less than C has 
been obtained. 



Master of Science 

Forty-eight quarter hours are required; of these at least 16 must be in 
courses at the 400 level. Because of the diversity of the department offerings 
and areas of concentration the department does not prescribe any specific 
courses. However, to insure adequate breadth, the following distribution is 
required: 

At least two courses in mathematics. 

At least two courses (other than those in mathematics) outside the 
student's area of specialization. It may often be desirable to take 
these two courses outside the Department of Materials Engineering. 
The satisfaction of these distribution requirements is subject to departmental 
verification. 

The student may, at his discretion* and in consultation with his adviser, 
elect to take up to 12 hours of Materials Engineering 499, Thesis Research. In 
order to obtain credit he has the following options: 

A. For 1 to 4 hours of credit— a report on his work, to be evaluated by 
his adviser. 

B. For 5 to 8 hours of credit— a report on his work, to be evaluated by a 
department committee. 

C. For 9 to 12 hours of credit— a thesis based on original work. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

To become a candidate for the doctorate a student must pass a 
departmental qualifying examination. This examination may be waived if the 
student has attained a graduate grade-point average of 4.500 or better. 

Approximately 48 quarter hours of course work beyond the M.S. (or the 
equivalent) are required. There are no specific course requirements. However, 

*In the metallurgy area of concentration a thesis (option C) is required. 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING 105 



at least two courses must be taken in the Department of Energy Engineering. 
Interdisciplinary and interdepartmental programs involving other depart- 
ments, especially the Department of Energy Engineering, are also encouraged. 
Toward the end of his course work the student is required to pass a 
preliminary examination administered by a faculty committee. 

A major requirement of the Ph.D. program is the completion of a thesis 
based on a program of original research, which is carried out and written 
under the supervision of a faculty committee of at least five members. The 
thesis must be defended before the committee and the public in an 
examination, notice of which appears in an official campus publication. 

The number of credit hours required for the doctoral thesis is not fixed 
and is adjustable in accordance with the regulations of the Graduate College. 
Although formal thesis research often does not start until completion of the 
preliminary examination requirements, it is also common to initiate an 
informal research program while the student is still involved in course work. 

Reading proficiency in one foreign language is required. The language 
must be French, German, or Russian unless the student is able to demonstrate 
to the department that a sufficient body of literature in his field of study 
exists in a substitute language. The language requirement is satisfied by 
passing the E.T.S. foreign language examination or by completing language 
courses with a grade of at least B, or by translating a technical paper selected 
by the department. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

302. Applied Elasticity I. 4 hours. Variational theorems of elasticity theory. 
Application to establishment and solution of approximate systems; beams 
(including shear deformations) and plates. Introduction to instability theory. 
Prerequisite: MatE. 205 or 206. 

303. Theory of Elasticity I. 4 hours. The boundary value problems of linear isotropic 
elasticity theory. Uniqueness of solution. Reduction to two dimensions: the plane 
problem, torsion, bending. General orthogonal coordinates and special application 
to polar coordinates. Three-dimensional problems with axial symmetry. Prereq- 
uisite: MatE. 316. 

304. Experimental Stress Analysis. 4 hours. Structural similitude and dimensional 
analysis. Brittle coating. Introduction to photoelasticity. Strain measurement 
techniques. Prerequisite: MatE. 206. 

308. Intermediate Vibration Theory. 4 hours. Analytical and numerical treatment of 
vibrations induced in n-degrees of freedom linear discrete systems by periodic, 
shock, and random excitation. Prerequisite: MatE. 208. 



311. Intermediate Dynamics. 4 hours. Kinematics of a point; space curves. Particle 
dynamics, orbital motion, and stability. Moving reference frames. Rigid body 



106 MATERIALS ENGINEERING 



dynamics: the inertia tensor, Euler's equations, application to gyroscopic motion. 
Hamilton's principle. Generalized coordinates. Lagrange's equations. Prereq- 
uisites: MatE. 102 and Math. 220. 

312. Nonlinear Oscillations. 4 hours. Exact and approximate methods of studying 
vibrations of nonlinear systems. Analytical and graphical techniques. Forced 
oscillations, self-excited systems, stability criteria. Computer methods. Practical 
applications. Prerequisite: MatE. 208. 

313. Applied Dynamics. 4 hours. Application of principles of dynamics to engineering 
physics. Balancing; rolling and sliding contact, static and dynamic force analyses 
of machine elements. Critical speeds. Impact loading. Prerequisite: MatE. 311. 

316. Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. 4 hours. Same as Energy Engineering 316. 
Cartesian tensors, kinematics of fluids and solids, conservation equations, 
constitutive equations for simple materials. Examples. Prerequisites: EnrE. 211 or 
MatE. 204; Math. 220. 

321. Structural Analysis II. 4 hours. Establishment of basic equations governing linear 
structural systems. Matrix inversion and relaxation solutions. Approximate 
analyses. Introduction to dynamics of structures. Prerequisite: MatE. 207. 

322. Concrete Technology I. 4 hours. Relations between microproperties and 
macroproperties; mechanisms of fracture, creep, and shrinkage; statistical aspects; 
air entrainment; special types of concrete. Individual research project involving 
laboratory and analytic techniques. 3 hours, lecture; 2 hours, laboratory. 
Prerequisite: MatE. 203 or the equivalent. 

324. Limit Analysis and Design of Structures. 4 hours. Boundedness principles of 
perfect plasticity. Application to analysis and design of structures. Prerequisite: 
MatE. 207. 

325. Concrete Design of Shell and Plate Structures. 4 hours. Derivation of membrane 
and bending theories for shells of revolution, folded plates, and shell of single and 
double curvature. Application to barrel roofs, domes, and storage tanks. 
Prerequisites: Math. 220 and MatE. 225 or 302. 

326. Design in Prestressed and Precast Concrete. 4 hours. Behavior and design of 
prestressed and precast concrete structures. Prestressing systems; problems of 
shrinkage, creep, and anchorage. Design of beams, slabs, containment vessels, and 
piles. Design of precast concrete building systems. Prerequisite: MatE. 225. 

331. Electron Theory of Metals. 3 hours. Modern physical concepts of metals and 
alloys. Introduction to wave mechanics. Thermal, electrical, and magnetic 
properties of metals. Band theory of metals. Prerequisite: MatE. 252. 

332. Advanced Diffraction Analysis. 3 hours. Single crystal methods in X-ray 
diffraction, orientation determination, pole figures, structure determination, 
precision lattice constant methods. Prerequisite: MatE. 239 or the equivalent. 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING 107 



333. Design Use of Materials. 4 hours. Extreme value statistics, mechanical effects of a 
notch. Fracture mechanics. Fatigue. Stress rupture. Residual stress effects. 
Relationships of designed performance. Prerequisite: MatE. 230. 

334. Metallurgy of Nuclear Materials. 3 hours. Uses of materials for the production of 
nuclear energy, environmental problems associated with radiation damage, 
mechanical and physical property changes, swelling, poisoning, fission, modera- 
tion, neutron capture, and latent activity. Prerequisites: MatE. 252 and Phys. 114. 

335. Electron Microscopy. 3 hours. The electron microscope and its application to the 
study of surface replicas and thin films of metals, alloys, and other materials. 
Sources of contrast. Selected area diffraction. Prerequisites: MatE. 239 and 252. 

337. Process Metallurgy of Iron and Steelmaking. 4 hours. Physicochemical principles 
applied to reduction, conversion, and refining of steel and ferrous alloys. 
Applications of thermodynamics to equilibrium problems, such as slag-metal 
equilibria, and applications of process engineering principles to the dynamic 
behavior of various component systems, such as sinter plants, blast furnaces, and 
basic oxygen furnaces. Prerequisite: MatE. 243. 

338. Particulate Solids Processing. 4 hours. Characterization of particulate solids by 
size and shape. Size classification and reduction processes. Wet and dry separation 
processes. Transportation and agglomeration of particulate solids. Fluidized beds 
and fluidization. Prerequisite: EnrE. 234 or MatE. 248. 

341. Theoretical Soil Mechanics I. 3 hours. Theories used in soil mechanics. Derivation 
of theoretical relationships and theoretical implications of empirical laws. 
Theories of deformation of soil systems; states of stress and deformation in soil 
masses; one-dimensional theory of consolidation for homogeneous and nonhomo- 
geneous clay layers; seepage as a function of isotropy and homogeneity. 
Prerequisite: MatE. 260. 

342. Theoretical Soil Mechanics II. 4 hours. Stresses and displacements in earth masses. 
The analysis of layered systems: analytical, finite difference, finite element 
methods. Settlement analysis: soil- structure interaction. Analysis of structural 
response of flexible and rigid pavements. Development of problem-oriented 
computer languages for settlements. Prerequisites: MatE. 341 and Math. 322. 

343. Theoretical Soil Mechanics III. 4 hours. Seepage through earth masses; derivation 
of basic equations; analytical and numerical methods of solution; rapid 
drawdown. Stability of earth slopes; derivation of basic relationships; methods of 
Fellenius, Bishop, Morganstern. Computer methods for slope stability and 
seepage; problem-oriented languages. Prerequisite: Math. 322. 

344. Physical-Chemical Principles of Soil Behavior I. 4 hours. Clay mineralogy, soil 
formation and composition, sedimentation, mineral identification, colloidal 
phenomena in soils. Prerequisite: MatE. 260. 

345. Physical-Chemical Principles of Soil Behavior II. 4 hours. Swelling, ion associa- 
tion, soil-water analysis of mechanical behavior of soils in terms of physio- 
chemical principles, and conduction phenomena. Prerequisite: MatE. 344. 



108 MATERIALS ENGINEERING 



346. Physical-Chemical Principles of Soil Behavior III. 4 hours. Deformation 
mechanisms and strength, compaction, frost action, rate processes, such as 
secondary compression, creep, thixotropy. Prerequisite: MatE. 345. 

360. Deformation Processing. 4 hours. Principles of deformation processes. Basic 
methods of problem solving. Practices and process control. Relations between 
processing and finished properties. Prerequisite: MatE. 230. 

361. Deformation Processing Laboratory. 1 hour. Measurement of flow stress and 
formability. Effect of friction in forging, rolling, and deep drawing. Limiting 
reductions, optimum die angles in drawing. Effect of plastic anisotropy in deep 
drawing. Prerequisite: MatE. 360. 

362. Powder Metallurgy. 3 hours. Physical attributes of fine powders. Mechanics of 
pressing. Theories of solid state sintering. Liquid phase sintering. Manufacturing 
aspects. Prerequisite: MatE. 230. 

363. Advanced Phase Diagrams. 3 hours. Ternary phase equilibria in metal systems. 
Vertical and horizontal sections, methods of construction and interpretation. 
Examination of quaternary and more complex systems. Application of thermo- 
dynamic principles to construction. Prerequisite: MatE. 250. 

384. Design in Material Processes. 3 hours. Design and optimization of chemical and 
mechanical metallurgical processing systems. Process modeling and analysis. 
Direct search linear and dynamic programming solutions of process problems. 
Economic analysis and investment strategy. Prerequisite: MatE. 243 or 244, or 
EnrE. 234. 

391. Seminar. 1 hour. Topics to be arranged. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

393. Special Problems. 2 to 4 hours. Special problems or reading by special 
arrangement with the faculty. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

402. Applied Elasticity II. 4 hours. Development of classical plate equation and 
boundary conditions; solution of problems in rectangular and polar coordinates; 
energy principles; plates with variable thickness; large deflection theory; effect of 
shear deformations. Prerequisite: MatE. 302. 

403. Theory of Elasticity II. 4 hours. Review of complex variable theory, application 
to torsion, bending, and plane problem. The general three-dimensional problem, 
stress functions, singularities. Introduction to elasto kinetics. Prerequisite: MatE. 
303. 

404. Plasticity I. 4 hours. Basic postulates of plasticity. Yield conditions and associated 
flow laws. Torsion of cylindrical and prismatic bars. Generalized stresses and 
strain rates. Theorem of limit analysis. Application of limit analysis to plane 
problems, plates, and shells. Prerequisite: MatE. 316. 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING 109 



406. Theory of Shells. 4 hours. Differential geometry; geometry of deformation; 
equations of equilibrium; energy theories; membrane theory; general bending 
theory. Application to shells of different geometry. Prerequisites: MatE. 302 and 
Math. 322. 

408. Theory of Viscoelasticity. 4 hours. Establishment of the field equations of 
viscoelastic materials and mathematical techniques of solving these equations. 
Prerequisites: MatE. 303 and Math. 322. 

411. Vibrations of Structural Elements. 4 hours. Analytic and numerical treatment of 
vibrations in elastic strings, beams, plates, etc. Prerequisite: MatE. 308. 

412. Wave Propagation in Solids I. 4 hours. Stress wave propagation in solids; emphasis 
on waves involving one space variable in linear and nonlinear materials. Analytical 
and experimental techniques. Laboratory demonstrations. Prerequisites: MatE. 
302 and Math. 322. 

413. Wave Propagation in Solids II. 4 hours. Wave propagation in solids which involve 
more than one space variable. Waves in a half-space due to a pulse on the surface 
or inside the half-space. Waves in cylindrical rods, beams, and plates. Scattering 
problems. Wave front analysis by geometrical optics. Prerequisites: MatE. 412. 

419. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics I. 4 hours. Same as Energy Engineering 419. 
Kinematics and fundamental laws of mechanics. General constitutive equations; 
reduced constitutive equations. Homogeneous motions of simple bodies. Isotropic 
group, simple fluids, simple solids, simple subfluids. Examples. Prerequisite: 
MatE. 316. 

420. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics II. 4 hours. Same as Energy Engineering 420. 
Special classes of materials. Simple fluids, viscometric flows, the Weissenberg 
effect. Isotropic elastic materials, exact solutions. Wave propagation. Thermo- 
dynamics. Nonlinear viscoelastic materials, polar materials and other materials. 
Prerequisite: MatE. 419 or EnrE. 419. 

421. Structural Analysis III. 4 hours. Application of matrix, numerical, and computer 
techniques to the analysis of complex structural systems. Prerequisite: MatE. 321 
or the equivalent. 

422. Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete. 4 hours. Introduction to composite materials; 
properties of steel, concrete, and the bond between steel and concrete. Elastic, 
inelastic, and post-failure behavior of reinforced concrete members. Effects of 
continuity. Effects of time. Probabilities of uncertainties of materials and 
loadings. Analysis of design codes. Prerequisite: MatE. 322. 

423. Elastic Instability I. 4 hours. Principles of elastic instability and their analytical, 
numerical, and experimental treatment. Buckling of columns, frames, rings. 
Lateral and torsional instability. Prerequisite: MatE. 302. A knowledge of partial 
differential equations is required. 

424. Elastic Instability II. 4 hours. General discussion: small displacements super- 
imposed on finite deformations; application to plates and shells; post-buckling 



110 MATERIALS ENGINEERING 



analysis; dynamic instability. Prerequisite: MatE. 423. A knowledge of partial 
differential equations is required. 

432. Dislocation Theory. 4 hours. Nature of dislocation in crystals. Static and dynamic 
behavior. Interaction with solute atoms, precipitates, and other dislocations. 
Effect on mechanical properties. Dislocation interactions, reductions, and 
dislocation arrays. Prerequisite: MatE. 316. 

433. Advanced Mechanical Metallurgy. 4 hours. Mechanical flows of metals and alloys 
from the standpoint of continuum mechanics. Application to basic metal-forming 
operations. Prerequisite: MatE. 316. 

434. Advanced Experimental Methods. 4 hours. First of two courses covering the 
theoretical and operational aspects of advanced materials research methods at an 
advanced level. Design of complex experimental devices. Applications and 
limitations. Treatment of data. Prerequisite: MatE. 230. 

441. Mechanics of Multiphase Systems. 4 hours. Three-dimensional theory of multi- 
phase media including effects of applied forces, thermo-osmosis, electroosmosis, 
and chemical potentials. Three-dimensional theory of consolidation; derivation, 
solution by analytical and numerical means. Analysis of three-dimensional 
consolidation effects. Prerequisites: MatE. 316 and 341. 

442. Strength and Deformation Theories of Soil. 4 hours. Theories of plasticity as 
applied to soil mechanics. Problems of limiting equilibrium. Application of 
plasticity theories to problems of bearing capacity, earth pressure, and slope 
stability. Mechanics of granular systems. Prerequisites: MatE. 316 and 341. A 
knowledge of partial differential equations is required. 

447. Advanced Soil Engineering I. 4 hours. Analysis of displacements of structures due 
to earth deformation. Site exploration; analysis of foundation types; shallow and 
deep foundations; settlements; bearing capacity. Retaining structures. Prereq- 
uisite: MatE. 261. 

461. Advanced Deformation Processing I. 4 hours. Fundamental aspects of yielding 
and ductile failure in important deformation modes. Deformation of crystal 
aggregates and development of textures. Metallurgical changes during defor- 
mation. Effect of plastic flow on basic friction processes. Prerequisite: MatE. 360. 

462. Advanced Deformation Processing II. 4 hours. Interactions between workpiece 
and equipment Dynamic response of system. Design of process around material. 
Experimental techniques. Prerequisite: MatE. 461. 

463. Fundamentals of Friction, Lubrication, and Wear. 4 hours. Measurement and 
theories of friction. Adhesion between similar and dissimilar materials pairs. 
Mechanisms of wear. Boundary, thin film, hydrodynamic and elastohydrody- 
namic lubrication. Prerequisite: MatE. 230. 

464. Embrittlement Phenomena. 3 hours. Physical characteristics of cracking origi- 
nating from temperature, micro structure, and environment. Theories of the 
origins of embrittlement. Prerequisite: MatE. 333. 



MATHEMATICS 111 



465. Advanced Metallurgical Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Treatment of multicomponent 
system thermodynamics with emphasis on metallurgical process applications. 
Development of relation between structure of metallic solutions, molten salts, and 
quasi-chemical models. Introduction to the relations between defects in nonme- 
tallic crystals and the gas-phase composition. Prerequisite: EnrE. 305. 

493. Special Problems. 1 to 4 hours. Special topics, seminars, or other special activities. 



494. Special Topics in Process Metallurgy. to 4 hours. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 12 hours. Selected topics of special interest in the design and 
analysis of mineral and metal production processes, including transport 
phenomena, physical chemistry, and design, control, and optimization problems. 
Prerequisite: MatE. 248 or the equivalent. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual research: 
reading, design, analytical studies, or laboratory assignments. Culminates in 
report, master's thesis, or doctoral thesis. Examination on report or thesis is 
required. 



MATHEMATICS 

Professors: Joseph Landin, Head of the Department; Harold W. Bailey, 
Norman Blackburn, Herbert J. Curtis, Flora Dinkines, Philip Dwinger, Irwin 
K. Feinstein, Paul Fong, Evelyn Frank, Victor K.A.M. Gugenheim, Norman 
Hamilton, Noboru Ito, Shmuel Kantorovitz, Marvin Knopp, Louis L. Pennisi, 
Reuben I. Sandler, W. Forest Stinespring, Victor Twersky 

Associate Professors: Furio Alberti, Warren H. Brothers, Djairo G. 
DeFigueiredo, David A. Foulser, Louis I. Gordon, Brayton I. Gray, Richard 
Handelsman, Louise Hay, Christoph H. Hering, William A. Howard, William 
H. Kantor, James Kelleher, Richard G. Larson, James W. Moeller, Pramod K. 
Pathak, G.V. Ramanathan, Neil W. Rickert, Robert I. Soare, Alexander P. 
Stone, Avrum I. Weinzweig, Alexander Zabrodsky 

Assistant Professors: Ruth M. Ballard, Neil E. Berger, Bernard Berlowitz, Joel 
Berman, James A. Donaldson, Verena H. Dyson, Helmut Epp, Samuel Feder, 
Gerald L. Gordon, Robert Grannick, Floyd Hanson, Morton E. Harris, Melvin 
L. Heard, Steven L. Jordan, Louis H. Kauffman, Sim Lasher, Jeff E. Lewis, 
Mu-chou Liu, Robert P. Martineau (Visiting), Arthur Pu, Lena Pu, T.E.S. 
Raghavan, Martin Tangora, Glenn Weller, Leo F. Ziomek 

Instructors: Steven L.Jordan 

The department offers graduate work leading to the Master of Arts and 
the Master of Science, the Master of Science in the Teaching of Mathematics, 
and the Doctor of Philosophy. 



112 MATHEMATICS 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a grade-point average of 3.750. The average is 
computed from the last 90 quarter hours of work completed, including 
undergraduate and graduate courses. Students with averages below 3.750 but 
above 3.500 are considered on an individual basis. An applicant must also 
have a 4.000 average in all mathematics courses beyond calculus. 

Students should have 30 quarter hours of undergraduate work in 
mathematics in addition to the usual beginning courses in algebra, trigo- 
nometry, analytic geometry, and calculus. For the master's degree in 
mathematics these 30 hours must include one year of work in analysis 
(equivalent to Mathematics 310, 311, 312) and one year of work in an 
introduction to higher algebra (equivalent to Mathematics 340, 341, 342). 
The remaining hours should be in mathematics courses at the 300 level (or 
their equivalents.) Degree requirements are stated below. 

Applicants are required to take the Graduate Record Examination 
(Verbal, Quantitative, and Advanced) and to submit three letters of 
recommendation from persons familiar with their academic work. If a 
candidate is admitted with deficiencies in courses normally required for 
admission, he must remove such deficiencies during the first three quarters of 
his attendance. No graduate credit is given for such courses. A student who 
has done graduate work at a recognized institution may petition to receive 
credit for such work. 



Degree Requirements 



Master of Arts and Master of Science in Mathematics 

Forty-eight quarter hours are required for the degree. Of these at least 36 
must be in mathematics; at least 20 of the 36 hours must be in approved 
400-level courses. The candidate must pass a written examination, details 
about which may be obtained from the department coordinator of graduate 
studies. A thesis is not required. 

Master of Science in the Teaching of Mathematics 

The purpose of this program is to strengthen the preparation of present 
and future secondary school teachers of mathematics and, in particular, to 
provide courses leading to certification in the State of Illinois for those 
candidates who are not already certified. 

The course requirements provide for the admission of students of varying 
undergraduate backgrounds and include a number of courses required in the 
undergraduate curriculum in teacher education in mathematics. Therefore, 



MATHEMATICS 113 

the requirements may be met either by work completed in the student's 
undergraduate program or by work done in his graduate program, but the 
graduate program must include 48 quarter hours of graduate credit. 

Applicants must meet the required grade-point average stated in the 
general admission requirements and must have completed 30 quarter hours of 
undergraduate mathematics in courses beyond the calculus. 

A candidate must earn 48 quarter hours of graduate credit, of which 24 
hours must be in mathematics, 12 hours in psychology or education, and 12 
hours in electives. At the conclusion of this program the student must have 
completed, either as part of the required 48 hours or as part of his 
undergraduate program, the following: 

1. Mathematics 310 and at least 4 quarter hours of analysis beyond 
Mathematics 310. 

2. Mathematics 340, 341, and at least 4 quarter hours of algebra beyond 
Mathematics 341. 

3. Mathematics 303, 304, 305, and at least 4 quarter hours of geometry 
beyond Mathematics 305. 

4. At least 4 quarter hours in a course concerned with the problems of 
teaching secondary school mathematics. 

5. At least 12 quarter hours of graduate credit in mathematics to be chosen, 
with the approval of his adviser, from logic, finite differences, number 
theory, history of mathematics, topology, computer science, probability 
and statistics, or other fields. 

In addition, he must be eligible for a certificate to teach mathematics at the 
secondary level in the State of Illinois. This requirement may be waived for 
candidates with teaching experience. 

The psychology or education courses and the electives must be chosen 
with the approval of the adviser. In general, the electives will be courses in 
mathematics, psychology, or education. In exceptional cases courses in other 
fields may be used as electives. Courses at the 400 level are not required for 
the degree. 

Candidates whose undergraduate work is comparable to that required at 
Chicago Circle for a Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Mathematics can 
fulfill the requirements in one year. A candidate who has not completed 
comparable work in analysis, algebra, and geometry cannot expect to qualify 
for the degree in one year and will need more than 48 hours of course work 
to fulfill the requirements. 

For further details concerning certification and any other requirements, 
candidates should consult the program advisers, Professors Irwin K. Feinstein 
and Alice Hart. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

Each candidate for the doctorate must pass the master's examination. A 
candidate who has not passed this examination within one year of his 



114 MATHEMATICS 



admission will be dropped from the program. In exceptional circumstances 
the department may extend this time limit. 

The student will choose a major subject from the following: algebra, 
analysis, applied mathematics, geometry, logic, probability and statistics, or 
topology. He must also choose two internal minors from the preceding list or 
one internal minor and one outside minor or a full outside minor. The choice 
of an outside minor must have the approval of the Department of 
Mathematics. The requirements for such a minor should be checked with the 
department concerned. The student will present at least 60 quarter hours in 
400-level mathematics courses, unless he has chosen a full outside minor that 
requires 48 hours. At least three 400-level courses are required for each 
internal minor. Courses must have the approval of the department. Each 
student is required to have 144 hours of graduate credit, of which 48 hours 
will usually be thesis credit. 

Shortly before the completion of 96 hours of graduate course work the 
student should select an adviser to direct a thesis in his major area of interest. 
As soon as possible thereafter, the student must take a preliminary 
examination. The purpose of this examination is to determine if the student 
is prepared to undertake a doctoral research program. The exact point in the 
student's career at which the preliminary examination must be taken is not 
rigidly fixed, but the department will normally drop a student who has not 
passed the preliminary examination within one year of completion of the 96 
hours of course work. In exceptional circumstances the department may 
extend this time limit. Further details regarding the examination may be 
obtained from the graduate coordinator of the department. 

The student must demonstrate reading proficiency in any two of the 
following languages: French, German, or Russian. 

Since the purpose of the doctoral program is to provide training in 
mathematical research and scholarship, the crucial effort is the production of 
a thesis; therefore, under the guidance of the department the student will 
write a thesis that is a significant piece of mathematical research acceptable to 
the department. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

300. Teachers Course I. 4 hours. Graduate credit for this course may be applied only 
toward the course requirements for the Master of Science in the Teaching of 
Mathematics. Important mathematical concepts and the problems involved in the 
teaching thereof; treatment of numeration systems, set relations, functions, whole 
numbers, logic, and proof; examination of some of the major new curricula. 
Prerequisite: Math. 133. 

301. Teachers Course II. 4 hours. Graduate credit for this course may be applied only 
toward the course requirements for the Master of Science in the Teaching of 
Mathematics. Continues Mathematics 300. Topics, discussed from an advanced 
viewpoint, include mathematical induction, the completeness axiom, composition 



MATHEMATICS 115 



of functions, sequences, a vector approach to geometry, axioms of the Hilbert 
type. Prerequisite: Math. 300. 

302. Teachers Course III. 4 hours. Graduate credit for this course may be applied only 
toward the course requirements for the Master of Science in the Teaching of 
Mathematics. Continues Mathematics 301. Topics, discussed from an advanced 
viewpoint, include arithmetic and geometric progressions, continued sums and 
products, difference sequences, pigeon-hole principle, limits, continuity, 
exponential functions, logarithmic functions, circular functions, combinations 
and permutations. Prerequisite: Math. 301. 

303. Advanced Euclidean Geometry I. 4 hours. Graduate credit for this course may be 
applied only toward the course requirements for the Master of Science in the 
Teaching of Mathematics. Geometry from Euclid to the present, equivalents of 
Euclid's fifth postulate, noneuclidean geometries, finite and projective geometries, 
invariants of configurations under transformation. Prerequisite: Math. 133. 

304. Advanced Euclidean Geometry II. 4 hours. Graduate credit for this course may be 
applied only toward the course requirements for the Master of Science in the 
Teaching of Mathematics. The parallel postulate, similarity, area, perpendicu- 
larity, circles and spheres, constructions with ruler and compass. Prerequisite: 
Math. 303. 

305. Advanced Euclidean Geometry HI. 4 hours. Graduate credit for this course may 
be applied only toward the course requirements for the Master of Science in the 
Teaching of Mathematics. Ruler and compass constructions, proportionality, 
length and area, solid mensuration, hyperbolic geometry. Prerequisite: Math. 304. 

307. Theory of Sets and the Real Number System. 5 hours. The elementary set theory 
and the development of the integers, the rational numbers, and the real numbers. 
Prerequisite: Math. 133. 

309 1 Topics in the Teaching of Secondary School Mathematics. 4 hours. May be 

repeated for credit. No more than 8 hours may be used toward the Master of 
Science in the Teaching of Mathematics. Seminars, conferences, or sections on 
special topics and advanced problems for students majoring in mathematics 
education and for in-service teachers who wish to study new-curriculum 
development and special problems in teaching secondary school mathematics. 
Prerequisite: Math. 302. 

310. Advanced Calculus I. 4 hours. Differential and integral calculus of vector fields, 
vector functions, partial differentiation, transformations, improper integrals, 
double and triple integrals, and applications. Prerequisite: Math. 1 33. 

311. Advanced Calculus II. 4 hours. Line and surface integrals, Green's theorem, 
Stokes' theorem, sequences, infinite series, uniform convergence. Prerequisite: 
Math. 310. 

312. Advanced Calculus III. 4 hours. A set of advanced topics selected for applications 
in the physical sciences and in engineering. Prerequisite: Math. 311. 



116 MATHEMATICS 



321. Elementary Differential Equations II. 4 hours. Systems of linear first order 
equations. Boundary value problems for second order linear equations, intro- 
duction to partial differential equations. Nonlinear problems described by one or 
two differential equations of first order. Prerequisite: Math. 220. 

322. Elementary Partial Differential Equations I. 4 hours. Second order linear partial 
differential equations and their initial value and boundary value problems. 
Separations of variables and Green's formula considerations. Eigenfunction 
expansions for homogeneous and inhomogeneous heat equation in finite domains. 
Sturm- Liouville problem. Fourier series. Prerequisites: Math. 310 and 321. 

323. Elementary Partial Differential Equations II. 4 hours. The potential equation and 
the wave equation in finite domains. Semi-infinite domains. Fourier integrals. 
Cylindrical and spherical harmonics. Fourier-Bessel and Legendre-Bessel 
expansions. Prerequisite: Math. 322. 

330. Complex Analysis for Applications I. 4 hours. Credit is not given for both 
Mathematics 330 and 332. Complex numbers and their geometrical represen- 
tation, analytic functions, elementary functions, complex integration, Taylor and 
Laurent series, the calculus of residues, introduction to conformal mapping. 
Prerequisite: Math. 310. 

331. Complex Analysis for Applications II. 4 hours. Branch-point integration, series 
and product expansions, complex integral representations of special functions 
(gamma, hypergeometric, Legendre, Bessel), asymptotic methods, introduction to 
transforms. Prerequisites: Math. 321 and 330. 

332. Complex Variables I. 4 hours. Credit is not given for both Mathematics 332 and 
330. Power series in one variable, holomorphic functions, Cauchy's integral 
theorem, Taylor and Laurent expansions. Prerequisite: Math. 312. 

333. Complex Variables II. 4 hours. Analytic functions of several complex variables, 
harmonic functions, convergence of sequences of holomorphic functions, infinite 
products, normal families, holomorphic transformations, holomorphic systems of 
differential equations. Prerequisite: Math. 332. 

340. Modern Higher Algebra I. 4 hours. Sets and real numbers, groups, rings. 
Prerequisite: Math. 133. 

341. Modern Higher Algebra II. 4 hours. Euclidean and polynomial rings, vector spaces, 
linear transformations, and matrices. Prerequisite: Math. 340. 

342. Modern Higher Algebra III. 4 hours. Dual spaces, inner-product spaces, modules, 
canonical forms of matrices, quadratic forms. Prerequisite: Math. 341. 

343. Formal Logic I. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 343. Propositional logic, logic of 
quantifiers, and identity and completeness. Prerequisite: Consent of the instruc- 
tor; none for mathematics majors. 



MATHEMATICS 117 



344. Formal Logic II. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 344. Continues Mathematics 343. 
Mathematical analysis of decidability and computability. Arithmetization of 
syntax. Imcompleteness and undefinability theorems. Introduction to axiomatic 
set theory. Prerequisite: Math. 343. 

348. Linear Transformations and Matrices. 5 hours. Matrix algebra, determinants, 
inverses of matrices, rank and equivalence, linear independence, vector spaces and 
linear transformation, unitary and orthogonal transformations, characteristic 
equation of a matrix. Prerequisite: Math. 133. 

350. Introduction to Higher Geometry I. 4 hours. Projective properties in the euclidean 
plane, extending the euclidean plane, the projective plane, axioms for the 
projective plane, conies, introduction of coordinates. Prerequisite: Math. 342. 

351. Introduction to Higher Geometry II. 4 hours. Topics in geometry, projective 
planes, higher dimensional projective geometries, model as subspaces of a vector 
space, coordinatization. Prerequisite: Math. 350. 

353. Introduction to Differential Geometry. 4 hours. Curves, surfaces, manifolds 
imbedded in euclidean space, Riemannian geometry, first and second fundamental 
forms of imbedded surfaces. Prerequisite: Math. 312. 

355. Introduction to Topology I. 4 hours. Set theory, topological spaces, metric 
spaces, continuous maps, connectedness, compactness, separation axioms, 
completely separable spaces, mappings into Hilbert spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 
310. 

356. Introduction to Topology II. 4 hours. Locally connected spaces, arcs and arcwise 
connectivity, Cantor sets, Hahn-Mazurkiewicz theorem, elements of homotopy 
theory. Prerequisites: Math. 340 and 355. 

357. Introduction to Topology HI. 4 hours. Vector spaces, poly topes, homology 
theory, Euler-Poincare formula, simplicial mappings, Brouwer degree and Brouwer 
fixed-point theorem. Prerequisite: Math. 356. 

360. Elementary Theory of Numbers I. 4 hours. The basic concepts of the theory of 
numbers: divisibility, prime numbers congruences, quadratic reciprocity law. 
Prerequisite: Math. 133 or approval of the department. 

361. Theory of Numbers II. 4 hours. Functions of number theory, recurrence 
functions, diophantine equations, quadratic forms, Farey sequences and rational 
approximations. Prerequisite: Math. 360. 

362. Theory of Numbers III. 4 hours. Continued fractions, distribution of primes, 
algebraic numbers, polynomials, partitions, density of sequences of integers. 
Prerequisite: Math. 361. 

370. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. 4 hours. Probability models, univariate 
and multivariate distributions, random variables. Prerequisite: Math. 133. 



118 MATHEMATICS 



371. Statistics I. 4 hours. Statistical problems and procedures, estimation, testing 
hypotheses, distribution theory. Prerequisite: Math. 370. 

372. Statistics II. 4 hours. One-sample problems, comparison, linear models, and 
analysis of variance. Prerequisite: Math. 371. 

375. Probability. 4 hours. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, recurrent 
events, random walks, Markov chains. Prerequisite: Math. 370. 

377. Finite Differences I. 4 hours. Difference formulas, finite integration, summation 
of series, Bernoulli and Euler polynomials, interpolation. Prerequisite: Math. 112 
or 133. 

378. Finite Differences II. 4 hours. Approximate integration, beta and gamma 
functions, difference equations. Prerequisite: Math. 377. 

381. Vector and Tensor Analysis I. 4 hours. Algebra of vectors, vector differential 
calculus, differential geometry, Stokes' theorem, divergence theorem, applications 
to electricity, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and elasticity. Prerequisite: Math. 311. 

382. Vector and Tensor Analysis II. 4 hours. Transformation properties, covariant and 
contravariant tensors, differential geometry of curves and surfaces, exterior 
differential calculus with emphasis on aspects of interest in science and 
engineering. Prerequisite: Math. 381. 

385. Laplace Transforms. 3 hours. The Laplace transform and its inverse; properties of 
the transform; linear differential equations (ordinary and partial); linear differ- 
ence equations, gamma, error, and Bessel functions; asymptotic series; nonelemen- 
tary integrals; integral equations, Hankel transforms. Prerequisite: Math. 330. 

387. Numerical Analysis I. 4 hours. Mathematics 387 and 388 together provide a 
comprehensive introduction to linear numerical analysis. Computational methods 
and error analysis for matrix inversion, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and linear 
approximations. Prerequisites: Math. 133; Math. 194 or 195. 

388. Numerical Analysis II. 4 hours. Continues Mathematics 387. Prerequisite: Math. 
387. 

389. Numerical Analysis III. 4 hours. Numerical integration and differentiation. 
Quadrature in n dimensions. Numerical integration of ordinary differential 
equations. Prerequisite: Math. 388. 

391. Boolean Algebra and Switching Theory. 4 hours. Sets, relations, functions, 
equivalence relations, abstract Boolean algebra. Applications of Boolean algebra. 
Minimization of Boolean functions. Representation of finite Boolean algebras. 
Prerequisite: Math. 310 or 340. 

392. Introduction to Automata Theory. 4 hours. Boolean rings and lattices as Boolean 
algebras. Synchronous sequential circuits. Mealy and Moore models of automata. 
Regular sets. Prerequisite: Math. 391. 



MATHEMATICS 119 



Automata and Languages. 4 hours. Types of automata and their events. The 
semigroup of an automaton. Basic decomposition theory. Introduction to formal 
languages. Grammars of types 0, 1, 2, 3. Properties of context-free languages. 
Prerequisite: Math. 392. 

Simulation Languages. 4 hours. Digital simulation of complex systems; general 
purpose and special simulation languages and their useful properties, their design 
and implementation; a comparison and evaluation of special languages, such as 
GPSS II, SIMPSCRIPT, GASP, SIMPAC, DYNAMO, and SIMULATE: application 
of at least one of them in a term project. Prerequisites: Math. 280 and 281 or the 
equivalents. 

List-Processing Languages. 4 hours. List and string-processing languages, such as 
IPLV, SLIP, COMIT, SNOBOL, and LISP, from the user's point of view. 
Applications to nonnumeric problems, such as symbolic formula manipulation, 
information retrieval, and pattern recognition. Prerequisites: Math. 280 and 281 
or the equivalents. 

Design of Compilers. 4 hours. Design and implementation of algebraic compilers 
for a modern digital computer. Prerequisite: Math. 281. 

Computer Operating Systems. 4 hours. Problems of planning and implementing an 
operating system for a modern digital computer so as to utilize its power to the 
fullest possible extent. Prerequisite: Math. 281. 

Special Topics in Mathematics. 1 to 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Course 
content will be announced prior to each quarter in which it is given. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

Honors in Mathematics. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Seminars on special 
topics and advanced problems to permit students majoring in mathematics to do 
independent study under the guidance of senior members of the staff. 
Prerequisites: Math. 312 and 342. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Second Course in Abstract Algebra I. 4 hours. Isomorphism theorems, permuta- 
tion groups, finite groups, Sylow's theorems, structure of finitely generated 
Abelian groups, composition series, solvable groups. Prerequisite: Math. 342 or 
the equivalent. 

402. Second Course in Abstract Algebra II. 4 hours. Field extensions, finite fields, 
Galois theory, Wedderburn's theorem. Prerequisite: Math. 401. 

403. Second Course in Abstract Algebra III. 4 hours. Rings and algebras, structure of 
algebras, multilinear algebra, tensor products. Prerequisite: Math. 402. 

404. Rings and Modules. 4 hours. The category of R-modules, projective and injective 
modules, the Morita theorems, elementary homological algebra, separable algebras, 
homological dimension. Prerequisite: Math. 403. 



120 MATHEMATICS 



405. Finite Groups. 4 hours. Transfer theorems, p-nilpotent groups, Ejf C77, D^ 
properties, solvable groups, Schur-Zassenhaus theorem, additional topics selected 
by the instructor. Prerequisite: Math. 403. 

406. Free Groups and Universal Properties. 4 hours. Universal algebras, words and 
varieties, free algebras, free groups, subgroups of free groups, free products, free 
associative algebras, Birkhoff-Witt theorem, free Lie algebras. Prerequisite: Math. 
403. 

407. Representation Theory. 4 hours. Representation theory of finite-dimensional 
algebras, structure of the regular representation, characters, applications to finite 
groups, theorems of Frobenius and Burnside, character ring, exceptional 
characters. Prerequisite: Math. 403. 

408. Homological Algebra I. 4 hours. Abstract categories and functors, adjoints, 
additive and Abelian categories, functor categories. Prerequisite: Math. 403. 

409. Homological Algebra II. 4 hours. Complexes, homology, projectives and injec- 
tives, connected sequences of functors, satellites, derived functors, ext, tor, the 
full embedding theorem. Prerequisite: Math. 408. 

410. Nonassociative Algebras I. 4 hours. Introduction to nonassoeiative algebras, 
alternative algebras, power associative algebras, Jordan algebras. Prerequisite: 
Math. 403. 

411. Nonassociative Algebras II. 4 hours. Jordan algebras continued, Lie algebras, 
general classification theorems. Prerequisite: Math. 410. 

419. Advanced Topics in Algebra. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Special topics in 
algebra. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

421. Algebraic Topology I. 4 hours. The category of topological spaces and functors, 
homology of complexes, singular homology theory, Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, 
C-W complex, cohomology and cup-products, universal coefficient theorem. 
Kunneth theorem. Prerequisites: Math. 342, and 357 or the equivalent. 

422. Algebraic Topology II. 4 hours. Homotopy groups, Hurewicz theorem, Whitehead 
theorem, fiber spaces, Postnikov sections, obstruction theory, Serre spectral 
sequence, e-theory, applications. Prerequisite: Math. 421. 

423. Algebraic Topology III. 4 hours. Freudenthal suspension theorem, stable 
homotopy theory, cohomology operations, construction and cohomology of 
Eilenberg-MacLane spaces, structure of the Steenrod algebra, Adams spectral 
sequence. Prerequisite: Math. 422. 

429. Advanced Topics in Topology. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Special topics 
in topology. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

430. Real Analysis I. 4 hours. Set theory, well-ordering cardinal and ordinal numbers, 
metric spaces, connectedness, compactness, completeness. Prerequisite: Math. 
312. 



MATHEMATICS 121 



431. Real Analysis II. 4 hours. Riemann-Stieltjes integral and its extension, measures 
and measurable sets, measurable functions, the Lebesque integral. Prerequisite: 
Math. 430. 

432. Real Analysis III. 4 hours. Function spaces, differentiable and nondifferentiable 
functions, absolutely continuous functions. Prerequisite: Math. 431. 

433. Integral Equations. 4 hours. Fredholm and Hilbert-Schmidt theory and applica- 
tions, symmetric kernels and orthogonal systems of functions, some types of 
singular and nonlinear integral equations. Prerequisite: Math. 312. 

434. Transform Methods. 4 hours. Mellin and Hankel transforms, multiple Fourier 
transforms; applications to conduction of heat in solids, to slowing down of 
neutrons in matter, and to atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: Math. 312; 
Math. 331 or 333. 

435. Calculus of Variations. 4 hours. Introductory problems; geodesies, the brachisto- 
chrone, minimal surface of revolution. Isoperimetric problems. Geometrical 
optics, Fermat's principle. Dynamics of particles. Minimum characterization of 
the eigenvalue-eigenfunction problem. Ritz's method of approximation. Prereq- 
uisite: Math. 312. 

436. Functional Analysis I. 4 hours. Topological vector spaces, Banach spaces, Hilbert 
spaces, Hahn-Banach theorem, interior mapping principle, uniform boundedness 
principle, applications, approximation and closure theorems. Prerequisite: Math. 
432. 

437. Functional Analysis IL 4 hours. Linear operators on a Banach space, the spectrum 
and resolvent of a linear operator, compact operators, spectral theorem for 
compact Hermitian operators on a Hilbert space, integral equations, Sturm- 
Liouville theory. Prerequisite: Math. 436. 

438. Functional Analysis III. 4 hours. Spectral theorem for normal operators on a 
Hilbert space, unbounded operators, semigroups of linear operators, ergodic 
theorems. HP spaces of analytic functions, Beurling's theorem on the shift 
operator, applications. Prerequisite: Math. 437. 

440. Partial Differential Equations I. 4 hours. Classification of equations and 
characteristics. The Cauchy-Kowalewski theorem. The Cauchy problem for 
hyperbolic systems in the plane and space of higher dimension. Uniqueness 
theorems for the Cauchy problem. Prerequisites: Math. 323, 331 or 333, and 342 
or 348. 

441. Partial Differential Equations II. 4 hours. Elliptic equations; method of balayage; 
Dirichlet's principle; fundamental solutions; potential theory; eigenvalue prob- 
lems. Prerequisite: Math. 440. 

442. Partial Differential Equations III. 4 hours. Partial differential equations of 
parabolic type. Distributions and weak solutions of partial differential equations. 
Elliptic boundary value problems. Prerequisites: Math. 436, 441. 



122 MATHEMATICS 



449. Advanced Topics in Analysis. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Special topics. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

450. Projective Geometry I. 4 hours. Coordinatization, collineation groups, Desargues' 
condition, weakened forms of Desargues' condition and corresponding coordinate 
systems, fundamental theorem of projective geometry. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 

451. Projective Geometry II. 4 hours. Finite planes, free planes, collineations of 
division ring planes and of free planes, the Lenz-Barlotti classification. Prereq- 
uisite: Math. 450. 

452. Differential Geometry I. 4 hours. Manifolds, tensor fields, the tensor algebra, the 
Grassman algebra, exterior differentiation, mappings, transformations of vector 
fields and differential forms, affine connections, parallelism, the exponential 
mappings, covariant differentiation. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

453. Differential Geometry II. 4 hours. The Riemannian connection, complete 
Riemannian manifolds, isometrics, curvature, Lie groups. Prerequisite: Math. 452. 

454. Structure of Differentiable Manifolds I. 4 hours. Tangent bundle, vector fields, 
tensors, differentiable mappings, geodesies, exponential mapping, Whitney 
embedding theorem, Morse theory. Prerequisites: Credit or registration in Math. 
421 and 430. 

455. Structure of Differentiable Manifolds II. 4 hours. De Rham theorem, duality, 
vector bundles, characteristic classes, Hirzebruch index theorem, almost complete 
structures, Milnor spheres. Prerequisite: Math. 454. 

456. Structure of Differentiable Manifolds III. 4 hours. Poincare conjecture, structures 
on manifolds, cobordism theorem, embeddings and immersions, Atiyah-Singer 
index theorem, Lie groups and Lie algebras, Bott periodicity theorem. Prereq- 
uisite: Math. 455. 

459. Advanced Topics in Geometry. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Special 
topics. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

460. Recursion Theory I. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 460. Introduction to the theory 
of recursive functions, Turing machines, and effective computability. Godel's 
incompleteness theorem. Prerequisite: Math. 344. 

461. Recursion Theory II. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 461. Classification of 
recursively enumerable sets, Post's problem, degrees of unsolvability, the 
arithmetical hierarchy. Prerequisite: Math. 460. 

462. Metamathematics I. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 462. Classical first order logic, 
axiomatic theories, model theory. Prerequisite: Math. 344. 

463. Metamathematics II. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 463. Incompleteness, 
undecidability, nondefinability. Prerequisite: Math. 462. 



MATHEMATICS 123 



464. Metamathematics III. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 464. Higher order logic, 
infinitary logic, proof theory. Prerequisite: Math. 463. 

465. Advanced Set Theory I. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 465. Axiomatic set theory, 
consistency of the continuum hypothesis, and the axiom of choice. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

466. Advanced Set Theory II. 4 hours. Same as Philosophy 466. Strong infinity 
axioms. Independence of the continuum hypothesis and the axiom of choice from 
Zermelo-Fraenkers axioms. Prerequisite: Math. 465. 

469. Advanced Topics in Mathematical Logic. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Same as Philosophy 469. Special topics. Prerequisite: Math. 344. 

470. Probability Theory I. 4 hours. Measure- the ore tic aspects of probability theory, 
characteristic functions, the inversion theorem, the Levy-Cramer continuity 
theorem, Bochner's theorem, Cramer's theorem and the Herglotz lemma, types of 
convergence, the Borel-Cantelli lemma, the zero-one law, the law of large 
numbers, central limit theorems of Lindeberg, Liapunov, and Lindeberg- Feller. 
Prerequisite: Math. 432. 

471. Probability Theory II. 4 hours. The central limit problem, conditional probability, 
martingales, random walk and recurrent events, Markov processes with discrete 
and continuous parameters, general introduction to processes with independent 
increments and orthogonal increments, stationary processes, least square 
prediction. Prerequisite: Math. 470. 

480. Scattering Theory I. 4 hours. Solutions of the reduced wave equations for 
scattering of scalar, vector, and dyadic waves; separable and nonseparable 
problems. Representations: Green's function integrals, complex integrals, inverse 
distance series, special function series; approximations; geometrical optics and 
potential theory; applications. Prerequisites: Math. 323, 331, and Phys. 371. 

481. Scattering Theory II. 4 hours. Representations, theorems, and approximations for 
many-body problems. Multiple scattering solutions as functional of single-body 
functions: integral equations, algebraic equations, series representations, opera- 
tional closed forms, asymptotic forms. Two-scatterer problems, arbitrary 
configurations, and periodic sprays. Prerequisite: Math. 480. 

482. Scattering Theory III. 4 hours. Statistical scattering problems. Scattering by 
randomly moving distributions. Models for scattering by rough surfaces, gases, 
and liquids. Relations between scatterer statistics and signal statistics for 
low-speed distributions. Relativistic scattering problems. Prerequisite: Math. 481. 

484. Mathematical Techniques of Nuclear Reactor Theory I. 4 hours. Same as Energy 
Engineering 484. Introduction to nuclear physics and nuclear reactor physics; flux 
distributions, critical mass, slowing down kernels and their Fourier transforms, 
two-group steady state theory in the reflected reactor, buckling iteration method, 
matrix methods in boundary value and criticality problems in the one-dimensional 



124 MATHEMATICS 



multiregion reactor, series solutions of group diffusion equations in multiregion 
reactor and in two-dimensional fully reflected reactor, reactor criticality codes. 
Prerequisites: Math. 312, 323, 341 or 348, and 381, or the equivalents. 

485. Mathematical Techniques of Nuclear Reactor Theory II. 4 hours. Same as Energy 
Engineering 485. Variational methods in the criticality problem, theory of control 
rods in cylindrical reactor, introduction to reactor kinetics, perturbation theory 
and applications, adjoint flux distributions, inhour equation for multiregion 
multifuel reactors, xenon poisoning and override problem. Prerequisite: Math. 
484. 

486. Mathematical Techniques of Nuclear Reactor Theory III. 4 hours. Same as Energy 
Engineering 486. Cylindrical reactor with source, power level determination 
problem, time-dependent flux distributions in multiregion reactor, one-group 
model, transient and stable flux distributions in multiregion reactor, two-group 
model, self-limiting power bursts, analysis of nonlinear feedback problems. 
Prerequisite: Math. 485. 

489. Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Special topics in applied mathematics. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

490. Computer Programming for Students in Behavioral Sciences. hours. Seven-week 
introduction to Fortran IV. Examples from statistics, business, and the behavioral 
sciences. The Computer Center cooperates with departments imposing a language 
requirement in programming in setting examinations for this course. 

491. Computer Programming for Students in the Physical Sciences. hours. Seven- 
week introduction to Fortran IV. Examples from mathematics, engineering, and 
the natural sciences. The Computer Center cooperates with departments imposing 
a language requirement in programming in setting examinations for this course. 

492. Numerical Methods in Partial Differential Equations I. 4 hours. Classification of 
equations and boundary value problems; finite difference analogues for parabolic, 
hyperbolic, and elliptic equations; explicit and implicit methods of parabolic and 
hyperparabolic systems; the method of characteristics for hyperbolic equations; 
stability of initial value problems; iterative methods (modern and classical) for 
elliptic equations; discretization and round-off errors. Prerequisites: Math. 323 and 
389 or the equivalents. 

493. Numerical Methods in Partial Differential Equations II. 4 hours. Continues 
Mathematics 492. Prerequisite: Math. 492. 

495. Approximation Theory. 4 hours. General approximation theory in normed linear 
spaces with primary emphasis on functions defined on an interval and periodic 
fuction; existence and uniqueness theorems; characterization of Chebyshev 
approximents; degree of approximation; use of approximations in computing. 
Prerequisites: Math. 312, and 342 or 348, or the equivalents. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval 
of the department. 



PHILOSOPHY 125 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professors: George T. Dickie, Daniel J. Morris, Brian F. Skyrms, William W. 
Tait, Irving Thalberg 

Associate Professors: Sandra L. Bartky, Terence D. Parsons 

Assistant Professors: Daniel P. Berger, David C. Blumenfeld, Marcia Eaton, 
John J. Economos, Neal Grossman, Michael Jubien, Richard Kraut, Ralf 
Meerbote, Kathryn P. Parsons, Paul Teller, Robert Tragesser (Visiting), 
W. Kent Wilson, Jeff ery Zucker (Visiting) 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Arts and the Doctor 
of Philosophy. 



Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a grade-point average of at least 4.000 for the last 
two years of undergraduate work. Students whose average is below 4.000 but 
above 3.750 will be considered on an individual basis. An undergraduate 
major in philosophy is not a requirement for admission. 

Applicants should have taken courses in modern formal logic, ethics, 
history of philosophy, and theory of knowledge or philosophy of science. 
Students admitted with deficiences must take one or more of the following 
courses: Philosophy 301, 302, 304, 306, 321, 330, 332. 



Degree Requirements 



Master of Arts 

A student must choose at least one course in each of the following areas: 
history of philosophy; the theory of knowledge, including logic, philosophy 
of science, and the philosophy of language; and the theory of value, including 
ethics and aesthetics. The department also requires the student to complete a 
unified program of 48 quarter hours of graduate study under the direction of 
an adviser. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

A full program consists of 16 hours of course work each quarter or a total 
of 144 quarter hours for the degree. The student must complete all 
requirements within seven years after entering the program. A student 



126 PHILOSOPHY 



carrying a full program will generally be expected to complete the 
requirements in fewer than five years. Exceptions will be permitted only 
under conditions of unusual hardship. 

Students progress toward the Ph.D. in two stages: 

1. During the second year, they must take the comprehensive written 
examination. This examination consists of four parts: history of 
philosophy; logic, philosophy of language, and philosophy of science; 
metaphysics and epistemology; and value theory. Some options are 
allowed; consult the department on these. 

2. After a student has passed the comprehensive examination and has 
chosen the subject of his dissertation, an appointed doctoral 
committee will administer a preliminary oral examination to 
determine whether his research project is feasible and is sufficiently 
original and serious. The committee may then recommend formal 
advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D., and a member of the 
committee will be named to supervise the writing of the dissertation. 
Upon completion of his dissertation the candidate must defend it in a 
final oral examination. 

In addition to the foregoing, each student must take and pass an 
examination in elementary logic. 

The language requirement for each student will be decided by a 
departmental committee of graduate faculty. The determination will be based 
on a consideration of the area in which the student intends to specialize. In 
no case will proficiency in more than two languages be required. In those 
areas where the primary sources are in English, a foreign language may not be 
required. 

A detailed statement of the special departmental requirements for 
graduate students can be obtained from the Department of Philosophy, 1803 
University Hall. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

300. Philosophy of Space and Time. 4 hours. Geometry and space, contingent and 
necessary properties of space and time, the direction and flow of time, effects 
preceding their causes, Zeno's paradoxes. Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

301. Plato. 4 hours. Selected dialogues. Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

302. Aristotle. 4 hours. Reading and discussion of some of the basic works. 
Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

303. Chinese Philosophy. 4 hours. Development of the major Chinese philosophies. 
Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy. 



PHILOSOPHY 127 



304. Seventeenth Century Rationalism. 4 hours. Selected readings and discussion from 
the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and others. Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

306. British Empiricism. 4 hours. Selected readings from the works of such 
philosophers as Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

308. Kant. 4 hours. Kant's philosophy, with emphasis on the Critique of Pure Reason. 
Prerequisite: Phil. 304 or 306 or 330. 

310. Nineteenth Century and Early Twentieth Century Thought. 4 hours. May be 

repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Studies of selections 
from the writings of Hegel, Schelling, Fichte, Schopenhauer, Marx and Engels, 
J.S. Mill, Nietzsche, McTaggart, Green, Bradley, Peirce, Perry, and others. 
Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

311. Inductive Logic. 4 hours. Traditional and contemporary problems of induction. 
Inductive logic and the theory of probability. Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

312. Recent and Contemporary Philosophy: Analysis and Logical Empiricism. 4 hours. 

Developments in recent philosophy which have their roots in the study of logic 
and language, such as logical atomism, positivism, and analytical philosophy. 
Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

313. The Claims of Science and Religion. 4 hours. Convergence and conflict between 
the results of science and the claims of religion; similiarities and differences 
between their methods of inquiry. Prerequisites: Phil. 214 and one other course in 
philosophy. 

314. Recent and Contemporary Philosophy: Phenomenology and Existential 
Philosophy. 4 hours. Important contributions to the phenomenological move- 
ment. Selected readings from Husserl, Heidegger, Jaspers, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, 
and others. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy. 

321. Introduction to Formal Logic. 4 hours. Not open to students with credit or 
current enrollment in Philosophy 211. Four meetings per week coincide with 
Philosophy 211 (see Undergraduate Catalog for description of Philosophy 211). 
One additional meeting per week is devoted to an introduction to elementary set 
theory plus extra topics related to work in Philosophy 211. 

322. Problems in the Foundations of Logic and Mathematics. 4 hours. Survey of 
selected problems. Prerequisite: Phil. 211 or the equivalent. 

330. Theory of Knowledge. 4 hours. The grounds of belief; the nature of truth; 
evidence and proof; other related epistemological problems. Prerequisites: Phil. 
230 and 298. 

332. Ethics and Value Theory. 4 hours. The nature of moral judgments and moral 
reasoning; ethics as a normative discipline; definitions of "value"; ethical 
judgments as a kind of value judgment. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy, 
one of which must be a 200-level course. 



128 PHILOSOPHY 



334. Aesthetics. 4 hours. The aesthetic object. Form, representation, and meaning in 
art. Art and knowledge. Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

336. Topics in Metaphysics. 4 hours. Systematic analysis of selected metaphysical 
concepts, such as existence, substance and attribute, universals and particulars, 
change, identity, space and time, and the individual. Recent and traditional points 
of view are considered. Prerequisites: Phil. 236 and 298. 

338. Philosophical Analysis of the Concept of Mind. 4 hours. Presuppositions and 
logical interconnections involved in the use of such terms as "mind," "thoughts," 
"action," "intention," and "will." Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

340. Philosophy of Language. 4 hours. Philosophical and logical problems concerned 
with the nature of meaning and the structure of language. Individual conferences 
on assigned papers are required. Prerequisites: Phil. 211, 240, and 298. 

343. Formal Logic I. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 343. Pro positional logic, logic of 
quantifiers, and identity and completeness. Individual conferences on assigned 
papers are required. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor; none for mathematics 
majors. 

344. Formal Logic II. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. 
Same as Mathematics 344. Continues Philosophy 343. Mathematical analysis of 
decidability and computability. Arithmetization of syntax. Incompleteness and 
undefinability theorems. Introduction to axiomatic set theory. Prerequisite: Phil. 
343. 

345. Philosophical Problems of the Sciences. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit with 
the permission of the department. Reading and discussion of selected works on 
the aims and methods of science, the status of scientific theories, natural laws and 
theoretical entities, and the nature of explanation. Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

351. Problems in the Philosophy of Mathematics. 4 hours. Intensive study of a 
particular problem or nexus of problems in the philosophy of mathematics. 
Prerequisite: Phil. 298. 

399. Independent Study. 1 to 8 hours. Independent study, under the supervision of a 
staff member, of a topic not covered in the regular curriculum. The course is 
offered at the request of the student and only at the discretion of the staff 
members concerned. Prerequisite: Approval of the department. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Seminar: Topics in Ancient Philosophy. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit 
with the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently 
when topics vary. Intensive study of selected topics. 

403. Seminar in Medieval Philosophy. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit with 
the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently when 
topics vary. Persistent problems in the philosophy of the Middle Ages. 



PHILOSOPHY 129 



405. Seminar: Topics in Modern Philosophy. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit 
with the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently 
when topics vary. Intensive analysis of the work of one important philospher or 
philosophical movement between 1600 and 1900. 

407. Seminar: Topics in Contemporary Philosophy. 6 hours. May be repeated once for 
credit with the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken 
concurrently when topics vary. Intensive analysis of the work of one important 
philosopher or philosophical movement of the twentieth century. 

411. Seminar in Recent Ethical Theory. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit with 
the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently when 
topics vary. Intensive study of selected topics. 

413. Seminar in Philosophical Topics in Logic. 6 hours. May be repeated once for 
credit with the consent of the instructor. Two sections may be taken concurrently 
when topics vary. 

415. Seminar in Metaphysics. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit with the 
approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently when topics 
vary. Intensive study of selected topics. 

417. Seminar in the Philosophy of Science. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit 
with the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently 
when topics vary. Intensive study of selected topics. 

419. Seminar in the Philosophy of Language. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit 
with the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently 
when topics vary. Intensive study of selected topics. 

421. Seminar in the Theory of Knowledge. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit 
with the approval of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently 
when topics vary. Selected topics in the contemporary theory of knowledge. 

423. Seminar in Aesthetics. 6 hours. May be repeated once for credit with the approval 
of the department. Two sections may be taken concurrently when topics vary. 
Intensive study of selected topics. 

460. Recursion Theory I. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 460. Introduction to the 
theory of recursive functions, Turing machines, and effective computability. 
Godel's incompleteness theorem. Prerequisite: Phil. 344. 

461. Recursion Theory II. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 461. Classification of 
recursively enumerable sets, Post's problem, degrees of unsolvability, the 
arithmetical hierarchy. Prerequisite: Phil. 460. 

462. Metamathematics I. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 462. Classical first order logic, 
axiomatic theories, model theory. Prerequisite: Phil. 344. 

463. Metamathematics II. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 463. Incompleteness, 
undecidability, nondef inability. Prerequisite: Phil. 462. 



130 PHYSICS 



464. Metamathematics III. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 464. Higher order logic, 
infinitary logic, proof theory. Prerequisite: Phil. 463. 

465. Advanced Set Theory I. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 465. Axiomatic set theory, 
consistency of the continuum hypothesis, and the axiom of choice. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

466. Advanced Set Theory II. 4 hours. Same as Mathematics 466. Strong infinity 
axioms. Independence of the continuum hypothesis and the axiom of choice from 
Zermelo-Fraenkel's axioms. Prerequisite: Phil. 465. 

469. Advanced Topics in Mathematical Logic. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Same as Mathematics 469. Special topics. Prerequisite: Phil. 344. 

479. Seminar: Theoretical, Historical, and Philosophical Issues in Psychology. 2 hours. 

Same as History 479 and Psychology 479. May be repeated. Systematic review of 
special topics; emphasis on current approaches and interpretations. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

483. Independent Study. 2 to 8 hours. Topics and plan of study must be approved by 
the candidate's adviser and by the staff member who directs the work. 

490. Seminar in the Teaching of Philosophy. 1 hour. May be repeated for credit. 
Discussion of problems connected with the teaching of introductory courses in 
philosophy. Required of all graduate students in philosophy unless excused by the 
department. All teaching assistants will be required to enroll during the tenure of 
their assistantships. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. 



PHYSICS 

Professors: Swaminatha Sundaram, Head of the Department; Seymour 
Bernstein, Arnold R. Bodmer, James W. Garland, James S. Kouvel, Edward B. 
McNeil, R. Curtis Retherford, Herman B. Weissman, Lester Winsberg 

Associate Professors: Stanley Aks, Richard A. Carhart, Alan S. Edelstein, 
Howard S. Goldberg, Gloria A. Hoff, Stephen J. Kreiger, Seymour Margulies, 
William J. Otting, Antonio Pagnamenta, John N. Pappademos, David S. 
Schreiber, Ram R. Sharma, Julius Solomon, David J. Vezzetti 

Assistant Professors: Larry L. Abels, Robert J. Abrams, Helmut Claus, 
Jerome E. Jackson (Visiting), Jack A. Kaeck, Arthur L. Licht, Donald W. 
McLeod, James G. Ring (Visiting), Josip Z. Soln (Visiting), Norman D. 
Strahm (Visiting), Ben Varga 



PHYSICS 131 

The department offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science 
and the Doctor of Philosophy with the following areas of specialization: 

Atomic and Molecular Physics— oscillator strengths, vibrational and 
rotational spectra, high temperature properties, lasers, vacuum UV. 

High Energy Physics- R° decays, CP violation, scattering, weak and 
strong interactions, resonances, symmetries, field theory, Regge poles. 

Nuclear Physics— nuclear structure, hypernuclei, nuclear potentials, 
deformed nuclei; 

Solid State Physics— magnetic resonance and static suceptibility, specific 
heat, electron tunneling and transport properties of metals, superconductors, 
and insulators; studies at ultra-low temperatures; optical and dielectric 
properties. 

Theoretical Physics— atomic-molecular energies; superconductivity, disper- 
sion relations, lattice properties, electronphonon interactions, crystal fields, 
quantum hydrodynamics; nuclear structure and hypernuclei; field theory, 
particle interactions, resonances and scattering; statistical mechanics. 



Degree Requirements 



Master of Science 

Satisfactory completion of 48 quarter hours of course work is required 
with at least 24 hours in physics, including Physics 401, 402, 411, 412, and 
441 or equivalent courses. It is strongly recommended that Physics 403, 413, 
and 461 be included. A thesis is optional. If it is elected, a maximum of 12 
quarter hours may be allowed as a combined total for Physics 497, 
Independent Study and Physics 499, Thesis Research; if a thesis is not 
elected, a maximum of 8 quarter hours may be allowed for Physics 497. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

The minimum requirements for the Ph.D. in physics are: satisfactory 
completion of at least 144 quarter hours of approved course work beyond the 
bachelor's degree, including those eight courses required or recommended for 
the M.S.; passing a written and oral qualifying examination covering 
mechanics, electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, statistical physics and 
elementary modern physics at the level of advanced undergraduate courses, 
the graduate courses required for the M.S. and Physics 461; passing a 
preliminary examination after the completion of all course work; and passing 
a final oral examination on a thesis acceptable to the examining committee. A 
maximum of 48 quarter hours are allowed for Physics 499; a combined 
maximum of 64 quarter hours may be allowed for Physics 497 and Physics 
499. There is no foreign language proficiency requirement. 



132 PHYSICS 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Electricity and Magnetism I. 4 hours. Credit is not given to graduate physics 
majors. Vector calculus; electrostatic potential and fields in vacuum and material 
media; energy concepts; boundary value problems. Prerequisites: Phys. 114 and 
Math. 321. 

302. Electricity and Magnetism II. 4 hours. Credit is not given to graduate physics 
majors. Magnetostatics; vector potential; magnetic materials; time-varying fields 
and electromagnetic induction; Maxwell's equations. Prerequisite: Phys. 301. 

303. Electricity and Magnetism III. 4 hours. Propagation of electromagnetic waves; 
reflection, refraction, and dispersion; guided waves; radiation; selected topics. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 302. 

304. Electronics I. 4 hours. Theory of electronic devices, linear and nonlinear analysis, 
applications of vacuum and semiconductor devices to circuits, amplifiers, biasing, 
feedback, oscillators, and special circuits. Prerequisite: Phys. 301. Physics 302 and 
303 are recommended. 

305. Electronics II. 4 hours. Pulse-shaping networks, logic circuits, control circuits, 
distributed amplifiers, special problems of transducers, special signal-to-noise 
techniques. Prerequisite: Phys. 304. 

321. Quantum Mechanics I. 4 hours. The basic theory of the mechanics governing 
microscopic systems. Wave functions; probability density; operators; the 
Schrodinger equation with examples in one and three dimensions- Prerequisites: 
Phys. 114, 221 or approval of the department, and Math. 220. Credit or 
registration in Mathematics 310 is recommended. 

322. Quantum Mechanics II. 4 hours. Mathematical structure of quantum mechanics; 
observables for a quantum state; angular momentum; perturbation theory; the 
Born approximation; the variational method; transition probabilities. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 321. Credit or registration in Mathematics 31 1 is recommended. 



323. Elementary Solid State Physics. 4 hours. Crystal structure, thermal and dielectric 
properties of solids, free electron model of metals, band theory, semiconductor 
physics, dislocations and strength of solids. Individual projects are required. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 322. 

331. Nuclear Physics. 4 hours. Natural and artificial radioactivity, equipment for 
studying and producing high-energy particles, nuclear disintegrations, interaction 
of nuclear particles with each other and with matter, cosmic rays, mesons, recent 
developments in high-energy physics. Individual projects are required. Prereq- 
uisite: Phys. 321. 

341. Theoretical Mechanics I. 4 hours. Credit is not given to graduate physics majors. 
Motion of a particle in one, two, and three dimensions, Kepler's laws and 
planetary motion, scattering of particles, conversion between laboratory and 



PHYSICS 133 



center of mass coordinate systems, conservation laws, motion of a rigid body in 
two dimensions. Individual projects are required. Prerequisites: Phys. 114 or 
approval of the department; Math. 220. 

342. Theoretical Mechanics II. 4 hours. Statics of extended systems, moving coordinate 
frames, fictitious forces and conservation laws, special theory of relativity, 
mechanics of continuous media. Individual projects are required. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 341. 

343. Theoretical Mechanics III. 4 hours. Rigid-body motion in three dimensions, 
motion in gravitational fields, generalized coordinates and Lagrange and Hamilton 
equations, equations of constraint, small-vibration theory. Individual projects are 
required. Prerequisite: Phys. 342. 

361. Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Thermodynamic variables, equilibrium, zeroth law of 
thermodynamics, isolated systems, the first law, Kelvin and Clausius statements of 
second law, Clausius inequality, irreversible processes, thermodynamic potentials, 
Maxwell relations, stability criteria, equations of state, Clausius-Clapeyron 
equation, multicomponent systems, the third law, selected applications to 
physical systems. Prerequisite: Phys. 114. 

362. Statistical Physics. 4 hours. Kinetic theory of dilute gases, elementary statistical 
concepts, equilibrium between interacting systems; temperature, entropy, statis- 
tical calculation of thermodynamic quantities, the microcanonical and canonical 
ensembles, quantum statistics of ideal gases, selected applications to physical 
systems. Prerequisite: Phys. 361. 

371. Light (Wave Optics). 4 hours, lectures and laboratory; 2 hours, lectures only. 

Wave propagation and Maxwell's equations, interference and interferometers, 
gratings, circular aperture, echelon, resolving power. Prerequisite: Phys. 114 and 
credit or registration in Math. 220. 

372. Light (Modern Optics) I. 4 hours, lecture and laboratory; 2 hours, lecture only. 

Crystals, polarized light, optics of metals, quantum theory of radiation, transition 
probability and oscillator strength, dispersion and scattering theory. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 371. 

373. Light (Modern Optics) II. 4 hours. Individual projects are required. Gaussian 
optics and general laws, special optical systems and applications. Image formation, 
finite image-error theory, spot diagrams. Necessary mathematical tools for Fourier 
analysis and transfer functions. Prerequisite: Phys. 372. 

381. Modern Experimental Physics I. 4 hours, lecture and laboratory; 1 hour, lecture 
only. Techniques and experiments in the physics of atoms, atomic nuclei, 
molecules, the solid state, and other areas of modern physical research. 
Prerequisites: Phys. 304 and 331. 

382. Modern Experimental Physics II. 4 hours. Continues Physics 381. Lecture and 
laboratory. Prerequisite: Phys. 381. 



134 PHYSICS 



Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Electrodynamics I. 4 hours. Maxwell's equations; static and time-dependent fields; 
boundary value problems; wave propagation. Prerequisite: Phys. 303 or approval 
of the department. 

402. Electrodynamics II. 4 hours. Classical theory of radiation; radiation reaction; 
special relativity; covariant formulation of electrodynamics. Prerequisite: Phys. 
401 or approval of the department. 

403. Electrodynamics III. 4 hours. Lagrangian formulation of electrodynamics; action 
principles; special topics in electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite: Phys. 402 or 
approval of the department. 

411. Quantum Mechanics I. 4 hours. Wave functions, uncertainty principle and 
Schrodinger equation, one and three-dimensional one-particle problems, 
approximate methods. Prerequisite: Phys. 322 or approval of the department. 

412. Quantum Mechanics II. 4 hours. Operators and Hilbert space formulation, 
symmetries and conservation laws, angular momentum and rotations, coupling of 
angular momenta, spherical tensors, scattering, phase shifts, Born series, scattering 
in Coulomb field, inelastic scattering. Prerequisite: Phys. 411 or approval of the 
department. 

413. Quantum Mechanics III. 4 hours. Introduction to formal theory of scattering, 
S-matrix, time-dependent and independent formulations of scattering, intro- 
duction to relativistic quantum mechanics, Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, 
introduction to quantum field theory, electromagnetic transitions, particles and 
antiparticles. Prerequisite: Phys. 412 or approval of the department. 

414. Advanced Quantum Mechanics I. 4 hours. Canonical quantum field theory, 
quantization of the electromagnetic field, the Dirac field, the scalar and 
pseudoscalar meson fields, the interactions of quantum fields with classical fields. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 413 or approval of the department. 

415. Advanced Quantum Mechanics II. 4 hours. Interacting quantum fields, the 
S-matrix, the Dyson expansion and diagrams, applications to problems in 
quantum electrodynamics, renormalization and its physical interpretation. Prereq- 
uisite: Phys. 414 or approval of the department. 

421. Atomic and Molecular Physics I. 4 hours. Hydrogen atom and one-electron 
systems, helium atom, self-consistent field theory, alkali spectra, vector model, 
Zeeman and Stark effects, fine and hyperfine structure, collisions, ionization. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 322 or approval of the department. 

422. Atomic and Molecular Physics II. 4 hours. Rotation and vibrational energies of 
diatomic molecules, potential curves, electronic transitions and transition 
moments, intensities, thermodynamic properties, applications. Prerequisite: Phys. 
322 or approval of the department. 



PHYSICS 135 



423. Atomic and Molecular Physics III. 4 hours. Structure and symmetry of molecules, 
vibrational and rotational spectra, experimental infrared and Raman spectra, 
chemical bonding, molecular interactions, molecular collisions, intermolecular 
potentials, relaxation phenomena. Prerequisite: Phys. 322 or approval of the 
department. 

425. Solid State Physics I. 4 hours. Crystal structure, X-ray methods, crystal forces, 
lattice theory, vibrations, heat conductivity. Prerequisite: Phys. 323 or approval 
of the department. 

426. Solid State Physics II. 4 hours. Electric and magnetic properties of solids, 
free-electron model of metals, quantum statistics, band theory, order-disorder 
theory. Prerequisite: Phys. 425 or approval of the department. 

427. Solid State Physics III. 4 hours. Semiconductors, ferro magnetism and antiferro- 
magnetism, superconductivity, lattice vacancies, color centers, excitons, 
luminescence. Prerequisite: Phys. 426 or approval of the department. 

428. Quantum Theory of Solids I. 4 hours. Introduction to quantum mechanics of 
noninteracting particles in a periodic potential, band structure of solids, optical 
properties of solids, dynamics of electrons in a magnetic field and a crystal 
potential. Prerequisites: Phys. 412, 427, and 461, or approval of the department, 

429. Quantum Theory of Solids II. 4 hours. The electron-phonon interaction, 
collective excitations in solids, phonons, plasmons, polarons, magnons, excitons, 
quasiparticles, Landau theory of the Fermi liquid, the Hartree-Foch, RPA, and 
SCF approximations, generalized susceptibility, introduction to Green's func- 
tions, and diagrammatic techniques in solids. Prerequisite: Phys. 428 or approval 
of the department. 

430. Quantum Theory of Solids III. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit by 
arrangement with the department. Topics will vary from year to year. Special 
topics in the modern theory of solids, superconductivity, ferro magnet ism, liquid 
helium, theory of alloys, theory of liquids, theory of defects in semiconductors, 
applications of group theory to solid state physics, etc. Prerequisite: Phys. 429 or 
approval of the department. 

431. Elementary Particle and Nuclear Physics I. 4 hours. Two-nucleon system: 
properties of the deuteron, nucleon-nucleon scattering, nuclear forces. Properties 
of pions and pion-nucleon scattering, other nonstrange mesons; introduction to 
strange particles and higher symmetries. Prerequisite: Phys. 412 or approval of the 
department. 

432. Elementary Particle and Nuclear Physics II. 4 hours. General properties of nuclei: 
sizes, binding energies, stability, saturation. Introduction to nuclear models and 
structure. Beta decay and weak interactions. Prerequisite: Phys. 431 or approval 
of the department. 

433. Nuclear Physics I. 4 hours. Review of two-nucleon system and nuclear forces, 
nuclear models and nuclear spectroscopy. Individual-particle model, collective 
model, particle-hole excitations, pairing, electromagnetic interactions. Prereq- 
uisites: Phys. 413 and 432, or approval of the department. 



136 PHYSICS 



434. Nuclear Physics II. 4 hours. Nuclear reactions: compound nucleus, optical model, 
direct reactions. Nuclear forces and nuclear structure; light nuclei, nuclear 
many-body problem; nucleon- nucleus scattering at high energies. Interactions of 
particles other than nucleons with nuclei. Prerequisite: Phys. 433 or approval of 
the department. 

435. Elementary Particle Physics I. 4 hours. Fields and invariance principles, relativistic 
kinematics and scattering, strong and electromagnetic interactions of nonstrange 
particles. Pions and nucleons, resonances, introduction to dispersion relations, 
one-particle exchanges, electromagnetic form factors. Prerequisites: Phys. 413 and 
432, or approval of the department. 

436. Elementary Particles II. 4 hours. Strong interactions of strange particles; higher 
symmetries; weak interactions of nonstrange and of strange particles. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 435 or approval of the department. 

441. Classical Mechanics. 4 hours. Variational principles; Lagrange and Hamilton 
equations; Hamilton-Jacobi theory; rigid body motion; small oscillations; 
continuous systems and fields. Prerequisite: Phys. 343 or approval of the 
department. 

445. Introduction to General Relativity. 4 hours. Deficiencies of Newtonian gravita- 
tional theory, principle of equivalence, the metric field and geodesies, tensor 
analysis and differential geometry, Einstein's equations and the action principle, 
the energy-momentum pseudotensor, gravitational fields and waves. Prerequisites: 
Phys. 402 and 441 or approval of the department. 

461. Statistical Mechanics. 4 hours. Classical and quantum-statistical mechanics; 
Maxwell, Bose, and Fermi statistics; ensemble theory; imperfect gas; selected 
applications. Prerequisite: Phys. 361 or approval of the department. 

481. Mathematical Methods of Physics I. 4 hours. Introduction to the linear methods 
of mathematical physics from the modern point of view. Mathematical founda- 
tions of quantum theory; classical problems of differential equations. Prereq- 
uisite: Approval of the department. 

482. Mathematical Methods of Physics II. 4 hours. Applications of linear analysis to 
ordinary and partial differential equations and integral equations. Properties of 
classical special functions and generalized functions. Prerequisite: Phys. 481 or 
approval of the department. 

491. Graduate Seminar. 1 to 2 hours. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Seminars 
are organized in areas of research activity within the department and cover recent 
contributions to the literature and research in progress. Students, faculty, and 
scientists from other institutions make presentations. Prerequisites: Phys. 411 and 
412. 

497. Individual Study. 2 to 4 hours. Special topics. Outside reading and term paper will 
be assigned by special arrangement with the department and faculty. Prerequisite: 
Approval of the department. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 137 



498. Special Topics in Modern Physics. 1 to 4 hours. Students may enroll in more than 
one section of this course concurrently. Lectures on topics of current interest. 
Subjects are announced. Prerequisites: Phys. 411 and 412. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval 
of the department. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors: Richard M. Johnson, Head of the Department; Hollis W. Barber, 
Twiley W. Barker, Doris A. Graber, Boyd R. Keenan, Milton Rakove 

Associate Professors: George D. Beam, Leonard E. Goodall, Lyman A. 
Kellstedt, Byung C. Koh, David C. Leege, Frank Tachau 

Assistant Professors: Catherine M. Kelleher, Peter R. Knauss, Michael A. 
Murray, Dick W. Simpson 

An applicant usually must present a bachelor's degree with a major in 
political science or a bachelor's degree with a minimum of 20 quarter hours in 
political science, or petition the department to be admitted. 

Applications for entrance with advanced graduate standing will be 
considered on the basis of individual preparation and merit. 

All applicants are required to take the Aptitude Test and the Advanced 
Political Science Test of the Graduate Record Examination. Information 
about this examination can be obtained from the head of the Department of 
Political Science. Performance on this examination, undergraduate academic 
record, and letters of recommendation from former teachers are the three 
principal kinds of evidence considered in making decisions about admission 
and in the awarding of assistantships. It is particularly advantageous, 
therefore, for the prospective applicant to take this examination in the fall of 
his senior year. 



Degree Requirements 

The department offers courses leading to the Master of Arts. The 
minimum requirements for the M.A. are: 

48 quarter hours beyond the bachelor's degree for students electing the 
non-thesis option and 40 hours for students who elect to write a thesis. 

Usually, at least two courses outside the department. 
Political Science 390, Scope and Methods of Political Science, or the 
equivalent. 

A reading knowledge of French, German, Russian, or Spanish or 
demonstrated competence in statistics or another acceptable research 
tool. 



138 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Three quarters of residence, not necessarily consecutive, with 24 quarter 
hours taken in residence. 

For those selecting the non-thesis option: 

48 quarter hours of course work, which include at least 24 quarter hours 

of 400-level courses. 

For those selecting the thesis option, a thesis for which 12 quarter hours 
of thesis research credit is awarded, and an oral examination on the thesis 
upon its completion. 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Educational Policy in Urban America. 4 hours. Same as Education 301. 
Examination of selected urban phenomena in relation to educational bureau- 
cracies and school socialization processes. Emphasis on historical investigation of 
strategies for protest and change employed by ghetto populations; conditions 
which fostered these strategies; responses of schools and other target institutions; 
social- philosophical analysis of ideologies supporting both protest and response. 
Prerequisites: One course in the social foundations of education or the equivalent 
and consent of the instructor. 

305. Local Political Decision Making. 4 hours. A research seminar. The problem of 
identifying and investigating political decisions in a major urban area like Chicago; 
an attempt is made to apply different theories of decision making to local politics. 
Prerequisites: PolS. 120 or 150 and consent of the instructor. 

306. Ghetto Politics. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. 
Analysis of the political impact of the ghetto on local, state, and national political 
systems; the impotency of the ghetto voter; the ghetto politician; ghetto riots as 
political protest; the ghetto and presidential politics. Prerequisite: Three courses 
in political science, American history, or sociology. 

307. Urban Politics Seminar. 4 hours. Analysis of the structure and dynamics of 
political parties and organizations in urban areas. Intensive study of the power 
structure, strength, and weakness of the Democratic and Republican parties in 
urban areas, using Chicago and its suburbs as a laboratory. Prerequisites: PolS. 
205 and consent of the instructor. 

311. Studies in Urban Public Policies. 4 hours. The problems of governing metropolitan 
areas; special emphasis on evolving patterns of cooperation among governments in 
metropolitan areas, such as metropolitan federalism, city-county consolidation, 
councils of governments, and regional planning commissions. Prerequisite: PolS. 
120 or 205. 

315. Legislatures and Legislation. 4 hours. The legislative function in government; 
structure and organization of American legislatures, national, state, and local; 
party organization in legislatures; legislative procedure; pressure groups and 
lobbying; relation of legislature to other branches of government; problems of 
legislative reorganization. Prerequisite: PolS. 120 or 150. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 139 



The President and Congress. 4 hours. Analysis of the relationship of the President 
and Congress; problems involved in the formulation and execution of public 
policy. Prerequisite: PolS. 120 or 150. 

Intergovernmental Relations. 4 hours. The origin and evolution of the American 
federal system; federal-state constitutional relationships; intergovernmental fiscal 
relations; the political cultures; interstate relations; regionalism; state-local 
relations, interlocal relations and cooperative federalism in functional areas. 
Prerequisites: PolS. 151; 205 or 212. 

Science, Technology, and Public Policy. 4 hours. The impact of science and 
technology on government policy in the United States. Responses of the national 
executive and legislative branches of government; intergovernmental aspects of 
technological advances. Prerequisites: PolS. 151 and one advanced political 
science course. 

The Public Administration of Science and Technology. 4 hours. The response of 
public systems to the scientific and technological revolution; the governmental 
institutions being devised to administer science and technology in the public 
sector. Emphasis on technological problems caused by the emergence of new 
metropolitan communities. 

Public Opinion and Political Communication. 4 hours. The nature of public 
opinion and political communication systems; patterns of opinion distribution 
and techniques for opinion measurement; forces shaping public opinion, with 
emphasis on the mass media; the impact of public opinion on public policy; 
comparison of political communication patterns in the United States with less 
developed and totalitarian nations. Prerequisite: 6 hours of advanced political 
science, sociology, or modern history. 

Propaganda and the Language of Politics. 4 hours. The nature of propaganda, 
political symbols, and the language of politics; the uses of political symbols and 
propaganda in the political processes of democratic and totalitarian societies; 
international propaganda and psychological warfare; methods and uses of 
propaganda analysis. Prerequisite: Two courses in advanced political science, 
sociology, or modern history. 

Electoral Behavior. 4 hours. Emphasizes two aspects of the study of electoral 
behavior: social, economic, and psychological theories developed specifically for, 
or adaptable to, the explanation of electoral behavior; introduction to inductive 
studies of voting behavior. Prerequisite: PolS. 230. 

Quantitative Study of International Politics. 4 hours. The usefulness of statistical 
reasoning in making inferences about international politics. Political decision 
making, political conflict and cooperation, and political development and change 
in terms of three basic levels of analysis: multinational organization, nations, and 
international relations. Prerequisites: PolS. 184 and consent of the instructor. 



140 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



334. Political Socialization. 4 hours. Introduction to the problems of how people learn 
about the polity; from whom they learn, under what circumstances, and with 
what consequences. Prerequisite: Three courses in political science, including at 
least one dealing with human political behavior. 

335. Quantitative Study of Politics. 4 hours. Introduction to descriptive and inductive 
techniques essential for understanding behavioral political science. Especially 
recommended for students who plan to take advanced courses in political 
behavior and related subjects. Prerequisite: PolS. 390. 

336. Film as a Research Technology in the Social Sciences. 4 hours. The techniques 
and problems of film as a technology for generating, interpreting, and presenting 
data. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

337. The Politics of Alienation. 4 hours. Conceptual, empirical, and normative analysis 
of alienation from polity, society, culture, and self. Focus on the political 
consequences of various forms of alienation, including radicalism, apathy, protest, 
revolution, renewal, and innovation. Empirical research is required. Prerequisite: 
PolS. 230. 

351. Constitutional Law. 4 hours. Constitutional provisions and principles as they have 
developed through Supreme Court interpretation; the amending process; 
federalism; commerce, taxing, and war powers; due process of law; the 
constitutional relations between the three major branches of government. 
Prerequisite: At least one introductory political science course. 

353. Seminar: Problems of Constitutional Law. 4 hours. Supervised individual study of 
selected problems arising in the interpretation of the United States Constitution. 
Prerequisites: PolS. 351 or 355 and consent of the instructor. 

355. The Constitution and Civil Liberties. 4 hours. The nature and constitutional 
positions of freedom of religion, speech, press, and others; varying interpretations 
of these freedoms; difficulties encountered in protecting them; problems of 
discrimination against racial, religious, and other minorities. Prerequisite: PolS. 
151. 

356. Administrative Law. 4 hours. Legal problems arising in the relationships between 
the citizen and the government official; administrative rule making and 
enforcement; judicial review of administrative actions. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 

362. Seminar: Public Administration. 4 hours. Supervised individual study of selected 
problems. Prerequisite: PolS. 261 or 263. 

370. Practicum in Teaching Political Science. 4 hours. Provides seniors and graduate 
students with a limited exposure to teaching political science by leading 
discussion sections of undergraduate courses at the same time that they 
participate in a seminar on the problems and methods of teaching in the field. 
Teaching assistants may not receive credit for this course unless they actually 
teach discussion sections and are enrolled in the seminar. Prerequisites: Senior or 
graduate-student standing, at least a B average in political science courses, and 
consent of the instructor. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 141 



381. Seminar: Political Problems of Developing Societies. 4 hours. Selected aspects of 
the politics of the countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Prerequisite: 
PolS. 280. 

386. Problems in International Organization. 4 hours. May be repeated once for credit. 
Subject matter varies from quarter to quarter, but centers around one group of 
related problems pertaining to the United Nations or other international 
organizations. Prerequisite: Two courses in international politics or international 
organization. Political Science 184 and 286 are recommended. 

388. Seminar: Problems in American Foreign Relations. 4 hours. Supervised individual 
study of selected problems of contemporary United States foreign relations. 
Prerequisite: PolS. 281 or 184. 

390. Scope and Methods of Political Science. 4 hours. Examination of the scope and 
subject matter of political science. Special attention to analytic processes in the 
development of concepts, hypotheses, and theories. Methodologies and modes of 
analysis now in use by political scientists. Prerequisites: PolS. 120 or 151 and one 
200-level course in political science. 

391. Political Power. 4 hours. Examination of the problem of the nature of political 
power. Introduction to some of the major literature of power, and the 
development of the concept of political power as a descriptive category adequate 
to the comparative analysis of broader political phenomena, such as parties, 
official decision- making structures, and movements. Prerequisites: PolS. 120 or 
150 and 4 hours of upper-division political science courses. 

392. Democratic Theory. 4 hours. Democracy as a procedure of government and the 
value commitments associated with this form of government. Special attention is 
given to corporate wealth, special interests, bureaucracy, and the mass media as 
they affect the existence of democratic government. 



395. Political Violence. 4 hours. Seminar. Analysis of the use, or threat, of violence in 
the political process. Attention is focused on domestic forms of violence and 
aggression in various nations viewed cross-culturally. Prerequisites: PolS. 150 or 
151, two 4-hour courses in the social sciences, and consent of the instructor. 

398. The Problem of Justice. 4 hours. Same as Administration of Criminal Justice 398. 
The premodern understanding of justice, Plato's or Aristotles's; the modern 
understanding of justice, such as Hobbes' or Locke's, which is the foundation of 
the modern political regime; Rousseau's seminal political thought on justice, 
which is the basis of a variety of reforms and alternatives offered to Hobbes' 
and/or Locke's political regime. Prerequisite: Two courses in political science 
including PolS. 151. 

399. Seminar in Political Theory. 4 hours. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. 
In-depth analysis and discussion of selected problems or works in political theory. 
Prerequisites: PolS. 290, 291, and 292. 



142 POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Courses for Graduate Students 

408. Government and Politics of Chicago. 4 hours. The political process in Chicago, 
including an analysis of the city government and other governments, such as the 
Park and Sanitary Districts. The role of the political parties, business and civil 
leaders, the press, and other factors involved in the governmental process. 
Prerequisite: PolS. 205. 

409. Suburban Government and Politics. 4 hours. Examination of government and 
politics in suburban America. Particular attention is given to party structure, 
financing of governmental units, and the patterns of political competition in the 
suburbs. Prerequisite: PolS. 205. 

412. Problems in State Government. 4 hours. Case analysis and research in selected 
problems dealing with the structure, functions, and administrative processes of 
American state governments. Prerequisite: PolS. 317 or 362. 

415. Urban Management Processes. 4 hours. The political and administrative aspects of 
managing the urban environment. The course is designed to give the student a 
view of the specific tasks that face urban executives, such as mayors, city 
managers, and department heads. Prerequisite: PolS. 212 or 317. 

417. Seminar in Legislation and Public Policy. 4 hours. Intensive study of the 
institutional and dynamic forces that affect public policy making in the United 
States. Emphasis on the separation of powers and the role of pressure groups, 
public opinion, and organizational bureaucracies as they affect the decision- 
making process. Prerequisite: PolS. 3 1 5 or 3 1 6. 

420. Special Problems in Urban Government. 4 hours. Intensive study of selected 
current problems. Maximum emphasis on providing the student with an 
opportunity to undertake and report on independent research. Prerequisite: PolS. 
205. 

451. Problems in American Constitutional Law. 4 hours. Research in selected problems 
evolving from conflicting interpretations of the United States Constitution. 
Prerequisite: PolS. 351 or 355 or the equivalents. 

461. Special Topics in Public Administration. 4 hours. Analysis of selected problems. 
Topics considered vary from year to year, depending upon the needs and interests 
of the students. Prerequisite: PolS. 261. 

462. Seminar in Administrative Theory and Behavior. 4 hours. Analysis of the theory 
of bureaucratic organization in several substantive areas. The nature and function 
of theory in administrative study; basic concepts, hypotheses, and research 
findings in organizational theory and behavior; leadership theory, decision making; 
organizational authority; patterns of accommodation between the organization 
and its members. Prerequisite: PolS. 261. Political Science 329 is recommended. 

463. Seminar: Comparative and International Administration. 4 hours. Supervised 
individual study of selected problems. Prerequisite: PolS. 363. 



PSYCHOLOGY 143 



465. Seminar in Politics and Administration. 4 hours. The interplay between politics 
and administration. The manner in which politics shape and condition public 
administration and vice versa. Both theoretical materials and empirical case 
studies will be examined. Prerequisite: PolS. 261. 

497. Directed Readings in Political Science. 4 hours. May be repeated for a maximum 
of 8 hours. Intensive readings on a topic not covered in the regular curriculum. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

498. Independent Research in Political Science. 2 to 8 hours. May be repeated for a 
maximum of 8 hours. Research on special problems not included in the regular 
course offerings. The work undertaken for this course may not duplicate that 
being done for Political Science 499. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Open only to degree 
candidates. Individual study and research required of all students pursuing the 
advanced degree in political science under the thesis option. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors: Harry S. Upshaw, Head of the Department; Philip Ash, Rosalind 
D. Cartwright, John D. Davis, Leonard D. Eron, Isadore E. Farber, Susan M. 
Markle, Sheldon Rosenberg 

Associate Professors: Gershon B. Berkson, Roger L. Dominowski, Philip E. 
Freedman, Nan E. McGehee, Gerald Senf, Herbert H. Stenson, Robert S. 
Wyer 

Assistant Professors: Alan Benton, Charles L. Gruder, Ernest W. Kent, 
Leonard P. Kroeker, Leon K. Miller, Rolf Peterson, Alexander J. Rosen, 
Elliot L. Rubin 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Arts and the Doctor 
of Philosophy. 



Admission Requirements 

Minimum departmental requirements are as follows: 

A. A grade-point average of 4.200 (on a 5.000 scale) for both the last two 
years of undergraduate study and for all graduate work. A student whose 
average is between 4.200 and 4.000 may be considered on the basis of 
individual merit. 

B. The equivalent of 24 quarter hours in psychology, including statistics and 
a laboratory course in experimental psychology, one year of college 
mathematics, and one year of laboratory courses in physical and/or biological 



144 PSYCHOLOGY 

sciences. Students with exceptionally high grade-point averages and/or scores 
on the Graduate Record Examination who do not fulfill all course 
requirements may be admitted provisionally, pending satisfactory completion 
of the course requirements without graduate credit. 

C. Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination aptitude tests 
(verbal and quantitative) and the advanced test in psychology. Standards of 
acceptable performance on the advanced test may be modified for under- 
graduate majors in fields other than psychology if they are otherwise 
especially well qualified. 

D. Satisfactory ratings by three faculty members, preferably psychologists, 
who are familiar with the applicant's training and ability. In the case of 
candidates who have been engaged in professional work for some years, 
ratings by supervisors may be substituted. 

Graduate admissions are limited; therefore, it may not be possible to 
accept all applicants who meet the foregoing minimum requirements. 
Preference will be given to candidates particularly well qualified in quantita- 
tive and experimental psychology and in the natural sciences. 

Special consideration is given both in admissions and in planning an 
academic program to students who are judged especially likely to succeed 
although their status on standard admissions criteria is below that which is 
normally acceptable. Minority group members who may have experienced 
educational disadvantage are encouraged to apply under this provision. 

Although applications may be accepted up to the time of the Graduate 
College deadline, students who expect to enter the department's program in 
the fall are advised to complete their applications as early as possible, 
preferably by March 15, and no later than May 1. Completed application 
materials must include applications for admission and for graduate appoint- 
ment, referees' ratings, official transcripts, and GRE scores. 



Degree Requirements 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Arts and the Doctor 
of Philosophy. The faculty of the department is organized into an 
undergraduate division, and nine graduate divisions, corresponding to 
substantive and curricular interests. Six of the divisions correspond to broad, 
substantive areas: cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, learning- 
motivation, methodology and measurement, physiological psychology, and 
social psychology. Three of the divisions correspond to the types of graduate 
curriculum that the department offers: the academic curriculum, the clinical 
curriculum, and the organizational curriculum, under which specialties are 
available in industrial psychology, in institutions of higher education and in 
school psychology. Course requirements have been established for each 
division. Students elect one substantive and one curricular division. Usually, 
this election determines the program of study. 



PSYCHOLOGY 145 



Master of Arts 

A candidate must complete 48 quarter hours of graduate-level course 
work (including research) and present an acceptable thesis. At least 16 
quarter hours must be in one of the six substantive divisions. This program 
will be established by the division. The candidate must also complete 
Psychology 343. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

A candidate must complete 144 quarter hours of graduate-level course 
work (including research). In addition, he must have completed a master's 
thesis or its equivalent and must pass preliminary examinations, demonstrate 
proficiency in special research skills, and present an acceptable dissertation. 
Courses offered in fulfillment of these requirements must include Psychology 
343, 370, 443, 444, and the programs of one of the substantive divisions and 
of one of the three curriculum divisions. The candidate must also complete at 
least two courses in each of two cognate areas, these courses and areas to be 
specified by the substantive division. Basic skill in computer usage is required 
of all candidates. Proficiency in one of the following is also required: a 
foreign language, laboratory instrumentation, or psychometric instrument 
construction. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

310. Advanced Social Psychology. 4 hours. Same as Sociology 315. Critical analysis of 
empirical research on social perception, communication and influence, group 
structure, role analysis, and socialization processes. 

313. Social Judgment. 4 hours. Analysis of the judgment process and its implications 
for social psychological phenomena. 

314. Attitude Change. 4 hours. Critical analysis of selected contemporary theory and 
research on attitude change. Topics include source and message effects, 
determinants of persistence of change and resistance to change. 

315. Cognitive Consistency Processes. 4 hours. Critical analysis of research and theory 
related to the processes of information integration and its implications for 
attitude and opinion change. Emphasis on cognitive consistency formulations and 
their derivatives. 

316. Animal Behavior. 4 hours. Principles and methods in the study of animal 
behavior; review of the social behavior of representative species in various phyla. 
Prerequisites: BioS. 100, 101, 102, and Psch. 143. 

323. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpre- 
tation of studies of physically, intellectually, and emotionally deviant children, 



146 PSYCHOLOGY 



with special reference to their implications for education and behavior modifica- 
tion. Prerequisite: 12 hours of psychology including Psch. 220 or the equivalent. 

330. Organizational Psychology. 4 hours. Same as Management 30. Individual 
psychological and group processes and their interaction with organizational 
structure. Behavioral factors in effective organizational change. 

332. Personnel Psychology. 4 hours. Systematic study of the development and 
utilization of psychological techniques of personnel selection, classification, and 
assessment. 

333. Motivation and Morale in Organizations. 4 hours. Same as Management 333. 
Concepts and methods in the assessment and modification of motivation, 
attitudes, and morale. 

335. Psychology of Industrial Training. 4 hours. Same as Management 335. Psycho- 
logical measurement techniques in assessing training needs and evaluating training 
effectiveness. Application of psychological techniques to the development of 
industrial training programs. 

338. Psychology of Industrial Conflict. 4 hours. Same as Management 338. Behavioral 
analysis of the causes, dimensions, and modes of resolution of industrial conflict; 
special emphasis on labor-management relations. 

343. Advanced Statistics I. 4 hours. Elementary probability theory, empirical and 
theoretical distributions, points and interval estimation, hypotheses testing. 

345. Psychometric Applications. 4 hours. Theory of psychological tests and measure- 
ment applied to problems of ability and personality testing; opinion sampling; 
reliability and validity; prediction and selection processes. 

350. Learning and Conditioning. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpretation of 
experimental studies of basic learning processes in animal and human subjects. 

351. Programmed Learning. 4 hours. Theory and research in the techniques, 
applications, and results of programmed instruction. 

352. Motivation. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpretation of experimental studies 
of basic motivational processes in animal and human subjects. 

353. Operant Conditioning. 4 hours. Survey of basic principles and current research in 
the area of operant behavior. 

354. The Psychology of Language. 4 hours. Same as Linguistics 354 and Speech and 
Theater 354. Introductory survey of methods, theory, and research; acquaints 
students with the history and present status of psychology's interest in language 
behavior. 

355. Higher Processes. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpretations of experimental 
studies of language behavior, problem solving, concept formation, and creativity. 



PSYCHOLOGY 147 



356. Sensory and Perceptual Processes I. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpretation 
of experimental studies dealing with the determination of psycho-physical 
functions. Primary emphasis on the perception of single discrete stimuli and 
attributes of stimuli. 

357. Sensory and Perceptual Processes II. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpretation 
of experimental studies dealing primarily with the role of contextual and 
experimental factors in perception. 

360. Human Factors. 4 hours. Application of experimentally derived principles of 
behavior to the design of equipment for efficient use and operation. Sensory and 
perceptual processes, motor skills, and experimental methodology. 

361. Instrumentation in Psychology. 4 hours. Use of transducers, programming 
equipment, and recording systems in psychological research. 

362. Physiological Psychology. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpretation of 
experimental studies of physiological and neurochemical correlates of learning, 
motivation, and perception. Laboratory demonstrations and problems. 

363. Behavioral Pharmacology. 4 hours. Methods, results, and interpretation of 
experimental studies dealing with drugs and behavior. Emphasis on elucidating the 
role of drugs as tools in behavioral research and on the use of experimental 
psychology techniques to explicate drug action. 

370. Systems and Theories. 4 hours. Critical introductory analysis of major historical 
systems and their representation in current theoretical issues. 

382. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 4 hours. Systematic analysis of the nature of 
psychological tests and their application; introduction to intelligence, achieve- 
ment, personality, and interest tests. Practice in administration and interpretation. 

399. Problems in Psychology. 2 to 12 hours. May be repeated. Investigation of special 
problems under the direction of a staff member. Prerequisites: Consent of the 
instructor and of the head of the department. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

Note: The prerequisites stated apply to graduate majors in psychology. 
Students minoring in psychology or majoring in related fields may, 
with the consent of the instructor, enroll in certain courses without 
having met all prerequisites 

401. Experimental Psycholinguistics. 4 hours. Same as Linguistics 401 and Speech and 
Theater 401. Intensive review of experimental laboratory studies concerned with 
the effects of phonological, syntactic, and semantic variables on sentence 
perception, comprehension, production, and memory in the mature user of 
language. The relevance of the research in contemporary psycholinguistic theory 
is emphasized. Prerequisites: Psch. 354 or the equivalent and consent of the 
instructor. 



148 PSYCHOLOGY 



409. Seminar in Cognitive Psychology. 4 hours. May be repeated. Systematic review of 
special topics; emphasis on current research and theoretical developments. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

410. Experimental Approaches to Personality. 4 hours. Analysis of empirical and 
theoretical advances in experimental research in personality. Emphasis on the 
interaction of experimental factors in learning, motivation, and cognition with 
individual differences variables. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

411. Small Groups: Structure and Process. 4 hours. Same as Sociology 411. Systematic 
survey of research and theory dealing with social interaction and social 
relationships in small groups; primary groups as agents of social influence and 
social control. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

412. Research Methods in Social Psychology. 4 hours. Principles of design, data 
collection, and analysis of social psychological research in the laboratory and in 
naturalistic settings. Prerequisite: Psch. 444. 

416. Theories of Social Behavior. 4 hours. Current theoretical formulations and 
relevant data concerning major aspects of social behavior. Prerequisite: Psch. 310 
or the equivalent. 

419. Seminar in Social Psychology. 2 hours. May be repeated for credit. Critical 
discussion of selected topics, such as social judgment, group processes, attitude 
formation and change. Content will vary. Prerequisites: Relevant 300-level or 
400-level courses in social psychology and consent of the instructor. 

420. Advanced Developmental Psychology. 4 hours. Theory and research on psycho- 
logical development through adolescence; physical, mental, and social growth. 
Prerequisites: Psch. 220 or the equivalent and consent of the instructor. 

421. Developmental Psychology. 4 hours. Review of theories of behavioral 
development from a biological orientation. Prerequisites: Psch. 420 and consent 
of the instructor. 

423. Perceptual Development. 4 hours. Examination of contemporary theory and 
research dealing with the assessment and development of perceptual capacities in 
children. Prerequisites: Psch. 357 and 420. 

424. Social Development. 4 hours. Discussion at an advanced level of processes and 
substantive areas of social development; major stress on social learning theory, 
socialization, dependency, identification, and cognitive-developmental processes 
as they influence social development. Participation in a small research or interview 
project is required. Prerequisite: Psch. 420. 

425. Practicum in Developmental Psychology. 2 hours. May be repeated. Supervised 
practice in the observation and assessment of behavior development in naturalistic 
settings, including preschool, grade school, and special treatment units. Normal 
and exceptional children and adolescents. Prerequisites: Psch. 420 or the 
equivalent and consent of the instructor. 



PSYCHOLOGY 149 



427. Developmental Psycholinguistics. 4 hours. Same as Linguistics 427. Theoretical 
formulation, research methods, and research findings in the area of language 
development. Biological foundations and environmental influences; disorders of 
language development. Prerequisites: Psch. 354 or the equivalent and consent of 
the instructor. 

429. Seminar in Developmental Psychology. 2 hours. May be repeated. Systematic 
review of special topics; emphasis on current research. Prerequisites: Psch. 420 or 
the equivalent and consent of the instructor. 

430. Psychological Counseling. 4 hours. Basic principles, practices, and theories of 
counseling. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

434. Practicum in Organizational Psychology. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated. 
Supervised practicum in organizational settings, including industry and educa- 
tional institutions. Prerequisite: Psch. 330. 

435. Practicum in Psychotherapy. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit for a maximum 
of 8 hours. Supervised practice in a counseling or clinical setting. Application of 
basic principles; special emphasis on the problems of the culturally disadvantaged. 
Prerequisites: Psch. 430 and consent of the instructor. 

436. Personnel Measurement Techniques in Industry. 4 hours. Development, analysis, 
and use of tests in the selection, classification, and performance evaluation of 
industrial personnel. Practice in the development and validation of industrial 
classification and selection of test batteries are included. Prerequisites: Psch. 332 
or the equivalent and Psch. 345. 

438. Seminar in Organizational Psychology. 4 hours. May be repeated. Review of 
current topics, which are announced each quarter. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

439. Research in Counseling and Psychotherapy. 4 hours. Systematic review of special 
topics in individual treatment; emphasis on current research. Prerequisites: Psch. 
430 and consent of the instructor. 

441. Survey Research Methods. 4 hours. Same as Sociology 404. Methods of sampling 
human populations; interviewing techniques; techniques of analyzing survey data; 
the uses and limits of sample surveys in testing hypotheses; supervised 
participation in survey research. Prerequisite: Psch. 343 or the equivalent. 

443. Advanced Statistics II. 4 hours. The Chi-square and F-distributions, analysis of 
variance, individual comparisons, regression, and correlation analysis. Prerequisite: 
Psch. 343 or the equivalent. 

444. Experimental Design and Analysis of Variance. 4 hours. Analysis of variance and 
testing of hypotheses concerning contrasts in means in advanced experimental 
designs used in behavioral research. Prerequisite: Psch. 443 or the equivalent. 

445. Multivariate Analysis. 4 hours. The statistical analysis of functional relationships 
among two or more variables; various forms of correlation analysis; introduction 
to discriminant and factor analysis. Prerequisite: Psch. 443 or the equivalent. 



150 PSYCHOLOGY 



446. Research Methods in Naturalistic Settings. 2 hours. Problems associated with the 
collection and analysis of data in naturalistic settings, emphasizing unobtrusive 
measures and the logic of causal emphasis based on correlational procedures and 
quasi-experimental designs. 

447. Psychological Measurement. 4 hours. Scaling theory and methodology; emphasis 
on measurement in psychophysics, differential psychology, and social psychology. 
Prerequisites: Psch. 343 and 315 or 356 or the equivalents. 

449. Seminar in Quantitative Methods in Psychology. 2 hours. May be repeated. 
Systematic review of special topics; emphasis on current developments and 
applications. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

450. Special Topics in Physiological Psychology. 4 hours. Review of theory and 
research in various areas of physiological psychology, such as perception, 
emotion, motivation, and learning; emphasis on neuroanatomies, neurophysio- 
logies, and neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying these behaviors. 
Prerequisite: Psch. 362. 

451. Techniques of Psychological Intervention. 4 hours. May be repeated if instructor 
consents. Critical analysis of principles, techniques, and research in various types 
of psychological intervention. Each quarter the focus is on a different technique, 
such as behavior modification, psychotherapy, group therapy, play therapy, and 
community consultation. Prerequisite: Psch. 430. 

456. Discrimination Learning. 4 hours. Generalization, simultaneous and successive 
discrimination, secondary reinforcement, and choice behavior are studied with 
respect to various theoretical predictions. Oral presentations on related topics are 
required. Prerequisite: Psch. 350. 

470. Theories of Learning. 4 hours. Historical and methodological analysis of 
theoretical formulations of learning. Prerequisite: Psch. 350. 

472. Theories of Personality. 4 hours. Contemporary theoretical formulations 
concerning personality and their evidential basis. Prerequisite: Psch. 350 or 352. 

473. Advanced Psychopathology. 4 hours. A basic course for all graduate students in 
clinical psychology; a core course. Detailed consideration of disorders of behavior, 
including description, etiology, prognosis, and experimental and clinical research; 
development and function of classification systems. Prerequisite: Psch. 472. 

479. Seminar: Theoretical, Historical, and Philosophical Issues in Psychology. 2 hours. 

May be repeated. Same as History 479 and Philosophy 479. Systematic review of 
special topics; emphasis on current approaches and interpretations. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

480. Behavior Disorders in Children. 4 hours. Major types of maladjustment in 
childhood. Emphasis on the emotional, motivational, and intellectual difficulties 
of the culturally deprived. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



PSYCHOLOGY 151 



482. Psychological Appraisal I: Test Development, Intellectual Functions. 4 hours. 

Theory of test development and test assessment. Theory, research, and techniques 
relating to the assessment of intellectual abilities. Training in the administration, 
scoring, and interpretation of standard test methods. 

483. Psychological Appraisal II: Intellectual Functions and Structured Tests. 4 hours. 

Intelligence tests in clinical use. Theory and research relating to the development 
and use of structured tests for personality assessment. Training in the administra- 
tion, scoring, and interpretation of structured tests. Prerequisite: Psch. 482 or the 
equivalent. 

484. Psychological Appraisal III: Projective Techniques. 4 hours. Theory and research 
relating to the development and use of projective techniques for personality 
assessment. Training in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of 
projective techniques. Prerequisite: Psch. 483 or the equivalent. 

485. Practicum in Psychological Appraisal. 4 hours. May be repeated. Supervised 
practice in psychodiagnostic testing in various facilities associated with the 
graduate training program in clinical and counseling psychology. Prerequisites: 
Concurrent registration in Psch. 482 or 484 and consent of the instructor. 

487. Practicum in Instruction in Psychology. 8 to 12 hours. Supervised teaching of an 
undergraduate course and participation in a seminar dealing with techniques of 
course planning, teaching, and examining. Prerequisite: 6 hours of credit in Psch. 
490. 

488. Seminar on Clinical Psychology. 2 hours. Selected topics. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 

489. Seminar in Advanced Psychodiagnostics. 4 hours. Consideration of a series of 
children and adolescents with varied behavior and school problems who have been 
studied intensively with psychodiagnostic procedures and for whom extensive 
follow-up data are available. Appropriate readings; clinical report writing. 
Prerequisites: Psch. 484, 485, and consent of the instructor. 

490. Colloquium on the Teaching of Psychology. 2 hours. Problems and methods of 
teaching at the college level. Group discussion techniques; task analysis; test 
construction and analysis; curricular materials. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in 
the department. 

491. Colloquium on Research in Psychology. 2 hours. May be repeated for a total of 6 
hours. Discussion and evaluation of individual research projects; directed training 
in conducting research in different areas of psychology and in developing skills 
related to this research. 

495. Individual Research. 2 to 8 hours. May be repeated. Research on special problems 
not included in the graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Research on the topic 
of the graduate thesis. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor; approval of the 
research prospectus by the thesis committee. 



152 SOCIAL WORK 



THE JANE ADDAMS GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Professors: Mark P. Hale, Director; George W. Magner, Associate Director; W. 
Paul Simon, Mary Sullivan, Imogene Young, Sidney Zimbalist 

Associate Professors: Claire M. Anderson, Eloise J. Cornelius, H. Frederick 
Brown, James Forkeotes, Joseph R. Godwin, Ord Matek, Harvey Treger, 
Samuel Weingarten, Narayan Viswanathan 

Assistant Professors: Leona B. Cain, Lenora Cartright, Gloria J. Cunningham, 
John C. Dietmann, Frieda H. Engel, Joy Johnson, Kenneth Krause, Almera 
Lewis, Clarence Lipschutz, Ruth Meyer, Seymour Mirelowitz, Christopher G. 
Narcisse, Jeanore Parham, Sylvia Vedalakis, Hariette J. Watson, Dorothy R. 
Young 

Instructors: James Collier, Rae Freed 



The Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work offers, on both the 
Chicago Circle and the Urbana campuses, a program of professional study 
leading to the Master of Social Work. While each campus offers concen- 
trations in social treatment (direct practice), community organization and 
planning, and social welfare policy and services, there are some program 
differences; therefore, interested students should consult the School bulletins. 
There is presently an undergraduate social welfare major offered at Urbana; 
one is being developed at Chicago Circle. 

The educational program of the Jane Addams School is designed to give 
the student the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and philosophy basic to all 
professional social work practice rather than merely to prepare him for 
positions in specific agencies. Within each of the concentrations, there are 
organized curriculum areas that include human growth and behavior, social 
work practice, welfare policy and services, and social research. At Chicago 
Circle most of the second year offerings are electives, allowing the student to 
pursue individual career interests. In both years an extensive field, or direct 
practice, experience is required. 

In Chicago, field work is generally concurrent with class work, although 
several alternate models are being tested. The student will usually be placed in 
two distinct settings, with attention being paid to career interests and desired 
method of practice (casework, group work, community organization, etc.). 
There are a few instances where deference is given an agency from which a 
student holds a scholarship. 



Admission Requirements 

A satisfactory undergraduate scholastic record, 20 hours in the social 
sciences, and evidence of personal suitability for the field are the basic 



SOCIAL WORK 153 

requirements. The minimum undergraduate grade-point average is 3.500 and 
only under unusual circumstances is consideration given an applicant with a 
grade-point average below 3.500. 

Since the number of possible enrollments is limited and new students will 
be admitted only in the fall quarter, early application is advisable. 
Scholarships and fellowships are available through the School and through 
many public and private social agencies. 

A bulletin about the School and application forms may be obtained by 
writing the Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work at Chicago Circle, 
Box 4348, Chicago, Illinois 60680. A listing of agencies and field instructors 
is included in the School bulletin. 



The Joint Program with McCormick Theological Seminary 

A special curriculum has been arranged in cooperation with the 
McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago through which students may 
simultaneously complete requirements for the Master of Social Work 
(casework or group work) and the Bachelor of Divinity or Master of Arts in 
Christian Education or Master of Arts in Church and Community. 

This program is for a limited number of students who plan to engage 
specifically in social services under religious auspices. It usually requires three 
years of graduate study at the Seminary and at the School of Social Work. 
Financial assistance is available. Applicants must be accepted by both 
institutions and must apply to both. Seminary applicants should address: 
Department of Church and Community, McCormick Theological Seminary, 
2330 North Halsted Street, Chicago, Illinois 60614. 



Degree Requirements for the Master of Social Work 

Hours: Candidates must successfully complete 96 quarter hours of 
graduate work (including work in each of the four general areas) with a 
cumulative grade-point average of 3.750. An average of 3.750 is required if a 
candidate is to remain in good standing. Those whose average falls below 
3.750 in any quarter will be placed on probation and will be required to 
achieve a 3.750 minimum cumulative average by the end of the year. 

Residence: A minimum of 36 quarter hours of resident credit is required; 
the candidate must carry a full program (12 quarter hours) at Chicago Circle 
for at least three consecutive quarters. A maximum of 48 hours of credit may 
be transferred for work taken elsewhere. 

Time Limit: All requirements must be completed within six years. 
Military service is deducted. Exceptions may be made only in unusual 



154 SOCIAL WORK 



circumstances. Several plans have been developed for spreading the degree 
program over a three-year period with one year devoted to full-time work in 
residence. 



The Program at Chicago Circle 

Much of the first-year program of the Jane Addams Graduate School of 
Social Work at Chicago Circle is mandatory and is comprised of those courses 
considered generic to all aspects of social work practice. Students who enter 
the School with a strong undergraduate social welfare background may, upon 
satisfactorily demonstrating the necessary knowledge base, have some of 
these requirements waived. These first-year courses generally will include: a 
social work method or a combination of methods, welfare policy and services, 
an overview of community organization practice, social work research, human 
growth and behavior (with a dual focus on ego psychology and social science 
theory), and field instruction. In the second year there is a great deal of 
flexibility, and a number of electives and alternatives are available in all three 
of the major concentrations. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

Prospective students should note that the curriculum of the School of 
Social Work is undergoing extensive modification. Therefore, the following 
courses reflect only a portion of the total that are being developed. For 
example, in addition to the social treatment courses listed, there are a number 
of other electives: clinical diagnosis, crisis intervention, treatment with 
children, advanced group dynamics, treatment with adolescents, and others. 
In the foundation courses within Human Growth and Behavior are such 
electives as: human sexuality, drug abuse, majority and minority cultural 
interaction, the black experience, theories of personality, and theories of 
psychotherapy. There will also be available in the 1971-1972 academic year a 
number of courses within the newer concentrations— community organization 
and planning and social welfare policy and administration. Because many of 
these are still being processed they could not be included at the time of this 
printing. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Social Casework I. 2 to 4 hours. Analysis and study of the underlying philosophy, 
concepts, generic principles, and methods of social casework; role of the 
caseworker in offering service through a professional relationship. 

402. Social Casework II. 2 to 4 hours. Continues development of social casework 
concepts and principles through analysis of case material from secondary settings. 



SOCIAL WORK 155 



Consideration of psychological and cultural factors which affect the treatment 
process. Analysis of the interconnectedness of relationship, study-diagnosis, and 
treatment phases of social casework. Prerequisite: SocW. 401. 

403. Social Casework III. 2 to 4 hours. Continues Social Work 402. Emphasis on 
increased independent analysis of case material and use of relevant source material 
related to specific cases. Learning experiences are arranged to assist the student to 
acquire greater integration of philosophy, concepts, and principles in social 
casework. Prerequisite: SocW. 402. 

404. Social Casework IV. 2 to 4 hours. Continues study of casework principles and 
methods. Emphasis on work with clients with complex emotional and personality 
problems, the stresses which impair social and ego functioning, and the effects of 
agency setting. Prerequisite: SocW. 403. 

405. Family Diagnosis and Treatment. 3 hours. The evolution and definitions of family 
treatment; identification and examination of theories which add to the 
understanding of family diagnosis and treatment, application of selected theories 
and therapeutic methods to a variety of dysfunctional family situations. Use of 
family therapy in social work is stressed. Prerequisite: SocW. 403. 

406. Social Casework VI. 2 to 4 hours. Casework theory and practice focused on 
multiple-client interviewing and family diagnosis and treatment. Current issues in 
casework theory and the changing role of the caseworker in a changing society are 
discussed. Prerequisite: SocW. 405. 

407. Consultation. 2 to 4 hours. The knowledge and theory base of consultation; 
emphasis on the role of the social worker as a consultant. Examination of the 
several models of consultation and analysis of the characteristics and techniques 
of consultation in the various fields of social work practice. Prerequisites: SocW. 
443 and 403 or 413. 

411. Social Group Work I. 2 to 4 hours. Group-work methods, with focus on the 
worker's problems and procedures in understanding the group, its objectives, and 
its relationship to the agency. Beginning formulation of the worker's role in 
reference to assessment, interaction, analysis and small-group theory. 

412. Social Group Work II. 2 to 4 hours. Further emphasis on group methods, with 
intensive application of understanding and working with individuals in the group 
and in the agency. Social work practice with groups, including relationship, use of 
program, and the helping processes. Prerequisite: SocW. 411. 

413. Social Group Work III. 2 to 4 hours. The integration of concepts in the worker's 
role with the individual and the group; the referral processes. The worker's role as 
a strategy of intervention is developed. Prerequisite: SocW. 412. 

414. Social Group Work IV. 2 to 4 hours. Advanced principles of social group work in 
direct service with the group, advanced group theory, and concepts of group stress 
and crisis situations. The development of criteria for analysis of the worker's role. 
Prerequisite: SocW. 413. 



156 SOCIAL WORK 



415. Social Group Work V. 2 to 4 hours. Further development of the concepts of the 
worker's role in direct service, with refinements illustrated from analysis of 
treatment groups in special settings. Work with individuals, family groups, and 
interdisciplinary elements in collaboration. Prerequisite: SocW. 414. 

416. Social Group Work VI. 2 to 4 hours. The final course in the group- work sequence. 
Assists the student in the integration of method and analysis of his own practice. 
Emphasis is on the wider role of organizing and supervising group services. 
Selected concepts of subexecutive and supervisory functions are identified. 
Current issues and new modalities in social work with groups are developed. 
Prerequisite: SocW. 415. 

419. The Adolescent and His Family Group. 3 hours. Designed to promote diagnostic 
understanding of the adolescent and the family group with which he lives. 
Developmental study of the growth of families, the impact of an adolescent on 
the family system, and impact of the family system on the adolescent. Both 
normal and abnormal development are considered. Prerequisites: SocW. 443 and 
an introductory course in group process. 

421. Combined Treatment Methods I. 2 to 4 hours. Identification of components of 
social work practice, including underlying philosophy, concepts, generic 
principles, values, and methods of social casework and group work. Similarities 
and differences in the two primary social work treatment methods are considered. 
Emphasis on the social worker's role in offering service through a professional 
relationship in case and group situations. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree or 
consent of the instructor. 

422. Combined Treatment Methods II. 2 to 4 hours. Examination of social work 
practice theory through the development of different casework and group 
approaches. The worker's role is analyzed in terms of specific intervention 
strategies based on different theoretical orientations. A conceptual model 
framework is utilized to compare theories. Casework and group work models are 
analyzed separately and compared. Prerequisite: SocW. 421. 

423. Combined Treatment Methods III. 2 to 4 hours. Integration and application of 
social casework and group work concepts to social work practice. Emphasis on 
the worker's activity in serving clients with different kinds of problems in 
different social work settings. Examination of generic and specific aspects of 
casework and group work practice. Prerequisite: SocW. 422. 

425. Community Organization. 2 to 4 hours. Principles, concepts, and methods of 
community organization in social work at the neighborhood, local, state, national, 
and international levels. 



431. Field Instruction I. 3 to 6 hours. The student is assigned to a social agency where, 
under the supervision of a field instructor, he carries selected cases or groups for 
direct service to the agency clientele. Prerequisite: SocW. 401 or 41 1, which must 
precede or be taken concurrently. 



SOCIAL WORK 157 



432. Field Instruction II. 2 to 6 hours. The student is assigned to a social agency 
where, under the supervision of a field instructor, he carries selected cases or 
groups for direct service to the agency clientele. Prerequisite: SocW. 402 or 412, 
which must precede or be taken concurrently. 

433. Field Instruction III. 3 to 6 hours. The student is assigned to a social agency 
where, under the supervision of a field instructor, he carries selected cases or 
groups for direct service to the agency clientele. Prerequisite: SocW. 403 or 413, 
which must precede or be taken concurrently. 

434. Field Instruction IV. 4 to 8 hours. The student is assigned to a social agency 
where, under the supervision of a field instructor, he carries selected cases or 
groups for direct service to the agency clientele. Prerequisite: SocW. 404 or 414, 
which must precede or be taken concurrently. 

435. Field Instruction V. 4 to 8 hours. The student is assigned to a social agency 
where, under the supervision of a field instructor, he carries selected cases or 
groups for direct service to the agency clientele. Prerequisite: SocW. 405 or 415, 
which must precede or be taken concurrently. 

436. Field Instruction VI. 4 to 8 hours. The student is assigned to a social agency 
where, under the supervision of a field instructor, he carries selected cases or 
groups for direct service to the agency clientele. Prerequisite: SocW. 406 or 416, 
which must precede or be taken concurrently. 

441. Human Growth and Behavior I. 3 to 6 hours. The major forces influencing the 
growth and behavior of the individual from birth through adolescence. Socio- 
cultural, familial, physical, emotional, and intellectual factors as they enhance or 
retard social functioning. The relevance of this content to the profession of social 
work is constantly considered. 

442. Human Growth and Behavior II. 3 to 6 hours. The individual's growth and 
behavior from early through late adulthood. Considerations of the essential 
developmental tasks and central conflicts for each major life phase, with attention 
focused on differentiating kinds of knowledge about personality and social 
functioning. Prerequisite: SocW. 441. 

443. Human Growth and Behavior III. 3 to 6 hours. The nature and dynamics of social 
processes as related to growth and behavior. Study is centered on various groups 
within society— the family, class, ethnic group, and caste— and on the manner in 
which they influence individual personality development. The process of 
interaction and the meaning of membership within small groups is studied. 
Consideration is given to role expectations and the dynamics of small-group 
membership, particularly in the family. Attention is focused on the continuous 
process of change in group life and its effect on behavior. Prerequisite: SocW. 
442. 

444. Treatment Aspects of Rehabilitation. 2 to 4 hours. Study and analysis of the 
impact of catastrophic illness, disease, and rehabilitation procedures on the 
individual and his family; emphasis on the role of the social worker. Prerequisite: 
SocW. 443. 



158 SOCIAL WORK 



445. Human Growth and Behavior V. 3 to 6 hours. Psychopathology, including 
neuroses, psychoses, character disorders, psychosomatic dysfunction, organic 
conditions, and mental retardation. Discussion of diagnosis and treatment 
methods, including psychotherapy, somatic and drug therapies, and social work. 
Prerequisite: SocW. 444. 

446. Analysis and Study of Problems of the Aging. 3 hours. The physical, psychic, and 
economic aspects of aging with reference to the contribution of ego psychology 
and certain social science theories. The relevance of such study to the provision of 
social services to individuals and groups and the planning of comprehensive health 
services are stressed. Prerequisite: SocW. 443 or the consent of the instructor and 
the student's adviser. 

451. Community Problem Solving. 3 hours. Introduction to the nature and scope of 
social work intervention at the community level. Analysis of distinctive 
characteristics of the community as the locus for various social systems; emphasis 
on their implications for practice. Appropriate methods of problem solving. 

452. Community Development. 3 hours. Community development theory and practice 
are analyzed and evaluated with given practitioner roles, community resources, 
client systems, and other means of change and development as affected by a 
variety of social, cultural, political, economic, geographic, and historical 
considerations, both foreign and domestic. Emphasis on the conditions students 
are likely to encounter in actual practice. Prerequisite: SocW. 451. 

453. Community Planning. 3 hours. A range of approaches to community planning; 
special emphasis on their application to the development and implementation of 
social welfare programs. Examination of various levels of planning together with 
their relationship to other planning professions. Professional skills included are 
technical data collection, political processes, grantmanship, citizen involvement, 
advocacy roles, and models for evaluation. Prerequisite: SocW. 451. 

461. Special Studies in Social Work I. 2 to 6 hours. Independent or group study in 
areas of special interest; application of social work principles to special problems 
or settings. 

471. Social Services and Welfare Policy I. 2 to 4 hours. The function, nature, and scope 
of the social welfare institution. Social services as a response to social, personal, 
and economic problems of people. Effects of economic and social growth and 
change on the welfare enterprise. 

472. Social Services and Welfare Policy II. 2 to 4 hours. Social Work 472 and 473 will 
cover current provisions and alternatives for their solution in the social security 
and money assistance programs. Prerequisite: SocW. 471. 

473. Social Services and Welfare Policy III. 2 to 4 hours. Continues Social Work 472. 
Prerequisite: SocW. 472. 

474. Social Services and Welfare Policy IV. 2 to 4 hours. Current provisions and critical 
evaluation of welfare policy issues; alternatives for their solution in the social 
services for the aged, children, court wards, and the mentally and physically ill. 
Prerequisite: SocW. 473. 



SOCIOLOGY 159 



475. Social Services and Welfare Policy V. 2 to 4 hours. Continues Social Work 474. 
Prerequisite: SocW. 474. 

476. Administration in Social Work. 2 to 4 hours. Principles, concepts, and processes in 
social work administration. Special emphasis on leadership, policy and decision 
making, planning, and program organization. 

493. Social Research I. 2 to 4 hours. Objectives of social research, design of 
experiments, and measurement and methods of collecting data. 

494. Social Research II. 2 to 4 hours. Continues Social Work 493. Design of 
questionnaires and schedules; methods of data analysis, including statistical 
hypothesis testing and applications of inferential techniques; interpretation of 
results; preparation of the report; review of selected studies. Prerequisite: SocW. 
493. 

495. Social Research III. 2 to 4 hours. Seminar and tutorial as an aid to developing the 
research problem to be followed in the second year. Prerequisite: SocW. 494. 

496. Research Project I. 2 to 4 hours. Application of research methods to a social work 
problem in an individual or a group project. Prerequisite: SocW. 495. 

497. Research Project II. 2 to 4 hours. Application of research methods to a social 
work problem in an individual or a group project. Prerequisite: SocW. 496. 

498. Research Project HI. 2 to 4 hours. Application of research methods to a social 
work problem in an individual or a group project. Prerequisite: SocW. 497. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Professors: Robert L. Hall, Head of the Department; Robert E. Corley, Peter 
P. Klassen, Roger W. Little, George J. McCall, Mildred A. Schwartz, Ethel 
Shanas 

Associate Professors: M.Rue Bucher, James T. Carey, William W. Erbe,John 
W.C. Johnstone, John W. Martin 

Assistant Professors: Butler P. Crittenden, Kathleen Crittenden, Hazel S. 
Fisher, Edward P. Friedman, Gerald M. Swatez, Larry Tifft, Mary G. Wiley 

The Department of Sociology offers work leading to the Master of Arts 
and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

The program for the Master of Arts is in general sociology and aims to 
provide basic familiarity with the concepts, techniques, and substance of 
three broad subfields— social organization, social psychology, and demog- 
raphy and human ecology. The student's research for a thesis may be in a 
specialized area, such as medical sociology, urban sociology, or political 
sociology. 



160 SOCIOLOGY 



The program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology has two 
aims: to provide each student with advanced knowledge in a specialized area 
of sociology and to train each student to plan, conduct, and report empirical 
research in sociology. 



Admission Requirements 

Grade-Point Average: 4.000 (A=5.000) for the last two years of 
undergraduate work. A student whose average is between 3.750 and 4.000 
may petition for consideration. 

Graduate Record Examination: Satisfactory scores on the aptitude tests 
(verbal and quantitative). The advanced test in sociology is required as an aid 
in advising students, but it will not be a factor in admission. 

Students without strong undergraduate preparation in sociology are 
encouraged to apply if they meet the above standards. They will be required 
to complete extra courses to make up deficiencies. 

Students who have completed some graduate study elsewhere must, in 
addition to the above requirements, offer a grade-point average of 4.500 in 
previous graduate study. Training in logic, philosophy of science, mathe- 
matics, and statistics is strongly recommended for those who expect to 
pursue a graduate degree in sociology. Admission preference is given to 
students who have completed such training. 



Master of Arts 

Hours: 48 quarter hours, including 12 hours in Sociology 400, 401, and 
402, Theory and Method in Sociology, and 8 hours in seminars at the 400 
level. 

Comprehensive Examination: A candidate must satisfactorily complete a 
comprehensive examination. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

In addition to satisfying the general requirements of the Graduate 
College, students must complete graduate courses, selected in consultation 
with the student's major adviser, totaling at least 144 quarter hours beyond 
the bachelor's or 96 quarter hours beyond the master's. These courses must 
include Sociology 400, 401, and 402 and may include 24 hours in courses 
ojatside of sociology if the student's adviser approves. Students must 
successfully complete a qualifying examination in general sociology, which is 
given at the discretion of the department, and a preliminary examination in 
the student's area of specialization. A Ph.D. candidate must present evidence 



SOCIOLOGY 161 



acceptable to the student's examining committee that he: (a) has had 
supervised experience in empirical research at least equivalent to 8 hours of 
credit in the department's research practicum courses (Sociology 404, 405, 
406); (b) has had successful experience in the clear presentation of 
sociological materials to students and colleagues in the department pro- 
seminar or the equivalent to that available in Sociology 302. 

Thesis: Candidates must prepare a dissertation based upon empirical 
research. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

303. Sociological Statistics. 4 hours. Introduction to statistical tests of sociological 
hypotheses; estimation procedures; selected statistical procedures commonly used 
in sociology. Prerequisite: Soc. 263. 

315. Advanced Social Psychology. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 310. Critical analysis 
of empirical research on social perception, communication and influence, group 
structure, role analysis, and socialization processes. Individual projects are 
required. Prerequisites: Soc. 185 or Psch. 243, and 16 hours in sociology or 
psychology. 

316. Adult Socialization. 4 hours. Socialization as a process of induction into new 
roles, which occurs throughout the life cycle; the process is analyzed both at a 
social-psychological and a social-systems level with illustrations from various 
settings, such as marriage and family, and illness, migration, and particularly 
socialization into occupations and professions. Prerequisite: 8 hours of sociology 
at the 200 or 300 level. 

317. Social Psychology of Theater. 4 hours. Same as Speech and Theater 317. 
Compares social-psychological theories which are explicitly dramaturgical and 
theories of drama which are explicitly social. Considers dramatic works as 
social-psychological events. Prerequisite: Soc. 130 or Psch. 115. 

318. Sociology of Literature. 4 hours. How literature is influenced and in turn 
influences social forces; effects of social class, political and economic factors, and 
religious, ethnic, and racial affiliations on literary works; attitudes of writers, 
relationships to publics, reward systems, and related matters. Prerequisites: 8 
hours of upper-division sociology and 6 hours of literature (any department). 

320. Sociology of Mass Communications. 4 hours. Sociological analysis of the mass 
media of communication; empirical studies of the impact of the media on 
American society and culture; impact of television on children; effects of the 
media upon attitudes and opinions; processes by which news is created and 
transmitted. Prerequisite: 4 hours of upper-division sociology, or Soc. 100 and 
Spch. 113. 



162 SOCIOLOGY 



325. Age Groups and the Social Order. 4 hours. The relation of age groups to social 
structure; the demographic, sociological, and social-psychological conditions 
affecting the salience of age as a basis of social organization; recent writings on 
adolescents and youth; the theory of subcultures as applied to youth groups; 
relations between generations; current directions in the study of youth groups, 
both conventional and deviant. Prerequisite: 4 hours of upper-division sociology. 

341. Social Stratification and Classes. 4 hours. Nature and systems of differentiation 
and ranking in societies, emphasis on the class structure in the United States; life 
chances, prestige, status, power, and social mobility in the United States and 
other societies. Prerequisite. 8 hours of upper-division sociology. 

343. Sociology of Education. 4 hours. The relationship of the educational system to 
the social structure, major emphasis on the role of education in an advanced 
technological society. Prerequisite: 8 hours of sociology. 

344. Industrial Sociology. 4 hours. Analysis of industrial society and industrial 
institutions; the meaning of work and work relations and of the relationship 
between work and authority, with cross-cultural emphasis; sociological analysis of 
collective bargaining and of the impact of industrial and labor organizations on 
the community and on society. Prerequisite: 8 hours of sociology. 

345. The Sociology of the Family. 4 hours. The family as a social institution; its origin, 
its nature of kinship, its development, and its prospects. Prerequisite: 8 hours of 
sociology. 

346. Sociology of Science. 4 hours. Organization of the scientific enterprise; emergence 
of science as a social institution; interrelations with other institutions, such as 
government, religion, economy, and the arts. Science as a social phenomenon; 
regularities in scientific behavior; consideration of both historical and contem- 
porary material. Prerequisite: 8 hours of sociology. 

347. Sociology of Complex Organizations. 4 hours. Characteristics of business, 
government agencies, schools, hospitals, and other large-scale organizations, 
approaches used to study organizations, and theoretical and empirical analysis of 
organizational processes. Prerequisite: 8 hours of sociology. 

348. Military Institutions in American Society. 4 hours. Analysis of military 
institutions as components of the larger society; recruitment and socialization 
processes, behavior patterns in military organizations, paramilitary groups, and 
patriotic societies. Prerequisite: 1 2 hours of sociology or political science. 

349. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. 4 hours. Theoretical and empirical 
analysis of the occupational structure and occupational mobility processes in 
American and other industrial societies; patterns of recruitment and retention in 
occupations and professions. Prerequisite: Soc. 263. 

351. Medical Sociology. 4 hours. Sociological contributions to medicine and public 
health; social organization and the organization of health services; the sociology 
of illness. Prerequisite: 8 hours of upper-division sociology. 



SOCIOLOGY 163 



361. Social Gerontology: Old People in America. 4 hours. The aged: demographic 
trends, economic status, physical and social needs, family relationships. Prereq- 
uisite: 8 hours of upper-division sociology. 

365. The Sociology of Politics. 4 hours. Sociological interpretation of leadership, 
citizen participation, and the development of political organizations, using 
comparative materials from the United States and other countries. Prerequisite: 
12 hours of sociology. 

366. Community Power Structure. 4 hours. Analysis of the power structure of 
American communities; special emphasis on the relation between theoretical 
assumptions and research procedures in current community studies. Prerequisite: 
1 2 hours of sociology. 

371. Population I. 4 hours. Primarily for sociology majors and graduate students. The 
measurement and study of major trends and differentials in fertility, mortality, 
population growth, and age-sex composition in the United States and other 
countries. Emphasis on social and cultural determinants and consequences. 
Prerequisite: 12 hours of sociology, including Soc. 185 or the equivalent. 

372. Population II. 4 hours. The measurement and study of major trends in migration, 
population composition, marriage and divorce in the United States and other 
countries; theories and policies regarding population growth in relation to 
resources; population forecasting. Prerequisite: Soc. 371. 

373. Human Ecology. 4 hours. The relationship between man and the natural 
environment. Emphasis on importance of population patterns and human 
institutions in adaptation. Prerequisite: 12 hours of sociology, including Soc. 185 
or the equivalent. 

376. Urban Sociology. 4 hours. Review and analysis of recent research on urban areas, 
including their social organization, culture and subcultures, institutions, and 
contemporary problems. Prerequisites: Soc. 263 and 276. 

381. Topics in Social Change. 4 hours. Intensive analysis of a specialized topic on 
processes of social change. Each topic is announced at the time the class is 
scheduled. Prerequisites: 8 hours of upper-division sociology and consent of the 
instructor. 

385. History of Sociological Theory. 4 hours. The major theoretical systems that have 
developed in the field, beginning with the foundations in philosophical and 
scientific thought before Comte and proceeding to some of the contemporary 
representatives in the field. Prerequisite: Soc. 263 or 8 hours of sociology. 

389. Independent Study. 2 to 12 hours. Supervised study projects for graduate 
students and honors undergraduates; may consist of extensive readings in 
specialized areas of sociology or empirical research; exclusive of credit given under 
Soc. 499. Prerequsites: Soc. 263, 20 hours of sociology, and the approval of the 
department. 



164 SOCIOLOGY 



390. Strategies of Research Design and Analysis. 4 hours. The nature of sociological 
research; formulation of researchable problems; alternative research designs and 
procedures of data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: Soc. 263. 

393. Topics in the Sociology of Education. 4 hours. Intensive examination of a 
specialized topic, which is announced each time the course is scheduled. 
Prerequisites: 8 hours of upper-division sociology and consent of the instructor. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

400. Theory and Method in Sociology. 4 hours. Detailed examination of middle-range 
theories, such as compliant behavior, status congruence, and intervening 
opportunities in migration; the means of bringing evidence to bear on them. 
Emphasis on the link between theoretical assertions and data. Required of all 
graduate majors. May be taken out of sequence with consent of the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

401. Theory and Method in Sociology. 4 hours. Continues Sociology 400. Required of 
all graduate majors. May be taken out of sequence with consent of the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Soc. 400. 

402. Theory and Method in Sociology. 4 hours. Continues Sociology 400 and 401. 
Required of all graduate majors. May be taken out of sequence with consent of 
the instructor. Prerequisite: Soc. 401. 

403. Advanced Statistics in Sociology. 4 hours. Analysis of contingency tables; 
multiple and partial, linear and nonlinear correlation; analysis of variance. 
Prerequisite: Soc. 303. 

404. Survey Research Methods. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 441. Methods of sampling 
human populations; interviewing techniques; techniques of analyzing survey data; 
uses and limits of sample surveys in testing hypotheses; supervised participation in 
survey research. Prerequisite: Soc. 403. 

405. Experimental Methods in Sociology. 4 hours. Design and analysis of laboratory 
and field experiments on human groups and organizations; uses and limits of 
experiments in testing sociological hypotheses; supervised participation in 
experimental research. Prerequisite: Soc. 403. 

411. Small Groups: Structure and Process. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 411. 
Systematic survey of research and theory dealing with social interaction and social 
relationships in small groups; primary groups as agents of social influence and 
social control. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

419. Seminar: Social Psychology. 2 to 6 hours. May be repeated for credit up to a total 
of 16 hours. Intensive analysis of special topics. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

441. Social Organization. 4 hours. Analysis of selected social institutions, such as the 
family, educational system, political structure, and others; development and 



SPEECH AND THEATER 165 



interrelationships of social institutions; function of various institutions in simple 
and complex societies. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

459. Seminar: Sociology of Medicine. 2 to 6 hours. May be repeated for credit up to a 
total of 16 hours. Intensive analysis of special topics. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

469. Seminar: Sociology of Politics. 2 to 6 hours. May be repeated for credit up to a 
total of 16 hours. Intensive analysis of special topics. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

471. Population Theory and Methods. 4 hours. Critical examination of the nature and 
development of population theories; study of research techniques and application 
to problem areas. Prerequisite: Soc. 372. 

476. Sociology of Urban Life. 4 hours. Demographic, ecological and social processes 
involved in the development of the urban community; emphasis on the effects of 
urban development on these processes and the organization of human life in the 
city. Prerequisite: Soc. 376. 

490. Colloquium on College Teaching of Sociology. 4 hours. Sociological analysis of 
contemporary university teaching; specific information and techniques for the 
presentation of sociology at the college level. Prerequisite: One quarter of 
graduate study. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Students registering 
for thesis research will register for credit under this number. 



SPEECH AND THEATER 

Professors: Donald H. Dickinson, R. Victor Harnack, Chester C. Long, Carl A. 
Pitt, Harry J. Skornia 

Associate Professors: Katharine T. Loesch, Barbara S. Wood 

Assistant Professors: Natalie S. Schmitt 

The department offers courses of study leading to the Master of Arts in 
Speech and Theater, with specialization in communication and public address 
and in theater. 



Admission Requirements 

Admission to the program requires a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
university. Students who apply for graduate status in speech must present the 
equivalent of 30 quarter hours of study in speech and theater and must have 



166 SPEECH AND THEATER 



achieved a grade-point average of 4.000 (A=5.000) for the last 90 quarter 
hours of their undergraduate work. Students who have fewer than the 
required 30 hours or have a grade-point average below 4.000 may petition for 
special consideration. 



Degree Requirements 

A thesis and successful completion of a comprehensive examination are 
required for the degree. A minimum of 48 quarter hours, of which at least 16 
hours are at the 400 level, must also be presented. Of these 48 hours, at least 
36, including thesis credit (6 to 12 hours), must be in speech and theater; the 
remaining 12 must be either in speech or in approved courses in other 
departments. 



Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Communication Analysis. 4 hours. Descriptions, models, proposed dimensions, 
and statistical treatment of the communication process. Prerequisties: Spch. 112, 
113, 201 or 202, and 210. 

302. Group Communication Theory. 4 hours. Detailed analysis and observation of 
group processes from the viewpoint of modern information and field communi- 
cation theory. Prerequisites: Spch. Ill, 112, 113, 210, and 211. 

303. Theories of Language Performance. 4 hours. Contemporary theories and related 
research in language performance, centering upon selected approaches to language 
acquisition and behavior; special emphasis on the psycho linguistic approach. 
Prerequisites: Spch. 112, 201 or 202, and 210 or the equivalent or sufficient 
language-linguistic background. 

311. American and British Public Address 1. 4 hours. Critical and historical study of 
American and British speakers and their speeches to 1850. Prerequisites: Spch. 
Ill, 112, 113, and any two of Spch. 211,212, 213. 

312. American and British Public Address II. 4 hours. Continues Speech and Theater 
311. From 1850 to 1920. Prerequisites: Spch. Ill, 112, 113, and any two of 
Spch. 211,212, 213. 

313. Contemporary Public Address. 4 hours. Contemporary speechmaking; principal 
focus on issues relating to economics and government, World War II, postwar 
international problems, and civil rights. Prerequisites: Spch. Ill, 112, 113, and 
any two of Spch. 211, 212, 213. 

315. The Rhetoric of Free Speech. 4 hours. The rhetorical processes employed by 
those speakers in the British House of Commons and in America who participated 
in the freedom of speech movements. Consideration is given to issues relating to 
the contemporary American scene. Prerequisites: Spch. 212 and PolS. 355. 



SPEECH AND THEATER 167 



317. Social Psychology of Theater. 4 hours. Same as Sociology 317. Compares 
social-psychological theories which are explicitly dramaturgical and theories of 
drama which are explicitly social. Considers dramatic works as social- 
-psychological events. Prerequisite: Soc. 130 or Psch. 115. 

321. European Theater History I. 4 hours. Historical survey of the theater and theater 
arts of ancient Greece and Rome, medieval Europe, the Italian Renaissance, and 
Elizabethan England. Prerequisites: Spch. 121 and at least 8 hours of credit 
chosen from Spch. 241, 251, 261, 262, 264, and 265. 

322. European Theater History II. 4 hours. Historical survey of the theater and theater 
arts from the seventeenth century to modern times in Europe and England. 
Prerequisites: Spch. 122 and at least 8 hours of credit chosen from Spch. 241, 
251, 261, 262, 264, and 265. 

324. American Theater History I. 4 hours. Development of the American theater from 
1700 to 1914; historical trends and dramatic literature. Prerequisites: Spch. 122 
and at least 8 hours of credit chosen from Spch. 241, 261, 262, and 264. 

325. American Theater History II. 4 hours. Development of the American theater from 
1914 to the present; native and European influences in determining theatrical 
trends. Prerequisites: Spch. 122 and at least 8 hours of credit chosen from Spch. 
241, 261, 262, and 264. 

328. Play Production Prospectus. 4 hours. Seminar; emphasizes the stage director's 
central function in creating an artistic concept for producing a play and 
coordinating all elements of performance in an aesthetic unity. Historical research 
of a recognized classic and preparation of a complete production book. 
Prerequisites: Spch. 251, 264, and 265. 

329. Theatrical Criticism. 4 hours. Seminar in the study and practice of theatrical 
criticism, principally modern and contemporary criticism. Historical bases of 
critical judgment of play and performance; function and influence of the critic in 
establishing artistic standards and cultivating public taste. Preparation of 
criticisms of current productions. Prerequisites: Spch. 122, 123, 261, and 264. 

331. Mass Media Programming. 4 hours. Mass media program types; objectives, 
methods, and effects; creative development of programs from conception to 
script. Prerequisites: Two courses in speech including Spch. 232. 

333. Mass Communications Seminar. 4 hours. The nature of mass media in contem- 
porary society. The legal and social responsibilities of mass media institutions in 
the United States and abroad. Prerequisites: Two courses in speech including 
Spch. 131. 

334. World Broadcasting. 4 hours. The boradcast systems used by the nations of the 
world; alternative and "mixed" systems; international organizations, agreements, 
exchanges, and problems; broadcasts to and from other countries; implications of 
such new developments as satellites; mass and nonmass uses. Prerequisites: Spch. 
113, 131, and 231. 



168 SPEECH AND THEATER 



351. Scene Design and Lighting. 4 hours. A lecture- lab oratory approach to the role of 
stage lighting in scene design. Analysis of historical background and sources; 
special emphasis on such areas as theories, psychological and aesthetic factors, and 
lighting application techniques and equipment. Lectures, readings and practical 
problems. Prerequisite: Spch. 251. 

354. The Psychology of Language. 4 hours. Same as Linguistics 354 and Psychology 
354. Introductory survey of methods, theory, and research; acquaints students 
with the history and present status of psychology's interest in language behavior. 
Prerequisite: Spch. 303. 

361. Periods and Styles of Acting. 4 hours. Concentration on premodern styles of 
acting from these periods: classical Greece, commedia dell'arte, Elizabethan, 
Restoration and the eighteenth century, nineteenth century melodrama, and 
naturalism. Prerequisite: Spch. 262. 

371. Advanced Study in Language. No credit. Intensive study of language and speech 
activities of elementary school children; particular attention to those children 
labeled language disabilitied. Includes the study of language acquisition and 
applicable speech activities. Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
institution. 

372. Instructional Applications of Television and Radio. 4 hours. Television and radio 
as instructional communications media; the design of instructional materials 
relating the communications requirements of subject matter to communications 
capabilities of television and radio; production, utilization, and evaluation of 
instructional television and radio presentations. Prerequisites: Spch. 131 and two 
courses chosen from Spch. 231, 232, 233. 

397. Proseminar in Speech and Theater. 4 hours. Examination of research trends and 
methodologies appropriate to the area. Prerequisite: 30 hours of credit in speech 
and theater. 

Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Experimental Psycholinguistics. 4 hours. Same as Linguistics 401 and Psychology 
401. Intensive review of experimental laboratory studies concerned with the 
effects of phonological, syntactic, and semantic variables on sentence perception, 
comprehension, production, and memory in the mature language user. The 
relevance of the research in contemporary psycholinguistic theory is emphasized. 
Prerequisites: Spch. 354 or the equivalent and consent of the instructor. 

404. Seminar in Speech and Language Behavior. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit up 
to 12 hours. Speech and first-language development; speech and language 
differences and related communicative problems within and across subcultures; 
recent research in speech and language mechanisms. Prerequisite: Spch. 303. 

407. Seminar in Interpersonal Communication. 4 hours. Studies of problem solving in 
dyadic and larger small group structures. Prerequisite: Spch. 302. 



SPEECH AND THEATER 169 



413. Proseminar in Persuasion. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit up to 12 hours. 
Examination of contemporary theory and research involving variables in the 
persuasive process. Prerequisites: Spch. 210, 213, and any one of Spch. 311,312, 
313, or 315. 

421. Seminar in Theater History. 4 hours. Specialized study of selected aspects of the 
American theatrical scene. Prerequisites: Spch. 324 and 325. 

422. Theories of Theater. 4 hours. Comparative study of the esthetics of theater. 
Nature of the theatrical experience. The function and status of theater in various 
cultures. Emphasis on modern theories. Prerequisites: At least three courses 
chosen from Spch. 321, 322, 324, 325, 328, and 329. 

423. Special Topics in Criticism. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Seminar in 
theatrical criticism. Intensive analysis of an individual critic or school or critical 
history of an important play; preparation of original criticism, applying existing 
standards and developing the student's individual approach. Prerequisite: Spch. 
329. 

439. Television and Society. 4 hours. The performance of radio and television in terms 
of content, government and industry controls, social responsibility, economic 
bosses, and effects. Prerequisites: Spch. 131 and 8 hours chosen from Spch. 231, 
232, 233, 239, 331, 333, 334. 

451. Theater Architecture and Production. 4 hours. Seminar in esthetic and technical 
problems presented by the interrelation of theater, stage, audience, and play. 
Field study of types of Chicago theaters and stages. Prerequisites: Spch. 251 and 
351. 

468. Physiological and Acoustic Phonetics. 4 hours. Same as English 468. Theories of 
physiological phonetics. The acoustics of speech. Acoustic bases for analysis, 
descriptions, and classification of the sounds of languages. Prerequisite: Ling. 451. 

469. Topics in Phonology. 4 hours. Same as English 469. Contemporary theories of 
phonology; the nature of sound systems of languages; methods of investigating 
and describing such systems. Prerequisite: Ling. 451. 

495. Problems of Teaching Speech. 4 hours. Seminar in teaching methods and 
procedures. Prerequisite: Spch. 295. 

498. Independent Research. 4 to 8 hours. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum 
of 8 hours. Department-approved research projects not included in thesis research. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the head of the department. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 
16 hours. Students registering for thesis research will register under this number. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the head of the department. 



170 ACCOUNTING 

Additional Courses for Graduate Credit 

ACCOUNTING 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

300. Managerial Cost Accounting. 4 hours. Analysis of costs for control, decision 
making, and planning; standards and budgets as a guide to measuring operating 
performance. Prerequisite: Actg. 302. 

301. Asset Valuation and Income Determination. 4 hours. The development, 
applications, and limitations of accounting theory as related to the valuation of 
assets and measurements of income. Prerequisite: Actg. 102. 

302. Accounting for Entity Interest. 4 hours. Accounting for rights of creditors, 
stockholders, and partners in a going concern; effects of expansion and 
contraction on equities; basic principles of fiduciary and fund accounting. 
Prerequisite: Actg. 301. 

303. Auditing. 4 hours. The history, function, and theory of auditing; nature of the 
necessary evidence for the accountant's professional opinion concerning financial 
position and the results of enterprise operations; applications of statistical 
sampling; auditing computerized systems. Prerequisite: Actg. 302. 

304. Federal Income Tax. 4 hours. Concepts of federal income tax; its effects on 
decisions of corporations, partnerships, individuals, and trusts. Prerequisite: Actg. 
300. 

305. Planning and Control. 4 hours. The budget as a formal plan of action; the effect 
of decision making, forecasting, and uncertainty on the determination of 
enterprise goals; guidance techniques for the accomplishment of the planned 
objectives of a firm. Prerequisite: Actg. 300. 

306. Readings and Advanced Problems. 4 hours. Consolidated statements, foreign 
subsidiaries, insurance, estates, theory, general statements. Prerequisite: Actg. 
302. 

307. Federal Income— Advanced. 4 hours. Advanced development of the basic concepts 
discussed in Accounting 304. Tax factors affecting business decisions of 
corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts; special problems in reorganizations, 
liquidations, and personal holding companies; the federal estate tax and gift tax. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. For accounting majors: Actg. 304. 

Courses for Graduate Students 

400. Managerial Accounting I. 4 hours. Basic concepts and tools of analysis necessary 
for the quantification, recording, and communication of financial events. 



ADMINISTRATION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 171 



401. Managerial Accounting II. 4 hours. Accounting methods applicable to the 
determination and analysis of financial data relevant to managerial decision 
problems. Topics include cost behavior, budgeting for planning and control, cost 
allocation, cost accounting systems, and capital budgeting. Prerequisite: Actg. 
400. 

402. Financial Accounting I. 4 hours. Formulation of a conceptual model of 
accounting valuation and its implications for accounting practice; accounting 
valuation methods applied to assets and equities and their relationship to the 
conceptual model; concepts and criteria underlying income determination. 
Prerequisite: Actg. 401. 

403. Financial Accounting II. 4 hours. Accounting procedures applicable to the 
formation, expansion, and dissolution of different business entities, such as 
partnerships, corporations, trusts, and estates; emphasis on accounting for the 
corporate entity. Prerequisite: Actg. 402. 

406. Financial Planning and Control. 4 hours. The uses of financial information for 
decision making and control; the role of the accounting system and corporate 
controller in developing and refining the data necessary for cost control and 
managerial planning. Prerequisite: Actg. 401. 



ADMINISTRATION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

313. Advanced Criminalistics Analysis Laboratory. 5 hours. Continues Criminal Justice 
211. Covers more advanced concepts of identification and individualization, 
including the examination of less frequently encountered physical evidence 
materials, and empirical data requirement for interpretation of examinations. 

314. Forensic Instrument Laboratory I. 5 hours. Theory and procedures of separation, 
purification, and identification of components of forensic interest; extension of 
concepts introduced in Administration of Criminal Justice 211 and 212. Various 
methods, such as chromatography, solvent systems, and electrophoresis, are 
discussed. Prerequisites: CrJ. 211 and 313. 

315. Forensic Instrument Laboratory II. 5 hours. Advanced instrumental analytical 
procedures applied to such substances of forensic interest as physiological fluids, 
polymeric compounds, and pharmaceuticals. Instruments treated may include 
pyrolysis GLC, UV-IR spectrometer, atomic absorption, and differential thermal 
analysis. Prerequisites: CrJ. 211 and 314. 

335. Organized Crime in the United States. 4 hours. The development of organized 
crime throughout history; detailed consideration of the political, social, and 
economic conditions involved in the appearance, spread, and expansion of 
organized crime in America. Prerequisites: CrJ. 101, 102, 231; Soc. 225, 276. 

339. Institutional Treatment of Offenders. 4 hours. The role of the custodial and 
correctional institutions in the treatment of the offender; philosophy of 



172 ADMINISTRATION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

administration and management of institutions; survey of historical development 
and current trends in jails and prisons. Prerequisites: CrJ. 101 and 102; Soc. 225 
and 276. 

340. Criminal Self and Criminal Careers. 4 hours. The development of criminal 
self-conceptions; social-psychological processes of group alienation; development 
of commitment and professionalization in the development of criminal careers. 
Selected case studies. Prerequisites: Soc. 100, CrJ. 231. 

345. Community Treatment of Offenders. 4 hours. The history and development of 
program relating to community treatment of offenders; examination of the 
philosophies and programs dealing with the rehabilitation and reintegration of the 
offender into society. Prerequisites: CrJ. 101 and 102; Soc. 225 and 276. 

350. The Role of Law Enforcement in Community Relations. 4 hours. Analysis of the 
relationship between law enforcement and the social structure of the community, 
including an examination of the significant problem areas involving minority 
elements, cultural and ethnic groups, power and social- elite, and political and 
social-action movements. Prerequisites: CrJ. 101 and 102; Soc. 225 and 276; 
PolS. 205. 

351. Criminal Law I: Substantive Criminal Law. 4 hours. Required in the curriculum in 
the administration of criminal justice; cannot be substituted for a criminal law 
course taken by law students. General doctrines of criminal liability in the United 
States; classification of crimes as against persons, property, and the public 
welfare. Emphasis on the concept of governmental sanctions of the conduct of 
the individual. Prerequisites: CrJ. 101 and 102. 

352. Criminal Law II: Criminal Procedure. 4 hours. Required in the curriculum in the 
administration of criminal justice; cannot be substituted for a criminal law course 
taken by law students. The criminal process. Legal problems associated with the 
investigation of crime, the acquisition of evidence, the commencement of a 
criminal proceeding, the prosecution and defense of charges, sentencing, and 
appeal. Principal concern is with the development of existing procedures and 
examination of current efforts for reform. Prerequisite: CrJ. 351. 

353. Criminal Law HI: The Instrumentalities of Criminal Justice. 4 hours. Required in 
the curriculum in the administration of criminal justice; cannot be substituted for 
a criminal law course taken by law students. Continues Criminal Justice 352. 
Examination of the agencies which play significant roles in the criminal process. 
Functions of the law enforcement agency, counsel, and the courts. Particular 
emphasis on the responsibilities and interrelationships of the agencies examined. 
Prerequisite: CrJ. 352. 

354. Evidence. 4 hours. Rules of evidence as they apply to judicial proceedings and 
administrative hearings relative to the criminal process. Development of the 
underlying rationale of the rules. Emphasis on the relationship between methods 
of evidence collection and admissibility. Prerequisite: CrJ. 353. 

360. Industrial and Commercial Security Administration. 4 hours. Theories and 
philosophy of the administration of industrial and commercial security functions; 



ARCHITECTURE 173 



survey of contemporary organization and management of security operations; 
application of law enforcement principles within private enterprise. Prerequisites: 
CrJ. 103, 258, and 259. 

391. Proseminar in Criminal Justice. 4 hours. Study in depth of current issues, 
problems, and developments of serious concern within the field of the 
administration of criminal justice. Prerequisites: CrJ. 101, 102; Soc. 225, 276; 
PolS. 205. 

398. The Problem of Justice. 4 hours. Same as Political Science 398. The premodern 
view of justice, such as Plato's or Aristotle's; the modern understanding of justice, 
such as Hobbes' or Locke's, which is the foundation of the modern political 
regime; Rousseau's seminal political thought on justice which is the basis of a 
variety of reforms and alternatives offered to Hobbes' and/or Locke's political 
regime. Prerequisite: Two courses in political science, including PolS. 151. 

399. Independent Study. 4 hours. For administration of criminal justice majors only. 
Independent study and research under the direct supervision of a faculty member, 
on a subject or subjects not covered in the regular curriculum. Prerequisites: 
Consent of the instructor by preregistration in the Curriculum Office; Soc. 225, 
276; PolS. 205; at least five criminal justice courses, including CrJ. 101 and 102. 



ARCHITECTURE 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Architectural Design VII. 6 hours. Comprehensive architectural problems. 
Prerequisite: Arch. 204. 

302. Architectural Design VIII. 6 hours. Comprehensive architectural design problems. 
Prerequisite: Arch. 301. 

309. Architectural Design Thesis. 6, 9, or 12 hours. May be repeated for a total of 18 
hours. Individual problems in architectural design. Prerequisite: Arch. 301. 

311. Forensic Architecture. 3 hours. Legal problems in architecture. Prerequisite: Fifth 
year standing. 

312. Computer Applications in Architecture. 3 hours. The use of electronic computers 
in building design and construction. Prerequisite: Math. 194 or 195. 

313. Building Construction Systems. 6 hours. Static and dynamic environmental 
control systems. Prerequisites: Arch. 204 and 215. 

314. Industrialized Building. 3 hours. Prefab rication of building components. Prereq- 
uisite: Fifth year standing. 

315. Logistics of Building Construction. 3 hours. Problems encountered in the logistics 
of building construction. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing. 



174 ART-DESIGN 



316. Environmental Control Systems. 6 hours. Problems of color, illumination, heating 
and air conditioning systems, and acoustics. Prerequisite : Arch. 313. 

319. Building Technology Thesis. 6, 9, or 12 hours. May be repeated for a total of 18 
hours. Individual problems in building technology. Prerequisite: Arch. 313. 

331. Architecture Seminar. 1 to 5 hours. May be repeated for a total of 15 hours. 
Current problems in architecture. Prerequisite: Fourth year standing. 

332. Architecture Reading Course. 1 to 5 hours. May be repeated for a total of 15 
hours. Individually planned readings on selected topics under supervision of a 
faculty member. Prior to registration the student should be advised by the 
instructor. Prerequisite: Fourth year standing. 

339. Architectural Humanities Thesis. 12 hours. Individual problems in the architec- 
tural humanities. Prerequisite: 21 hours in the history of architecture. 

343. Professional Practice. 3 hours. Problems related to the practice of architecture. 
Prerequisite: Fifth year standing. 



ART-DESIGN 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

300. Art and Design Synthesis. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Individual-project 
course. Students develop projects that synthesize the experience of 200-level 
courses in the Department of Art. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary activities. 
Prerequisites: 40 hours of 200-level courses in the Department of Art and 
approval of the department. 

301. Industrial Design. 4 to 16 hours. Design of physical systems based upon user 
behavior, technical resources, and environmental factors. Investigation of system 
failures and product dysfunctions at the man/machine, work space, and 
environmental levels. Projects are developed by the student through tutorial 
consultation with an assigned instructor. Prerequisites: AD 225 or graduate 
standing and approval of the department. 

302. Communications Design. 4 to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. A 
comprehensive project in the area of social communications. A total program or a 
series of related units for use in one or more communications media is developed 
by each student through tutorial consultation with an assigned instructor. 
Prerequisites: Completion of the communications design sequence and approval 
of the department. 

305. Plastic and Graphic Arts. 4 to 16 hours. Individual projects in the plastic and 
graphic arts area are developed by each student through tutorial consultation with 
an assigned instructor; may involve supportive consultation in all areas of the 
department to permit breadth and invention in media and processes. Prereq- 
uisites: 25 hours of appropriate 200-level courses and approval of the department. 



BUSINESS LAW, ECONOMICS 175 



315. Independent Studies. 4 to 12 hours. May be repeated for credit. Independent 
study, under supervision of a staff member, in an area of design or plastic and 
graphic arts not covered in the regular curriculum. The course is offered at the 
request of the student and only at the discretion of the staff members concerned. 
Prerequisites: 30 hours of 200-level courses and approval of the department. 

355. Photography-Film Tutorial. 4 to 16 hours. May be repeated for a total of 16 
hours. Independent study course. Sustained projects in any area of film activity or 
still photography. Prerequisites: AD 265 or 275 and approval of the department. 



BIOENGINEERING-See Information Engineering. 

BUSINESS LAW 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

310. Managerial Jurisprudence. 4 hours. Application of the legal function to business 
administration. Basic legal tools for business transactions and corporate opera- 
tions; legal aspects of the major segments of business management. 

ECONOMICS 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

320. Macroeconomic Theory. 4 hours. Principles of national income accounting, 
determination of aggregate income and employment, the monetary system in 
relation to income and employment, short-term income fluctuations, long-term 
income growth. 

321. Microeconomic Theory. 4 hours. Operation of individual markets; market 
structure; theory of the firm; theory of production; demand theory; general 
equilibrium and welfare economics. Prerequisite: Fin. 340. 

322. Managerial Economics. 4 hours. Application of economic theory to decision 
making in the business firm. Demand and cost analysis, including demand 
forecasts; price policy of the individual firm; capital budgeting; production 
analysis; uses of operations research methods. Prerequisite: Econ. 321. 

323. Business Conditions Analysis. 4 hours. Application of economic theory to analysis 
of changes in aggregate income and employment; quantitative economic models 
and their uses in the prediction of aggregate and more refined levels of business 
activity. Prerequisite: Econ. 320. 

324. Economic History of the United States. 4 hours. Growth of the American 
economy from colonial times to the present; special emphasis on the forces and 
factors contributing to this process. Prerequisites: Econ. 121 and 8 hours of social 
sciences. 



176 ECONOMICS 



325. Economic History of Europe. 4 hours. Evolution of the economic institutions of 
Europe, beginning with the origins of capitalism; the development of industry, 
commerce, transportation, finance, and labor. Prerequisites: Econ. 121 and 8 
hours of social sciences. 

326. History of Economic Thought. 4 hours. Examination of the evolution of positive 
and normative economics from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 121 and 9 hours of social sciences. 

327. Comparative Economic Systems. 4 hours. Description and analysis of the 
normative and positive characteristics of capitalism, fascism, democratic socialism, 
and communism. Prerequisites: Econ. 121 and 8 hours of social sciences. 

328. Government Finance. 4 hours. Government finance at the federal, state, and local 
levels, including government expenditures; principles of taxation; fiscal policy; 
government borrowing and the national debt; intergovernmental fiscal relations. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 321. 

329. Industrial Organization. 4 hours. The structure of markets; behavior of firms 
within the market environment; measures of industrial concentration; economics 
of scale; mergers and the merger movement; price discrimination and tie-in sales; 
monopoly and cartel arrangements; resale price maintenance; innovation and 
technological change. Prerequisite: Econ. 321. 

330. Government and Business. 4 hours. The rationale and the mechanisms of the 
social control of business; the effects of government action in influencing the 
behavior of business firms; the procompetitive policy embodied in the Sherman 
Act and related legislation. Prerequisite: Econ. 321. 

331. Labor Economics. 4 hours. Economic problems and issues of trade union 
organization and wage theory; job security, hours, working conditions, labor 
legislation, unemployment. Prerequisite: Econ. 320 or 321. 

332. Urban Economics. 4 hours. Survey of economic problems of cities; the nature and 
function of cities; the demand for and supply of housing and urban land; the 
implications of location theory for the spatial pattern of cities; the impact of 
government programs. Prerequisites: Econ. 121 and 8 hours of social sciences. 

333. International Economics. 4 hours. The balance of payments; fixed, flexible, and 
multiple exchange rates; the forward exchange market; the international trade 
multiplier; the transfer problem; capital flows; the law of comparative advantage; 
the gains from trade; tariffs and subsidies; the factor price equalization theorem; 
international economic communities. Prerequisite: Econ. 320 or 321. 

334. Economic Development. 4 hours. Basic problems and characteristics of under- 
developed countries; classical, neoclassical, and modern contributions to the 
theory of development; major proposals for accelerating development; basic 
approaches to economic development; laissez-faire, interventionism; role and 
methods of planning; foreign aid; and economic integration. Prerequisite: Econ. 
320 or 321. 



EDUCATION 177 



335. Econometrics. 4 hours. Specification of economic models; measurement of 
variables; estimation of economic relationships and testing of economic 
hypotheses; single equation problems in estimation; introduction to simultaneous 
equation estimation. Prerequisites: Econ. 320 and 321. 

336. Introduction to Mathematical Economics. 4 hours. Application of mathematics to 
theories of consumer and producer behavior, to the determination of prices in 
markets, and to growth and stability features of macroeconomic models. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 320, 321; Math. 110, 112. 

398. Independent Study in Economics. 2 to 5 hours. May be repeated once for credit. 
For students who wish to do independent study in an area not covered by existing 
course offerings, or to explore in greater depth a problem or subject covered in a 
previously taken course. Prerequisites: 15 hours of 300- level economics courses 
and consent of both a faculty member and the head of the department. 

399. Special Topics in Economics. 4 hours. Exploration of an area not covered in 
existing courses offerings, or study in greater depth or at a more advanced level, 
of a problem or subject that is covered in an existing course. Subject matter, and 
sometimes the prerequisite, will vary from quarter to quarter; prior to registration 
students should consult the department secretary for further information. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours of 300-level economics courses. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

400. Managerial Economics. 4 hours. Economic analysis applied to business operations; 
theory of production and cost analysis; capital theory; pricing of products and 
factors. Prerequisites: Econ. 320, 321; Fin. 341. 



EDUCATION 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Educational Policy in Urban America. 4 hours. Same as Political Science 301. 
Examination of selected urban phenomena in relation to educational bureau- 
cracies and school socialization processes. Emphasis on: historical investigation of 
strategies for protest and change employed by ghetto populations; conditions that 
fostered these strategies; responses of schools and other target institutions; 
social-philosophical analysis of ideologies supporting both protest and response. 
Prerequisites: One course in the social foundations of education or the equivalent 
and consent of the instructor. 

320. Social Development of Urban Children. 4 hours. A basic course that covers the 
general principles of social learning and socialization during childhood and the 
factors common to urban children that illustrate and modify these principles. 
Classroom observation of children and interviewing is required. Prerequisite: Psch. 
220, or the equivalent by consent of the instructor. 



178 EDUCATION 



321. Learning in the Urban Classroom. 4 hours. Examination of psychological theories 
and principles of learning as they apply to the teaching-learning process; particular 
attention to the investigation of central concepts of the psychology of learning in 
the urban classroom. Prerequisites: Ed. 210 and 230 or the equivalents and 
consent of the instructor. 

323. Introduction to Early Childhood Education. 6 hours. 4 hours class time; 6 hours 
per week in schools. Educational implications of major schools of thought 
concerning the nature and course of child development and learning; differential 
effectiveness of programs oriented to various theories; special emphasis on 
intervention programs designed for impoverished populations, including Head 
Start. Prerequisites: Psch. 101 and 220 or the equivalents and consent of the 
instructor. 

330. Curriculum, Instruction, and Evaluation in Urban Education I. 4 hours. A 
laboratory-discussion course; emphasizes the changing role of education in urban 
society and the implications of changes on curriculum decision making, design, 
instruction, and evaluation. Prerequisites: Ed. 250 or graduate standing and 
consent of the instructor. 

331. Improving Learning Environments in Secondary Schools. 4 hours. Development 
of the basic skills and the understanding necessary to bring about productive 
changes in a school system; the skills are developed in conjunction with that of a 
plan for improving a specific learning environment. The consequences of change 
in the school as a social system. 

332. Issues in Secondary Curriculum. 4 hours. Analysis of selected issues; investigation 
of viewpoints in related literature; field investigations when pertinent. Specialists 
are invited. 

370. Field Work for Urban Education. 8 hours. Time is shared between field work and 
classroom to enable students to become intimately aware of some of city life as it 
affects children and education. The different work sections are: (1) workers in a 
black community; (2) workers in a Latin or Indian community; (3) workers in a 
selected white ethnic community; (4) school administrators and counselors; (5) 
workers in human relations arenas. Prerequisites: Ed. 250 or graduate standing 
and consent of the instructor. 

371. Community Education Laboratories. 5 hours. 3 hours class time; 10 to 14 hours 
per week in directed field work. Analysis of the colonialist nature of the 
educational enterprise and of the relationships among the educational controllers, 
the teacher, and the community, through reading, lecture, discussion, and field 
work. Consideration of techniques for altering professional accountability of 
teachers from the employing community to those people the teacher purports to 
help: students and community. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

383. Teaching English as a Second Language. 4 hours. Same as English 383 and 
Linguistics 383. The methodology of teaching English to residents of the United 
States who do not speak the language, especially Spanish-Americans. A brief 
description of the structure of American English, methods of teaching each aspect 
of its structure, various teaching devices and aids, special problems that may arise, 
and an examination of various texts. Prerequisite: Ling. 315. 



EDUCATION 179 



390. Critique of Educational Literature, Research Design, and Methodology. 4 hours. 

Individual projects are assigned. Introduction to educational research literature; 
analysis of research findings in urban education; research methods and design in 
education; current issues in research methodology. Each student formulates a 
researchable problem and designs a systematic study in his area of concentration. 
Prerequisites: Ed. 250 or graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

400. Seminar in Educational Sociology. 2 hours. Sociological survey of the urban 
educational institution in the contexts of its neighborhood and of the larger social 
order. The school is considered a community with its own social structure and 
culture interacting with a neighborhood with a differing social structure and 
culture. The interface between school and neighborhood is studied in detail. 
Prerequisites: Ed. 370 or the equivalent and consent of the instructor. 

430. Curriculum, Instruction, and Evaluation in Urban Education II. 4 hours. 

Emphasizes dynamics of group decision making in developing curricula for 
community schools, producing instructional materials for a selected community, 
and evaluating effectiveness of the instructional materials. The different work 
sections are: (1) black ghetto community; (2) Spanish-speaking community; (3) 
other selected communities. Prerequisites: Ed. 330, 370, 490 or the equivalent, 
and consent of the instructor. 

431. Curriculum Theory and Technology. 4 hours. Components of the curriculum 
system are analyzed through the study of curriculum theory. The technology of 
curriculum planning, implementing and evaluating local, state, and national 
curricula is explored. Prerequisites: Ed. 430 or the equivalent and consent of the 
instructor. 

440. Guidance in the Urban School: Principles and Functions. 4 hours. Examination of 
the guidance process concerned with providing for the developmental needs of all 
pupils. The interrelated roles of teacher, counselor, and other staff members in 
fostering a climate where healthy personalities can develop; emphasis on the full 
use of school and community resources. Prerequisites: Ed. 370 and consent of the 
instructor. 

441. Student Appraisal Procedures in the Urban School. 4 hours. Examination of some 
of the ways in which the teacher and counselor can assess child behavior and 
development. Nontesting methods and interpretation of selected achievement, 
aptitude, and interest tests at different educational levels. Emphasis on the 
understanding of cultural factors that may limit effective appraisal. Prerequisite: 
Ed. 440. 

442. The Counseling Process. 4 hours. The nature, functions, and goals of counseling in 
an urban school or youth center. Selected theories, with applications for school 
and agency counseling, and related problems and issues. An introduction to 
counseling interaction is provided through role-playing and supervised interviews 
in which study skills and related educational problems are presented. Prerequisite: 
Ed. 441. 



180 FINANCE 



449. Internship in Counseling Urban Youth. 8 hours. Students are assigned to urban 
schools where they function as assistant counselors. Responsibilities may include 
tutorial counseling, testing and testing interpretation, conferences with staff 
members and parents, preparing educational and vocational materials, arranging 
occupational field trips, and developing working relations with community 
agencies and organizations. Prerequisite: Ed. 442. 

450. Foundations of School Administration. 4 hours. Introductory course in urban 
school administration. Emphasis on the interdisciplinary study of both the 
theoretical and practical aspects of administration. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

451. Administration Problems in Urban Schools. 4 hours. The school as a social 
institution and its role in the solution of contemporary social problems. Emphasis 
on community-school relationship and its effect on school administrators. 
Prerequisite: Ed. 450. 

459. Internship in School Administration. 8 hours. For students enrolled in the 
master's program in school administration. Students are placed in schools and 
community agencies to obtain practical knowledge of some of the community- 
school relationships studied in Education 450 and 451. Prerequisite: Ed. 451. 

462. Teaching Reading to Black and Spanish-Speaking Inner-City Students. 4 hours. 

Examination of effective methods and materials. Particular emphasis on the 
interference of nonstandard language systems and/or Spanish. Section A: teaching 
black students; Section B: teaching Spanish-speaking students. Prerequisite: Ed. 
46 1 or Ling. 315. 

497. Individual Study. 1 to 6 hours. Students design, implement, and analyze results of 
a researchable problem in their individual area of concentration. Completed study 
is reviewed by faculty and peer committees. Prerequisites: Ed. 390 or the 
equivalent and consent of the instructor. 



FINANCE 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

340. Money and Banking. 4 hours. Monetary and banking systems. The Federal 
Reserve System; monetary theory; international monetary relations; monetary 
policy in the United States. Prerequisite: Econ. 121. 

341. Business Finance. 4 hours. No credit for graduate students in the finance 
curriculum. Nature of business finance and its relation to economics, accounting, 
and law; legal nature and forms of business enterprise; capital, capitalization, and 
financial planning; financial analysis and interpretation; initial financing, refin- 
ancing; working capital; income administration, including dividend policies; 
expansion; internal and external financial and economic relationships of the firm. 
Prerequisites: Actg. 102 and Econ. 320. 



FRENCH 181 



342. Investments. 4 hours. Types and distinguishing features of securities, security 
markets, analysis of financial statements and principles of valuation, quality 
differences, selection of securities to meet varying personal and institutional 
objectives. Prerequisites: Fin. 340 and 341. 

343. Risk and Insurance. 4 hours. Basic principles; applications in different areas (life 
and property insurance); management of risks in the firm (insurance versus 
self-insurance); social and economic significance of insurance in the economy. 
Prerequisites: Fin. 340 and 341. 

344. Investment Policy. 4 hours. Varying strategies to meet diverse objectives; 
investments for individuals, business firms, banks, insurance companies, pension 
and profit-sharing funds; interrelation of investment policies and the economic 
environment. Prerequisties: Fin. 342 and Econ. 323. 

345. Problems in Business Finance. 4 hours. Selected areas in advanced corporate 
finance, including short-term asset management; capital budgeting under certainty 
and uncertainty; capital structure and dividend policy and theory; valuation and 
risk; the structure of capital asset prices, and implications of that structure for 
financial policy of firms. Prerequisite: Fin. 341. 



FRENCH 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Stylistics I: Prose. 4 hours. Detailed analysis of the style of selected French 
authors; practice in advanced composition. Prerequisite: Fr. 211 or the 
equivalent. 

302. Stylistics II: Poetry. 4 hours. Detailed analysis of the style of selected French 
authors; practice in advanced composition. Prerequisite: Fr. 222 or the 
equivalent. 

311. Short Prose Fiction. 4 hours. French prose narrative forms, excluding the novel, 
from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 

202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

316. French Poetry I. 4 hours. Major poets from the fourteenth through the eighteenth 
centuries. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

321. French Literature of the Middle Ages I. 4 hours. From the origins to 1300. Texts 
in modern French: chansons de geste; courtly romances (Chretien de Troyes, et 
al.); Roman de Renard, and others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 

203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

322. French Literature of the Middle Ages II. 4 hours. The fourteenth and fifteenth 
centuries. Texts in modern French: chroniclers; lyric poetry; religious and comic 
drama. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 



182 FRENCH 



323. History of the French Language. 4 hours. From its origins to the present. 
Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

332. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. 4 hours. Major writers to be read in 
modern French: Marot, Sceve, Rabelais, Ronsard, Du Bellay, Montaigne, and 
others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

333. The Pleiade. 4 hours. Theory and practices of the Pleiade poets: Ronsard, Du 
Bellay, Belleau, Baif, J ode lie, Pontus de Tyard, Desportes, and others. Prerequi- 
sites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

334. Montaigne: His Essais and His Age. 4 hours. Detailed study of Montaigne's life, 
thought, and times as reflected in the Essais. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two 
of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

341. Seventeenth Century French Prose Writers. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
major prose writers: Descartes, Pascal, Bossuet, Mme. de Sevigne, La Bruyere, and 
others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

342. Seventeenth Century French Theater. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of major 
dramatists: Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of 
Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

344. Seventeenth "Century French Poetry. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of major 
poets: Malherbe, Baroque poets, La Fontaine, and Boileau. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 
and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

345. The Seventeenth Century French Novel. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of major 
novelists: d'Urfe, Sorel, Scarron, Cyrano, Mme. de Lafayette, Les Lettres 
Portugaises, and others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 
205 or the equivalents. 

351. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century I. 4 hours. Prose writers; reading and 
analysis of Lesage, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire, Rousseau, and others. 
Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

352. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century II. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
major dramatists: Crebillon, Voltaire, Marivaux, Diderot, Beaumarchais, and 
others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

353. Literary and Intellectual Currents of the Eighteenth Century. 4 hours. Reading 
and analysis of selected works tracing major literary and intellectual currents; 
Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, and others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and 
any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

354. The French Novel of the Eighteenth Century. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
selected novels of Prevost, Crebillon fils, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and others. 
Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 



FRENCH 183 



359. Preromanticism. 4 hours. The Preromantic movement in France from 1761 to 
1814. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

360. La Bataille Romantique. 4 hours. Manifestos, polemical writings, and major 
literary productions of the period. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 
203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

361. French Romanticism I. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of selected works tracing 
the main developments in the Romantic movement from 1815 to 1829; Hugo, 
Stendhal, Merimee, Lamartine, Vigny, and others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any 
two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

362. French Romanticism II. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of selected works tracing 
the main developments of the Romantic movement after 1830; Nerval, 
Baudelaire, Sand, Musset, Hugo, and others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of 
Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

363. The French Novel of the Nineteenth Century I. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
major novelists: Chateaubriand, Senancour, Mme. de Stael, Constant, Lamartine, 
and others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

364. The French Novel of the Nineteenth Century II. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
major novelists: Stendhal, Balzac, Merimee, George Sand, Flaubert, and others. 
Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

365. The French Novel of the Nineteenth Century III. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
major novelists: the Goncourt brothers, Zola, Maupassant, Loti, France, and 
others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

366. French Poetry II. 4 hours. Major poets of the nineteenth century; Lamartine, 
Hugo, Musset, Vigny, Gautier, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarme, and 
others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

368. Modern French Drama I. 4 hours. Major dramatists of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries; Hugo, Vigny, Musset, Dumas fils, Augier, Becque, and others. 
Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

369. Modern French Drama II. 4 hours. Continues French 368. Curel, Porto-Riche, 
Rostand, Claudel, Lenormand, and others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of 
Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

370. Modern French Drama III. 4 hours. Continues French 368 and 369. Cocteau, 
Giraudoux, Anouilh, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, and others. Prerequisites: 
Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

371. French Poetry III. 4 hours. Major poets of the twentieth century; Jammes, Jacob, 
Apollinaire, Valery, Eluard, Breton, Aragon, Perse, Michaux, Prevert, and others. 
Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 



184 FRENCH 



372. The French Novel of the Twentieth Century I. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
selected novels by Gide, Proust, Mauriac, Colette, Cocteau, and others. Prerequi- 
sites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

373. The French Novel of the Twentieth Century II. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
selected novels of Malraux, Aragon, Saint-Exupery, Celine, Giraudoux, and 
others. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the 
equivalents. 

374. The French Novel of the Twentieth Century III. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of 
selected novels by Sartre, Camus, Robe-Grillet, Sarraute, Butor, and other 
contemporary novelists. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of Fr. 202, 203, 204, 
205 or the equivalents. 

379. Introduction to Afro-French Literature. 4 hours. Selected prose and poetry of 
sub-Sahara African Francophone literature. Prerequisites: Fr. 201 and any two of 
Fr. 202, 203, 204, 205 or the equivalents. 

381. Introduction to Linguistics. 4 hours. French phonology, morphology, syntax, and 
semantics in comparison with English. Prerequisites: Fr. 212, 222, 281 or the 
equivalents. 

382. Teachers Course. 4 hours. Resources, classroom materials, standard practices, and 
problems in the teaching of French; practical application to actual classroom 
situations. Prerequisite: Fr. 381 or consent of the instructor. 

399. Seminar in Selected Topics. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. Specific 
movements, authors, or works. Topics are announced in the Timetable. 
Prerequisite: Semi or standing and/or consent of the instructor. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

403. Explication de Textes. 4 hours. Detailed critical and stylistic analysis of selected 
short pieces of French prose and poetry. Lectures, discussion, and student 
explications. Prerequisites: Fr. 313 and 314 or the equivalents. 

404. Modern French Phonetics and Phonology. 4 hours. One hour per week in the 
language laboratory. Phonetic description and transcription. Training in diction 
and interpretation of literary texts. Phonetics as a teaching device. Prerequisites: 
Fr. 313 and 314 or the equivalents. 

405. The Teaching of College French. hours. Required of all graduate teaching 
assistants. Problems of teaching French at the college level; classroom procedures, 
and the preparation and grading of tests and final examinations. Prerequisite: 
Teaching Assistant in French. 

406. Introduction to Old French Philology: I Phonology. 4 hours. Phonological 
development of the French language from classical and vulgar Latin. 



GEOGRAPHY 185 



415. The Libertins in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. 4 hours. Intensive 
study of works not usually covered in courses on seventeenth and eighteenth 
century literature. Prerequisites: Fr. 323, 324, 325, and 326. 

427. Romantisme Social. 4 hours. Development of Romantic thought after the 
Revolution of 1830. Social consciousness of Sand, Hugo, Lamartine, Musset, 
Vigny. Influence of Leroux and Lamennais. 

430. The Use of Greek Mythology in the Contemporary French Theater. 4 hours. 

Greek tragic vision in the works of Cocteau, Giraudoux, and Anouilh. 
Prerequisites: Fr. 319 and 324 or the equivalents. 

440. Seminar for Master of Arts Candidates. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. 
Topics to be announced each quarter. 

490. Independent Study for Graduate Students. 1 to 8 hours. May be repeated for 
credit up to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of the head of the 
department. 

499. Thesis Research. to 16 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval 
of the department. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

303. Principles of Climatology. 4 hours. Climatology; macroclimatology and micro- 
climatology; particular emphasis on fluxes of energy and mass at the interfaces 
between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The environment and man, 
plants, and animals; special emphasis on urban microclimatological problems. 
Prerequisites: Geog. 101, 102, and 103. 

306. Fundamentals of Landform Analysis. 3 hours. Theories of landform processes and 
techniques of analysis. Prerequisite: Geog. 101 or GeolS. 102. 

311. Geography of Population. 4 hours. Broad treatment of the problems created by 
the changing distributions and numbers of the world's population. Emphasis on 
the relationships between population and resources; intensive study of the 
implications for both overpopulated and underpopulated areas of the world. 
Prerequisites: Geog. 190 and 210. 

312. Geography of Religions. 4 hours. Systematic treatment of geographical manifesta- 
tions of the major religious systems of the world. Special attention to the 
geographical origins and dispersal mechanisms of religious systems and to the 
manner in which man organizes his life within the framework of his belief. 
Intensive study of applications being made in the geographical inquiry of religious 
systems. Prerequisites: Geog. 190 and 210. 

330. Location Theory and Spatial Analysis. 4 hours. Spatial analysis in relation to 
theories of location of economic activity and regional development. Theoretical 



186 GEOGRAPHY 



systems; development and derivation of locational patterns of agricultural, 
manufacturing, and teriary activities. Prerequisites: Geog. 190 and one course 
chosen from Geog. 230, 231, 233, or 235; or Econ. 121 or Mktg. 360. 

335. Geographical Modeling of Transportation Systems. 4 hours. Discussion of the 
principles of spatial interaction; emphasis on commodity flows and passenger 
movements, the practicality of network analysis, and the impact of transportation 
facilities on land use and regional development. Techniques include simulation 
and evaluation of existing transportation systems and solutions to theoretical 
transportation problems. Prerequisite: Geog. 235 or 383. 

336. Decision Making and Resource Management. 4 hours. The nature of decision 
making schema in resource management; classifying problems according to 
elements that may enter into decisions in the management of natural resources. 
Emphasis on attitudes on environmental quality and human adjustment to natural 
hazard. Prerequisites: Geog. 190 and 236. 

350. Areal Organization of Urban Systems I. 4 hours. Geographic aspects of intracity 
relationships. Topics include the city as a complex man-machine system, and areal 
patterns of urban growth and development within the context of cross-sectional 
and longitudinal models. Prerequisites: Geog. 251 or 330 or one course in the 260 
series and one in the 360 series. 

351. Areal Organization of Urban Systems II. 4 hours. Geographic aspects of intercity 
relationships. Topics include patterns of intercity flows and development, 
continuous and hierarchical ordering of urban places, measurement of areal 
alignments, and the theoretical implications of different types of areal patterns. 
Prerequisite: Geog. 350. 

361. Problems of the Humid Tropics. 4 hours. Natural and human aspects of tropical 
areas; problems of the humid environment relating to landforms, land use, 
resources, economic and social phenomena and institutions; emphasis on the 
development potential of humid, tropical lands. Individual research projects are 
assigned. Prerequisites: One upper-division research methods course, one two- 
course systematic sequence, and one course in the 260 series or one course in the 
350 series. 

362. Problems of Arid Regions. 4 hours. Natural and human aspects of arid areas; 
problems of the environment relating to landforms, land use, resources, and 
economic and social phenomena and institutions; emphasis on the development 
potential of arid lands. Individual research projects are assigned. Prerequisites: 
One upper-division research methods course, one two-course systematic sequence, 
and one course in the 260 series or in the 350 series. 

365. Interregional Exchange Dynamics. 4 hours. Spatial analysis of the economic, 
social, and political facts that have resulted from and in, human and commodity 
flows among regions; special attention to the important relationships resulting 
from regional differences. Prerequisites: Geog. 311 or 330 or 190 and either 230, 
231, 233, or 235 or Econ. 121 or Soc. 271. 



GEOGRAPHY 187 



381. Geographic Information Systems I. 3 hours. Problems encountered in the 
gathering and use of geographic data and the structuring of research within the 
light of existing relevant theory, measurement systems capabilities, and recog- 
nized objectives of research activities. Topics include review of data sources, 
methods of measurement, sampling models, and problems of dealing with 
aggregated reporting units, records matching, and missing data. Prerequisites: 
Geog. 182, 190 (or Math. 117, or Soc. 185, or QM 272), one 12 hour 
introductory sequence, and one 8 hour systematic sequence. 

382. Geographic Information Systems II. 4 hours. Application of inferential statistical 
techniques and probability models in geographic research. Topics include use of 
descriptive parameters in recognizing geographic relationships, tests of signifi- 
cance, and recognition of particular areal patterns. Prerequisite: Geog. 381. 

383. Geographic Information Systems III. 4 hours. Problems encountered in the 
management and portrayal of geographic data. Topics include preparation of data 
for manual and machine processing, data condensation and characterization, 
observation indexing, and the preparation of graphic and tabular displays. 
Prerequisite: Geog. 382. 

385. Thematic Cartography. 4 hours. Discussion and experiments involving graphic 
representation of real-world areal patterns; preservation of geodetic and informa- 
tion properties; information generalization and reconstruction; semiotic problems 
and communications capabilities of mapped informational displays. Prerequisites: 
Geog. 285 or 382 and consent of the instructor. 

386. Introduction to Areal Patterns. 4 hours. The characteristics and evaluation of 
selected real-world patterns. Application of the concepts of randomness and 
interdependence to the problem of understanding certain of the physical and 
cultural processes affecting the arrangement of objects in the landscape. 
Prerequisites: Geog. 286 or 382 and consent of the instructor. 

387. Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4 hours. Principles and practice in 
interpretation of aerial photographs, radar, and infrared imagery. Knowledge of 
elementary physics and geometry is recommended. Prerequisites: Geog. 287 and 
consent of the instructor. 

391. Review of Geographic Thought and Research Methods. 4 hours. Introduction to 
the theory and techniques of geographic research; modern geographic philosophy; 
interpretative analysis of bibliographic sources and the preparation of a 
bibliography; preparation and evaluation of individual papers on selected topics. 
Prerequisites: Two 2-course systematic sequences, one upper-division research 
methods course, one 300-level urban or regional course, and consent of the 
instructor. 

399. Special Studies in Geography. 2 to 5 hours. May be repeated twice for credit for a 
total of 10 hours. Readings and reports in selected fields chosen in consultation 
with the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



188 GREEK 

GREEK 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

305. Homer: Iliad. 4 hours. Reading and translation of extensive selections from the 
poem. Introduction to Homeric scholarship. Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical 
Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 

310. Pindar. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of selected Odes. Prerequisite: 8 hours of 
classical Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 

315. Aeschylus: Agamemnon. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of the play; discussion of 
the use of myth. Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the 
equivalent. 

330. Aristophanes. 4 hours. Reading and translation of at least two plays. Prerequisite: 
8 hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 

340. Demosthenes. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of two or more speeches; study of 
their historical background. Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical Greek at the 200 
level or the eqivalent. 

350. Plutarch. 4 hours. Reading and interpretation of one or more of the Moral Essays 
or the Lives. Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the 
equivalent. 

360. Plato: The Republic. 4 hours. Reading and interpretation of selections; analysis of 
style and thought, and the development of some of the major arguments. 
Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 

365. Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of selections from 
several books. Sources and problems of Aristotle's ethical writings. Prerequisite: 8 
hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 

370. Thucydides. 4 hours. Reading and translation of selections from Thucydides' 
history of the Peloponnesian War. Sources and problems of Greek historiography. 
Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 

380. Hellenistic Poetry. 4 hours. Reading and analysis of selections from 350 B.C. to 
350 A.D. Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the 
equivalent. 

381. Greek Literary Criticism. 4 hours. Reading and translation of Aristotle's Poetica 
and selections from Longinus' On the Sublime. Prerequisite: 8 hours of classical 
Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 

382. Greek Rhetoric. 4 hours. Selected texts illustrative of the Greek contribution to 
the art of rhetoric; special attention to the Rhetoric of Aristotle. Prerequisite: 8 
hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 



HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND ART 189 



399. Independent Reading. 1 to 4 hours. May be repeated for credit. For Greek majors 
and graduate students. Independent study under faculty direction. Prerequisite: 8 
hours of classical Greek at the 200 level or the equivalent. 



HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND ART 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

331. Seminar in Architecture History. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned 
papers are required. Selected problems in the history of architecture. Prior to 
registration the student should be advised by the instructor. Prerequisite: 12 
hours from HAA 231 through 238. 

332. Readings in the History of Architecture. 4 hours. Individual conferences on 
assigned papers are required. Individually planned readings on selected topics 
under the supervision of a faculty member. Prior to registration the student 
should be advised by the instructor. Prerequisite: 12 hours from HAA 231 
through 238. 

333. Literature, Theory, and Criticism. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned 
papers are required. Selected readings and discussion of significant writers on 
architecture. Prior to registration the student should be advised by the instructor. 
Prerequisite: 12 hours from HAA 231 through 238. 

334. Chicago Building. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. 
Architectural and technical history of Chicago's commercial buildings from 1871 
to the present. 

335. Wright and His Contemporaries, 1890 to 1910. 4 hours. Individual conferences on 
assigned papers are required. Frank Lloyd Wright's domestic buildings in the 
Chicago area and his relationship to other members of the "Prairie School" of 
midwest architecture. Lectures, discussions, and field trips. Prerequisite: 12 hours 
from HAA 231 through 238. 

336. Seminar: Adler and Sullivan. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers 
are required. Critical study of Chicago's foremost architectural partnership: 
monuments, theories, and practice. Prerequisites: 12 hours from HAA 231 
through 238 and HAA 334. 

341. Art of the Fifteenth Century in Florence. 4 hours. Individual conferences on 
assigned papers are required. Stylistic and iconographic studies of the works of 
the major painters, sculptors, and architects. Florentine history and literature in 
their relation to the visual arts. Prerequisite: 4 hours in history of architecture and 
art courses at the 200 level. 

342. Art of the High Renaissance. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers 
are required. Art of the great Italian centers during the late fifteenth and early 
sixteenth centuries. Emphasis on Leonardo, Raphael, Bramante, Bellini, Gior- 
gione, and Michelangelo. Prerequisite: 4 hours in history of architecture and art 
courses at the 200 level. 



190 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND ART 



343. Italian Art from 1520 to 1600. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers 
are required. Art of the sixteenth century; emphasis on painting and sculpture. 
Special attention is given to Correggio, Pontormo, Bronzino, Gianbologna, 
Michelangelo, Palladio, Titian, and Tintoretto. Prerequisite: 4 hours in history of 
architecture and art courses at the 200 level. 

361. Proseminar in Modern Painting. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit at the 
discretion of the department. Individual conferences on assigned papers are 
required. Selected examples; development and diffusion of style and iconography. 
Analogies in the history of ideas and events, technical change, and other pertinent 
material. Prerequisite: 4 hours in history of architecture and art courses at the 
200 level. 

362. Proseminar in Modern Sculpture. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit at the 
discretion of the department. Individual conferences on assigned papers are 
required. Selected examples; development and diffusion of style and iconography. 
Analogies in the history of ideas and events, technical change, and other pertinent 
material. Prerequisite: 4 hours in history of architecture and art courses at the 
200 level. 

363. Contemporary Art. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are 
required. The most recent developments in contemporary art, its theories and 
production. Prerequisite: 4 hours in history of architecture and art courses at the 
200 level. 

372. Japanese Prints. 4 hours. History from the fourteenth century to the present; 
emphasis on Ukiyoe Hanga of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries. Prerequi- 
site: HA A 272 or the equivalent. 

390. Art History Tutorial. 4 hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are 
required. Methodology and philosophies of art history; application to selected 
problems in the field. Readings, discussions, and reports concerning fundamental 
literature of art history. Prerequisite: 1 2 hours in history of architecture and art 
courses at the 200 and 300 levels. 

391. Special Studies in History of Art. 4 hours. May be repeated for a total of 12 
hours. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Discussions of 
special problems with attention to a major theme, period, or artist each quarter. 
Student reports are required. Prerequisite: 1 2 hours in history of architecture and 
art courses at the 200 and 300 levels. 

392. Readings in Art History. 4 hours. May be repeated for credit at the discretion of 
the department. Individual conferences on assigned papers are required. Individu- 
ally planned readings on selected topics under supervision of a faculty member. 
Prior to registration the student should be advised by the instructor. Prerequisite: 
1 2 hours in history of architecture and art courses beyond the 100 level. 



LATIN, LINGUISTICS 191 

LATIN 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Corpus Caesar ianum. 4 hours. For advanced undergraduates, graduates, secondary 
teachers of Latin, and prospective teachers. Rapid reading of Latin prose, based 
on the Corpus Caesarianum; discussion of the linguistic, literary, social, and 
political aspects that contribute to the understanding of the texts read. 
Prerequisite: At least one year of Latin beyond Lat. 106. 

340. Lucretius. 4 hours. Reading and interpretation of extensive selections from De 
rerum natura. Prerequisite: 4 hours credit in Latin at the 200-level or the 
equivalent. 

348. St. Augustine: The Confessions. 4 hours. Study of the autobiographical portions 
of The Confessions. Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Latin. 

350. Medieval Latin. 4 hours. Literary and linguistic study of Latin texts originating 
between 350 and 1350 A.D. Prerequisites: Lat. 106 and 203 or the equivalents. 

381. Roman Literary Criticism. 4 hours. The principal contributions of Latin writers to 
the study of literature. Prerequisite: At least 12 hours credit in Latin at the 200 
level or the equivalent. 

382. Roman Rhetoric. 4 hours. Required for all Latin majors. The contributions of 
writers in Latin to the study and practice of rhetoric. Prerequisite: At least 12 
hours credit in Latin or the equivalent. 

390. The Teaching of Latin in the Secondary School. 4 hours. Theory and practice in 
foreign language instruction as they apply specifically to teaching Latin at the 
secondary level; objectives of instruction in Latin, historical perspectives, texts 
and materials of instruction; preprofessional orientation. Prerequisite: At least 8 
hours of credit in Latin at the 300 level or approval of the department. 

LINGUISTICS 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

315. Introduction to Linguistics. 4 hours. Introduction to theories of the syntactic, 
morphological, and phonological analysis and description of language. Prerequi- 
site: 12 hours in English. 

354. The Psychology of Language. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 354 and Speech and 
Theater 354. Introductory survey of methods, theory, and research; acquaints 
students with the history and present status of psychology's interest in language 
behavior. 

380. Problems in Linguistic Analysis. 4 hours. Same as Anthroplogy 380. Examination 
of the methods and techniques used in linguistics, with reference to actual 
language data; emphasis on anthropological applications. Prerequisite: Anth. 280 
or Ling. 315. 



192 LINGUISTICS 



383. Teaching English as a Second Language. 4 hours. Same as Education 383 and 
English 383. The methodology of teaching English to residents of the United 
States who do not speak the language, especially Spanish-Americans. A brief 
description of the structure of American English, methods of teaching each aspect 
of its structure, various teaching devices and aids, special problems that may arise, 
and an examination of various texts. Prerequisite: Ling. 315. 

387. The Structure of English. 4 hours. Critical evaluation of traditional and 
structuralist grammatical descriptions; introduction to transformational grammati- 
cal studies; detailed survey of a transformational syntax of English; brief 
introduction to generative phonology and morphophonemic analysis of English, 
especially stress. Prerequisite: Engl. 301 or Ling. 315. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

401. Experimental Psycholinguistics. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 401 and Speech and 
Theater 401. Intensive review of experimental laboratory studies concerned with 
the effects of phonological, syntactic, and semantic variables on sentence 
perception, comprehension, production, and memory in the mature language user. 
The relevance of the research in contemporary psycholinguistic theory is 
emphasized. Prerequisite: Ling. 354. 

427. Developmental Psycholinguistics. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 427. Theoretical 
formulation, research methods, and research findings in the area of language 
development. Biological foundations and environmental influences; disorders of 
language development. Prerequisite: Ling. 354. 

451. Phonetics and Phonemics. 4 hours. Introduction to articulatory phonetics and 
phonemic analysis. Detailed treatment of English phonemics. Practice in 
transcription of utterances from English and other languages. Prerequisite: Credit 
or concurrent registration in Ling. 315. 

452. Applied English Linguistics I. 4 hours. Applications of linguistic science to the 
teaching of English syntax and grammar. Prerequisite: Ling. 387. 

453. Applied English Linguistics II. 4 hours. Applications of linguistic science to 
problems of style, rhetoric, and metrics. Emphasis on the literary implications of 
linguistic knowledge. Prerequisite: Ling. 387. 

454. Linguistics and Language Learning. 4 hours. Applications of linguistic science to 
the teaching of foreign languages. Development of comparative descriptions. 

455. Introduction to Indo-European Studies. 4 hours. History of Indo-European 
studies; dialects of Indo-European; methodology of comparative and historical 
linguistics and its application to the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European; 
current theories and problems of Proto-Indo-European phonology, morphology, 
and syntax. Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French or German. 



LINGUISTICS 193 



460. Comparative Linguistics. 4 hours. Introduction to diachronic linguistics and 
historical methods. 

461. Linguistic Analysis. 4 hours. Bases of grammatical analysis, including phonology, 
syntax, and morphophonemics. Prerequisite: Ling. 387. 

462. Field Methods in Linguistics. 4 hours. Recording and analysis of a language by 
means of native information. Prerequisite: Ling. 451. 

463. Dialectology. 4 hours. Description and mapping of dialects, both synchronically 
and diachronically. Methods of dialect geography. Prerequisite: Ling. 451. 

464. Lexicography. 4 hours. Survey and critical evaluation of current methods and 
procedures in dictionary writing; practical applications. 

465. History of Linguistic Science. 4 hours. Development of linguistic thought from its 
historical beginnings to the present. Prerequisite: Ling. 315. 

466. Morphology. 4 hours. Introduction to the principles of morphological theory, 
including word formation. Consideration of the various possible approaches to 
morphological analysis and the historical evolution of the concept. Prerequisites: 
Ling. 315 and 451. 

467. Syntax. 4 hours. Introduction to the methods of syntactic analysis as applied to 
English and other languages, both Indo-European and non-Indo-European. 
Prerequisite: Ling. 466. 

468. Physiological and Acoustic Phonetics. 4 hours. Same as Speech and Theater 468. 
Theories of physiological phonetics. The acoustics of speech. Acoustic bases for 
analysis, description, and classification of the sounds of languages. Prerequisite: 
Ling. 451. 

469. Topics in Phonology. 4 hours. Same as Speech and Theater 469. Contemporary 
theories of phonology: the nature of sound systems of languages; methods of 
investigating and describing such systems. Prerequisite: Ling. 451. 

470. Language Typology. 4 hours. Introduction to the history and methods of 
language typology from the nineteenth-century German Romantic philosophy 
(Wilhelm von Humboldt) through the early Indo-Europeanists and Edward Sapir 
to Greenberg's quantitative approach. Syntactic, lexicographic, and semantic 
typologies explored in addition to the traditional phonological and morphological 
ones. Prerequisites: Ling. 315 and 387 or the equivalents. 

471. Semantics. 4 hours. Introduction to the history and methods of semantics from 
the nineteenth-century French positivist Michel Breal through the works of 
Wittgenstein, Bertrand Russell, and Korzibsky, to modern works of Roger and 
Brown, Ulman, Wells, Weinreich, Lyons, Ziff, Katz and Fodor, and Lamb. The 
different schools of semantic analysis are discussed and evaluated. Prerequisites: 
Ling. 301 or the equivalent and Ling. 315. 



194 MANAGEMENT 



475. Introduction to Computational Linguistics. 4 hours. Introduction to the aims and 
methods of computer-aided linguistic analysis. Explanation of the basic workings 
of a computer; discussion of the nature of computer languages. Investigation of 
the ways a computer can be used to solve linguistic problems in the areas of 
phonology, morphology, syntax, translation, and lexicostatistics. Will include 
some actual work with the computer. No programming experience is required. 
Prerequisite: Ling. 315 or the equivalent. 

476. Contemporary Movements in Linguistic Theory I: Advanced Structuralism and 
Tagmemics. 4 hours. Analyzes and critically evaluates the theoretical contribu- 
tions and descriptive methods of structuralism and tagmemics. Prerequisites: Ling. 
465 and 467. 

477. Contemporary Movements in Linguistic Theory II: Advanced Transformational- 
Generative Grammar. 4 hours. Analyzes and critically evaluates the theoretical 
contributions and descriptive methods of transformational-generative grammar. 
Prerequisite: Ling. 476. 

478. Contemporary Movements in Linguistic Theory III: Advanced Glossematics and 
Stratificational Grammar. 4 hours. Analyzes and critically evaluates the theoret- 
ical contributions and descriptive methods of glossematics and stratificational 
grammar. Prerequisite: Ling. 477. 

480. Seminar in Sociolinguistics. 4 hours. Same as Anthropology 480. Past and current 
approaches to sociolinguistics; variations of linguistic structure with social 
structure among different linguistic groups. Prerequisite: Ling. 380. 



MANAGEMENT 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

330. Organizational Psychology. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 330. Individual 
psychological and group processes and their interaction with organizational 
structure. Behavioral factors in effective organizational change. Prerequisites: 
Psch. 230 and one course in social psychology or the equivalents. 

333. Motivation and Morale in Industry. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 333. Concepts 
and methods in the assessment and modification of employee motivation, 
attitudes, and morale. Prerequisite: 12 hours of psychology, including Psch. 332 
or the equivalent. 

335. Psychology of Industrial Training. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 335. Psychologi- 
cal measurement techniques in assessing training needs and evaluating training 
effectiveness. Application of psychological techniques to the development of 
industrial training programs. Prerequisite: Psch. 332 or the equivalent. 

338. Psychology of Industrial Conflict. 4 hours. Same as Psychology 338. Behavioral 
analysis of the causes, dimensions, and modes of resolution of industrial conflict; 
special emphasis on labor-management relations. Prerequisite: Psch. 330 or the 
equivalent. 



MANAGEMENT 195 



350. Organization and Administration. 4 hours. Theories of management; concepts of 
organization; major functions of management; fundamentals of decision making. 
Emphasis on the role of management and administration within the business firm. 
Prerequisite: QM 272. 

351. Organization Theory. 4 hours. Important theories of organization; their founda- 
tion, application, and consequences in the attainment of individual and 
organization objectives. Emphasis on formal and informal aspects of organiza- 
tions, authority relationships, and structural aspects. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 350. 

352. Administration Practices. 4 hours. Examination of executive and manager 
behavior in working organizations. Analysis of human problems and relationships 
at work. Leadership styles, problems of motivation and attitudes. Emphasis on 
behavioral science theory and technology as applied to business. Case method of 
analysis and study. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 351. 

353. Personnel Management. 4 hours. The foundation, history, and objectives of 
manpower management; motivation and supervision; selection, training, and 
discipline; union-management relations; wage-and-salary administration; personnel 
research. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 350. 

354. Industrial Relations Systems. 4 hours. Analysis of labor unions and their impact 
on business firms and society. Types of labor-management relationships and 
collective bargaining practices. Examination of public policy, union structure, and 
bargaining theory. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 353 or the equivalent. 

355. Operations and Systems Management I. 4 hours. Application of management 
sciences to planning and design of operational systems. Emphasis on strategic 
planning, selection of objectives, use of technological forecasts, responses to 
technological change and systems controls. Prerequisite: QM 272 or the 
equivalent. 

356. Operations and Systems Management II. 4 hours. Application of managerial 
sciences to operations and control of operational systems. Emphasis on systems 
operations facilities, systems standards and information flow, system mainte- 
nance, and the behavioral interface and system control. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 255 
or the equivalent. 

357. Operations and Systems Management III. 4 hours. Emerging concepts in 
management science. Managerial applications of computer technology and 
utilization and related electronic data processing. Applications of quantitative 
methods to information and control methods and systems. Process and systems 
design. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 356. 

358. Managerial Logistics. 4 hours. The management of all activities governing the 
physical flow of raw materials and finished goods through stages of production on 
to points of final consumption. Key areas considered include design of logistics 
systems, location theory, inventory control, and the use of mathematical 
techniques in solving problems of logistics managment. A logistics system 
computer simulation game is used. Prerequisites: Mgmt. 351 and Econ. 321. 



196 MANAGEMENT 



359. Business Policy. 4 hours. A capstone course that provides an understanding of the 
direction of business operations from the top-management point of view, rather 
than from the limited view of a particular functional-area specialist. By means of 
class discussion, written analysis of cases, and development of feasible plans of 
action, students gain experience in determining problem areas in company 
planning and management and in dealing successfully with a constantly changing 
business environment. Prerequisite: Completion of core requirements of the 
College of Business Administration. 

360. Business, Society, and Technology. 4 hours. Business and the corporate role in a 
complex, technological society. Emphasis on the historical evolution of business; 
the many relationships of the corporation to its external environment; urban 
problems of business; the impact of the corporation on individual and group 
behavior. Prerequisites: Econ. 322 or 323; Mgmt. 351. 

363. Collective Bargaining. 4 hours. Intensive examination of the structure and 
conduct of collective bargaining: the determination of the bargaining unit and 
bargaining representative; the negotiation and scope of contracts; the administra- 
tion of contracts; the major substantive issues in negotiations; the procedures for 
resolving industrial conflict. Prerequisites: Mgmt. 353 and 354. 

364. Labor Law and National Labor Policy. 4 hours. The evolution of national labor 
policy considered within a framework of labor legislation, court decisions, and 
administrative rules. Problems of effectuating labor agreements; problems of 
protecting individual employee rights in a collective bargaining context. Intro- 
duction to the legal and constitutional problems of government regulation of 
industrial and labor relations. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 354. 

366. Technological Forecasting. 4 hours. The methodology of forecasting the impact 
of technological change on the managerial process; emphasis on selection of goals 
and parameters, relevance of figures of merit and various forecasting methodolo- 
gies. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 355 or the equivalent. 

367. Impact of Technological Change. 4 hours. The impact of technological change on 
the business environment and the managerial process; emphasis on alternative 
futures and planning to attain desired ends. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 366. 

373. Collective Bargaining in Public Employment. 4 hours. Practices and legislation 
pertaining to union-management relations at the federal, state, and local levels of 
government. Procedural and policy issues confronting public employees, union 
officials, and government administrators. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 354. 

374. Comparative Industrial Relations Systems. 4 hours. Analysis of industrial relations 
structures, problems, and experiences among selected countries. Common and 
contrasting features of industrial relations systems are related to national 
economic, political, and social characteristics. Examination of the implication for 
management and economic development of differences among industrial relations 
systems. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 354. 

399. Independent Study. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated once for credit. Students in 
the College of Business Administration may register for this course to pursue 



MANAGEMENT 197 



advanced independent study in approved topics related to management. A written 
report prepared under .the guidance of a major professor is required. Prerequisites: 
16 hours of upper-division management courses and consent of the department 
head. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

451. Organization Theory. 4 hours. Classical and modern theories of organization. 
Organization structure and processes, line and staff relationships, management 
controls, managerial decision making, organizational objectives and restraints, 
management functions, formal and informal organization, bureaucracy, and 
behavioral science concepts. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 350. 

452. Administrative Practices. 4 hours. Analysis of human problems in management 
and organization. Dynamics of leadership in the working organization, group 
dynamics, administrative behavioral patterns, administrative implications of 
decision making and policy formulation, and other relevant behavioral science 
concepts. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 451. 

453. Personnel Management. 4 hours. Manpower management programs and policies. 
Staffing, training and development, historical evolution of personnel policies, 
modern labor force and technological trends, supervision, wage and salary 
administration, and manpower research and utilization. Prerequisites: Mgmt. 250 
or the equivalent, and 451. 

455. Operations and Systems Management. 4 hours. Basic principles and procedures for 
effective utilization of productive factors in a working organization. Facilities 
design, control systems, data processing, scheduling, automation, statistical 
analysis, computer technology, production planning, process design, and other 
relevant management science concepts. Prerequisites: QM 470 and 471. 

457. Seminar in International Business. 4 hours. Management practices and problems in 
major nations. Legal and cultural factors affecting managerial policies and 
decisions; organization planning and manpower utilization, comparative manage- 
ment systems and ideologies. Prerequisite: Mgmt. 451. 

458. Seminar in Business Policy and Decision Theory. 4 hours. To be taken in the final 
quarter of the student's degree program. A capstone course to integrate all the 
functional areas of business: policy formulation and administration, policy and 
decision implementation, long-range planning, control techniques, factor analysis 
and decision making, theories of decision making in an uncertain environment, 
quantitative techniques, simulation and case exercises, and study of actual 
business forms. 

459. Business and Society. 4 hours. Historical background of American business 
systems and institutions; conflicts between business and economic groups; 
problems of social groups seeking specified goals in a pluralistic society. 
Prerequisite: Mgmt. 350. 



198 MARKETING 



MARKETING 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

360. Principles of Marketing. 4 hours. Required of all students in the College of 
Business Administration. The workings of the marketing system and the way in 
which marketing decisions are made. 

361. Consumer Market Behavior. 4 hours. Motivations underlying market behavior of 
consumers, producers, middlemen; drives, emotions, desires, learning, memory; 
effects of demographic characteristics, social status, and reference groups on 
marketing action. Prerequisite: Mktg. 360. 

362. Marketing Research. 4 hours. Investigation of the gathering and interpretation of 
information used in solving marketing problems; pertinent modern research 
techniques from mathematics and the behavioral sciences are employed in 
developing an analytical structure. Prerequisites: Mktg. 361 and QM 172 or the 
equivalents. 

363. Marketing Organization. 4 hours. Principles underlying the development of an 
integrated distribution system; its relationship to the marketing structure of the 
firm; evaluation of decisions on raw-material sources, plant and warehouse 
location, wholesale and retail outlets; analysis of the movement of products 
through marketing channels. Prerequisite: Mktg. 362. 

364. Managing Marketing Communications. 4 hours. Analysis of communication 
information among producers, middlemen, and consumers for marketing pur- 
poses; managerial problems in directing a firm's promotional efforts; personal 
selling, advertising, sales promotion, public relations. Prerequisite: Mktg. 363. 

365. Marketing Management. 4 hours. Seminar. Building marketing programs to 
implement the achievement of marketing objectives. Individual and group 
research and presentation from the viewpoint of major marketing executives of 
the firm ; business case analysis. Prerequisite: Mktg. 364. 

366. Comparative Marketing Systems. 4 hours. An advanced course that treats 
domestic marketing systems and their structures and processes in a framework of 
comparative cultural, political, economic, and social systems. Prerequisite: Mktg. 
360. 

399. Special Topics in Marketing. 4 hours. Intensive study of selected problems. 
Reading assignments are drawn from scholarly and professional journals; emphasis 
on covering relatively few areas in great depth. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

400. Principles of Marketing. 4 hours. Theory and practice in the formulation of 
marketing decisions; planning, pricing, and promotion; distribution of goods and 
services to all types of consumers. 



MUSIC 199 



460. Marketing Management. 4 hours. The structural system for the management of 
marketing; environmental considerations; goal determination; the sequential 
process; marketing planning; product-market integration; channel components; 
demand stimulation; evaluation and audit. Prerequisite: Mktg. 400. 

461. Consumer Behavior. 4 hours. Application of knowledge from the behavioral 
sciences to the study of consumer behavior. Individual, group, and cultural 
influences on consumer preferences and purchasing patterns. Emphasis on both 
theory and application; examination of the advantages and limitations of this 
approach to consumer behavior. Prerequisite: Mktg. 460. 

463. Information for Marketing Decisions. 4 hours. Problem definition and the 
selection of appropriate research techniques for the solution of specific marketing 
problems; design of the research project, administration of research, and special 
problems in marketing research. The establishment and administration of 
information systems to provide the firm with a systematic, continuing appraisal of 
its market position. Prerequisite: Mktg. 461. 

465. Marketing Communication and Promotional Strategy. 4 hours. The ways in which 
a firm uses advertising, public relations, sales promotion, and personal selling to 
communicate with its customers. The functional characteristics of each of these is 
assessed in terms of varying marketing situations in the process of formulating the 
firm's strategy. Prerequisite: Mktg. 463. 



MUSIC 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

300. Sixteenth Century Counterpoint. 3 hours. Late Renaissance music. Analysis of 
representative scores and written assignments in sixteenth century contrapuntal 
style. Prerequisites: Mus. 203 and 206 or approval of the department. 

301. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint. 3 hours. Middle-to-late Baroque music. 
Analysis of representative scores and written assignments in eighteenth century 
contrapuntal style. Prerequisite: Mus. 300 or approval of the department. 

302. Form and Analysis. 3 hours. The melodic, rhythmic, harmonic, and structural 
analytic procedures of traditional musical form. Analysis of representative scores 
from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Mus. 301. 

303. Compositional Techniques of the Twentieth Century. 4 hours. European and 
American twentieth century music. Analysis of representative scores and written 
assignments in composition in one or more of the several contemporary idioms. 
Prerequisite: Mus. 302. 

320. Proseminar in Music. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 
1 2 hours. Selected topics for intensive study in specialized areas of musicology or 
music theory. 



200 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



330. Music as Experience. 4 hours. The musical experience as found in the writings of 
theorists, composers, musicians, historians, critics, and philosophers. Prerequi- 
sites: Mus. 130 and one 200-level course in music. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

300. Administrative Theory and Practice in Physical Education. 4 hours. A theoretical 
approach to the development of administrative thought as it relates to physical 
education; emphasis on the understanding of concepts and models from the social 
sciences and their implications for leadership in the educational setting; 
development of a personal philosophy of administration. Prerequisite: PEM 260 
or PEW 250. 

301. Evaluation in Physical Education. 4 hours. The availability and value of evaluative 
tools in physical education; methods for administration of evaluative techniques; 
analysis of interpretation and use of the results from evaluative techniques; 
description of the construction of new evaluative instruments employed in 
physical education. Prerequisite: PEM 253 or PEW 205. 

302. Synthesis of Human Movement Concepts. 4 hours. Integration of selected 
concepts from biomechanics, exercise physiology, psychology, and sociology as 
they apply to the development of meaningful human movement. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

303. Instructional Techniques in Physical Education. 4 hours. Theory and practice; 
special emphasis on the application of motor learning research to instructional 
techniques and teaching styles. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

305. Special Projects in Physical Education. 2 to 4 hours. Independent research on 
special projects. Prerequisite: Approval of the student's project by a graduate 
faculty member. 

306. The Sport and Play of America. 4 hours. The creation, importation, and 
derivation of sport and play in America; course of development and adaptation to 
the nature of American life; impact of the political, economic, cultural, and 
geographical scene on the character of sport and play. Special emphasis on sport 
and play in urban America. Prerequisite: History of physical education and/or 
sport. 

313. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education. 4 hours. Principles of curriculum 
development and evaluation for physical education; analysis of age characteristics, 
needs, interests, and goals of students in a variety of community settings and their 
implication for the curriculum; development of psycho-motor behavioral objec- 
tives for curricular offerings for various learning groups. Prerequisite: Ed. 230. 



QUANTITATIVE METHODS 201 

QUANTITATIVE METHODS 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

370. Multivariate Analysis. 4 hours. Theory and application of sampling from 
multivariate normal populations. Topics include such multivariate methods as 
multilinear regression, canonical correlation; analysis of variance and covariance; 
discriminant functions, structure of multivariate observations, both principal 
components and factor analysis. Prerequisites: QM 272, Math. 194 or 195, and 
Math. 348. 

371. Survey Research. 4 hours. Application of sampling theory and methods to 
planning, conducting, and evaluating surveys for measuring public opinion, 
consumer attitudes and preferences. Instruments of measurement, sample design 
estimation, sources of errors and bias. Case studies with application to actual 
situations. Prerequisite: QM 272 or the equivalent. 

375. Information Systems. 4 hours. An introduction to the theory and concepts of 
systems, including classification, deterministic and probabilistic models, Markov 
processes and Monte Carlo techniques, simulation. Introduction to the models as 
related to the computer; types of programming; experimentation and evaluation. 
Prerequisite: QM 272. Mathematics 194 or 195 is recommended. 

376. Survey of Operations Research. 4 hours. Methods, techniques, and applications; 
linear programm hg, simulation, production and inventory theory, queuing 
theory, game theory. Prerequisites: QM 272 and Math. 112. 

378. Dynamic Programming. 4 hours. Theory and application to solving problems in 
multistage decision processes arising in a wide variety of fields, such as operations 
research, engineering, and mathematics. Deterministic and random processes are 
considered, and computational and analytical methods of solution derived. 
Prerequisites: Math. 133 and 220 or the equivalents. 

Courses for Graduate Students 

470. Mathematical Methods I. 4 hours. Designed primarily to introduce and/or review 
areas of mathematics necessary for the development and understanding of the 
analytic tools students will encounter in subsequent courses of a Master in 
Business Administration program. Elementary set theory; mathematical functions; 
introduction to probability concepts; differential and integral calculus; series; 
functions of several variables. Prerequisites: Math. 110, 111, 112; QM 270, 271, 
272. 

471. Mathematical Methods II. 4 hours. Sets and set functions; vector and matrix 
algebra; introduction to linear programming and game theory. At least one hour 
per week of laboratory in the use and application of digital computers and 
development in computer technology applicable to modern business operations. 
Prerequisites: Math. 110, 111, 112;QM 270, 271, and 272. 



202 RUSSIAN 



472. Statistics, Theory, and Applications. 4 hours. Statistics and scientific method; 
uncertainty and probability, including Bayesian theory; binomial normal, t, Chi 
square, and F distributions; testing hypotheses and estimation; decision theory; 
analysis of variance, including regression and correlation; times series. Prerequi- 
sites: Math. 110, 111, 112; QM 270, 271, and 272. 

473. Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design. 4 hours. General theory of design 
and analysis of experiments. Least squares estimation, multiple regression, 
analysis of variance, randomization, randomized blocks, Latin squares, factorial 
designs, replication, incomplete blocks. Prerequisite: QM 472. 

474. Statistical Decision Theory. 4 hours. Hypothesis testing from the classical and 
Bayesian viewpoints with applications of probability to the making of decisions; 
some treatment of game strategy and its parallels in decision making. Prerequisite: 
QM 472. 

475. Business Research and Forecasting. 4 hours. The role of research in business, 
forecasting methods and techniques, including models and their applications. 
Prerequisite: QM 472. 



RUSSIAN 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

320. Russian Poetry I. 4 hours. Major poets from 1700 to 1840: Kantemir, 
Trediakovskij, Lomonosov, Sumarokov, Derzhavin, Fonvizin, Krylov, Pushkin, 
and others. Readings in Russian, discussion in English. Prerequisite: 24 hours of 
Russian. 

321. Russian Poetry II. 4 hours. Major poets from 1840 to the 1890's: Zukovskij, 
Batjuskov, Gnedic, Katenin, Odoevskij, Lermontov, Nekrasov, Plesceev, Tjutcev, 
Fet, and others. Readings in Russian, discussion in English. Prerequisite: 24 hours 
of Russian. 

322. Russian Poetry III. 4 hours. Major poets from the 1890's to the present: 
Merezkovskij, Bal'mont, Sologub, Belyj, Blok, Axmatova, Mandel'stam, Esenin, 
Majakovskij, Pasternak, Tixonov, Simonov, Evtusenko, Voznesenskij, Rozdestven- 
skij, and others. Readings in Russian, discussion in English. Prerequisite: 24 hours 
of Russian. 

324. Studies in Russian Literary Criticism. 4 hours. Belinskij, Chernishevskij, Herzen, 
Dobrolyubov, Pisarev, L.N. Tolstoy. Prerequisite: Russ. 224. 

332. Grammar for Teachers. 4 hours. Intensive study and review of problems of 
Russian grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: Russ. 201. 

350. Russian Novel I. 4 hours. Historical and critical study of the development of the 
Russian novel from 1800 to about 1860: Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Goncharov, 
Aksakov, Chernishevsky. 



SPANISH 203 



351. Russian Novel II. 4 hours. Continues Russian 350. Development from 1860 to 
about 1900: Turgenev, Alexey Tolstoy, Saltykov, Shchedrin, Lev Tolstoy, 
Dostoevsky, Leskov. 

352. Russian Novel III. 4 hours. Continues Russian 351. Development from 1900 to 
the present: Gorkii, Sologub, Zamiatin, Fedin, Leonov, Pilniak, N. Ostrovskii, 
Sholokhov, A.N. Tolstoi, Ehrenburg, Dudintsev, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Solzhen- 
itsyn. Prerequisite: 12 hours of Russian. 

360. Survey of Russian Drama. 4 hours. Major authors from the beginning of the 
Enlightenment to the end of the nineteenth century: Sumarokov, Fonvinzin, 
Ozerov, Griboyedov, Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Ostrovsky, A. Tolstoy, L. 
Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gorky. Prerequisite: Russ. 224 or Spch. 122. 



SPANISH 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

301. Contemporary Spanish Poetry. 4 hours. From Modernism to the present. 
Readings and interpretation of the works of some of the best known poets of the 
period. Prerequisite: Span. 219 or 221. 

302. Contemporary Spanish Theater. 4 hours. Plays of some of the best known 
contemporary authors, from Benavente to Sastre. Prerequisite: Span. 219 or 221. 

303. Nineteenth Century Spanish Non-Romantic Drama. 4 hours. Representative 
outlines of non-Romantic plays, their characteristics and development. Prerequi- 
site: Span. 219 or 221. 

305. Spanish Romanticism. 4 hours. Representative works of the Romantic period; 
particular emphasis on romantic drama and poetry. Prerequisite: Span. 219 or 
221. 

306. Realism in Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature. 4 hours. Continues Spanish 
305. Prerequisite: Span. 219 or 221. 

307. The Generation of 1898. 4 hours. Representative works of Baroja, Azorin, 
Unamuno, Maeztu, Valle Inclan, Benavente, A. Machado, and others. Prerequisite: 
Span. 219 or 221. 

308. Spanish-American Literature to 1888 I. 4 hours. Development from the sixteenth 
century through the end of the Romantic period. Prerequisite: Span. 223 or 224 
or the equivalent. 

309. Spanish-American Literature to 1888 II. 4 hours. Continues Spanish 308. 
Prerequisite: Span. 223 or 224. 

310. Modernismo and Contemporary Spanish -American Poetry. 4 hours. Spanish- 
American poetry from 1888 to the present, with some Modernista prose. 
Prerequisite: Span. 223 or 224. 



204 SPANISH 



311. Modernismo and Contemporary Spanish-American Poetry. 4 hours. Continues 
Spanish 310. Prerequisite: Span. 223 or 224. 

314. Poetry of the Golden Age. 4 hours. The development of Spanish lyric poetry out 
of both popular and classical sources. Romances, Renaissance poetry, mystic 
poetry, culturanismo , and cone eptismo. Prerequisite: Span. 218. 

315. Drama of the Golden Age. 4 hours. Development of Spanish theater in the Golden 
Age; detailed study of plays by Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderon, and 
other representative dramatists. Prerequisite: Span. 218. 

317. Prose of the Golden Age. 4 hours. Major examples of picaresque, pastoral, and 
chivalric forms. Prerequisite: Span. 218. 

318. Minor Works of Cervantes. 4 hours. The prose of Cervantes and its relationship to 
his masterpiece. Prerequisite: Span. 218. 

319. Don Quijote. 4 hours. Reading and discussion; emphasis on novelistic technique 
and development of the novel. Prerequisite: Span. 218. 

320. The Contemporary Spanish Novel. 4 hours. The novel as it has developed since 
1936. Prerequisite: Span. 219 or 221. 

321. The Contemporary Spanish Novel. 4 hours. Continues Spanish 320. Prerequisite: 
Span. 219 or 221. 

323. The Contemporary Spanish- American Novel I. 4 hours. From the Romantic 
period to 1930. Prerequisite: Span. 224 or the equivalent. 

324. The Contemporary Spanish-American Novel II. 4 hours. Continues Spanish 323. 
From 1930 to the present. Prerequisite: Span. 223 or 224. 

340. History of the Spanish Language. 4 hours. General survey of the development of 
the Spanish language. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

342. Introduction to Romance Philology. 4 hours. History of the Romance languages, 
especially Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese, from the classical Latin period 
to the present; their external history, phonology, morphology, and syntax. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

345. Medieval Spanish Literature. 4 hours. Important works from the beginnings to 
1400. Prerequisite: Span. 218. Spanish 340 is recommended. 

346. Medieval Spanish Literature. 4 hours. Important works of the fifteenth century. 
Prerequisite: Span. 218. Spanish 340 is recommended. 

349. Phonetics. 4 hours. Prerequisites: Span. 213, and 218 or 221. 

371. Spanish for Teachers. 4 hours. Consideration of those language problems 
suggested by teaching experience. It is recommended that this course be taken 



SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 205 



after student teaching, in the last quarter before graduation. Also open to 
experienced teachers. • Prerequisite: Student teaching or professional teaching 
experience. 

390. Topics in Spanish Literature. 6 hours. May be repeated. Topics vary from quarter 
to quarter. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

399. Independent Study. 1 to 6 hours. Supervised study in an area not covered by 
regularly offered courses, under the direction of a faculty member designated at 
the discretion of the department on the request of a qualified student. Individual 
conferences, assigned readings and papers, and other work are required. 
Prerequisites: Spanish major or graduate student in Spanish with senior standing 
and approval of the department. 

Courses for Graduate Students 

407. Seminar: Galdos. 6 hours. Individual conferences on course papers are required. 
Detailed study of Galdos' novelistic art; emphasis on Fortunata y Jacinta and 
other works illustrative of his major periods. Prerequisite: Span. 306. 

440. The Spanish Renaissance. 6 hours. Social, cultural, and intellectual characteristics; 
main periods and aspects in relation to typical authors and works from 1450 to 
1600. Prerequisite: At least two of the following courses: Span. 314, 315, 317, 
318, 319,345, 346. 



SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 

Courses for Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students 

307. Cybernetics I. 4 hours. Same as Information Engineering 307. Introduction to 
artificial intelligence and pattern recognition by computer. Programs for playing 
games, proving theorems, answering questions, and making medical diagnosis. 
Property selection and decisionmaking techniques. Prerequisites: Math. 195 and 
either 250 or 370. 

311. Introduction to Systems Analysis I. 4 hours. Mathematical modeling of systems 
described by ordinary differential equations, including electrical, mechanical, 
economic, ecological, industrial, and others. Fundamental laws describing 
generalized system elements. Topological consequences of element intercon- 
nections and solutions for elementary topologies using computer methods. 
Prerequisites: Math. 195 and InfE. 210. 

312. Introduction to Systems Analysis II. 4 hours. Continues Systems Engineering 311. 
Lagrange's methods of deriving generalized system equations. Analysis of 
multiloop topologies using vector matrix forms. Solution of the general linear 
system using Laplace transforms and computer techniques. Prerequisite: SysE. 
311. 

313. Introduction to Systems Analysis III. 4 hours. Continues Systems Engineering 
312. Feedback, stability, and frequency characteristics of generalized linear 



206 SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 



systems. Matrix transfer function forms for interacting systems. Introduction to 
nonlinear generalized systems. Prerequisite: SysE. 312. 

321. Distributed Systems Analysis. 4 hours. Analysis of linear, one and two-dimen- 
sional distributed parameter systems arising in engineering, economics, industry, 
and transportation type systems. Equations of motion are derived from 
elementary differential models and analyzed using analytic and simulation 
techniques. Prerequisite: SysE. 311 or the equivalent. 

325. Nonlinear Systems Analysis. 4 hours. Analysis of inherently and/or topologically 
nonlinear models arising in engineering, economic, and ecological systems. Energy 
methods are used to reduce topology to a state space model which is then 
analyzed using classical and computer aided techniques. Prerequisite: SysE. 313 
or the equivalent. 

326. Discrete Systems Analysis. 4 hours. Analysis of the equations of motion of 
physical system models using finite difference forms. Lumped linear and 
nonlinear systems are emphasized but, where applicable, method is extended to 
distributed systems. Prerequisite: SysE. 313 or the equivalent. 

330. Transportation Systems Analysis II. 3 hours. Examination of technological 
components and relationships affecting the performance of transportation 
systems; integrated analysis of system performance and its effects on the 
economic, political, and psychological aspects of human activities. Prerequisites: 
SysE. 230 and credit or registration in Econ. 120. 



331. Transportation Systems Engineering. 3 hours. Examination of fundamental 
physical relationships governing the operation and design of transportation 
systems and their components; general and specific function of component 
specifications and system design, function of component specificaitons and 
system design. Prerequisites: SysE. 330 and MatE. 102 or Phys. 111. 

332. Transportation Systems Planning. 3 hours. Philosophies, strategies, and specific 
analytical techniques for planning large transportation systems; analysis and 
critique of contemporary institutional structures and models used for transporta- 
tion planning; general and specific methods of forecasting future needs, 
developing plans, and evaluating alternatives; application of various techniques to 
practical transportation planning problems. Prerequisite: SysE. 330. 

340. Analysis and Design of Systems I. 4 hours. Open to a limited number of advanced 
undergraduate and graduate social science students. Introduction to strategic and 
tactical procedures for applying a variety of analytic techniques to large-scale 
systems; emphasis on the interaction of these systems with society. In addition to 
readings, lectures, and discussions, student teams undertake comprehensive design 
projects to gain realistic experience with analysis and design procedures. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. For social science students; senior 
standing in their fields, background in algebra, geometry, and calculus equivalent 
to Math. 110 through 112, and consent of the instructor. 



SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 207 



350. Stochastic Processes. 4 hours. Analysis of probabilistic systems; the theory of 
games and decisions; recurrent event models, Markov processes, and queuing 
systems; digital computer simulation of stochastic processes; applications to 
specific engineering systems. Prerequisite: Math. 370. 

352. Experimental Design. 4 hours. Review of fundamental concepts of statistical 
analysis. Introduction to standard experimental designs and their associated 
application in the statistical interpretation of research data and design of 
engineering systems. Completely random designs, randomized block designs, Latin 
squares, covariance analysis, and factorial experiments. 

355. Urban Systems Analysis II. 3 hours. Introduction to the analysis of dynamic 
urban systems; urban process analysis; modeling of growth and development 
processes; studies of decentralized and centralized decisional systems; quantitative 
analysis techniques for modeling; evaluating the performance of existing and 
planned urban and regional systems and components; analysis and evaluation of 
technologically based regional policies. Prerequisites: SysE. 240 and credit or 
registration in Econ. 1 20. 

356. Urban Systems Planning. 3 hours. Introduction to philosophies, theories, 
strategies, and techniques of urban systems planning; studies of urban value 
systems and the development of operational planning objectives; planning 
information systems, data collection and analysis; predictive model development; 
plan design methods; analysis of resources allocation; plan testing and evaluation; 
application of specific techniques to laboratory problems. Prerequisites: Econ. 
120, SysE. 355. 

360. Traffic Flow and Control Systems. 3 hours. Introduction to particular flow 
systems; investigation of microscopic flow relations and their effect on macro- 
scopic flow properties; generalized study of traffic control systems; integrated 
investigation of flow properties, control systems, and system safety characteris- 
tics; applications to highway and air traffic flow. Laboratory work in data 
collection, analysis, and simulation studies. Prerequisites: Math. 195, 370. 

361. Evaluation of Engineering Systems. 2 hours. Strategies and techniques for 
evaluating complex urban and transportation systems; discussion of public works 
investment-decision processes and the role of the engineer; economic, social, 
psychological, and political analysis of major engineering systems; market studies 
and simulation techniques; cost-effectiveness studies and program budgeting 
systems. Prerequisites: Econ. 120, SysE. 230 or 240. 

371. Optimization Techniques I. 4 hours. Linear programming models, Simplex 
method, sensitivity analysis, transportation problems, duality. Nonlinear program- 
ming models, separable objective function, geometric programming, Kuhn-Tucker 
equations, quadratic programming. Prerequisites: Math. 195 and 220. 

372. Optimization Techniques II. 4 hours. Dynamic programming. Optimal control 
theory; Bellman, Hamilton-Jacob i, and Euler-Lagrange eq ations; Pontryagin's 
maximum principle. Search techniques, golden mean and Fibonacci search, 
gradient approach, stochastic approximation. Prerequisite: SysE. 371. 



208 SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 



380. Quantitative Methods in Urban Engineering. 3 hours. Theory and application of 
fundamental statistical and mathematical techniques of measurement and data 
analysis for urban systems engineering; presentation and critical review of selected 
quantitative methods appropriate to identifying problems, establishing design 
standards and evaluating the performance of urban engineering systems. 
Prerequisites: Math. 195, 370, and SysE. 230 or 240. 

381. Projects in Urban Systems Engineering. 2 hours. Analytical and experimental 
projects in urban systems engineering and planning. Prerequisites: SysE. 380 and 
credit or registration in SysE. 350. 

391. Seminar. 1 to 4 hours. May be repeated. Topics to be arranged. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

393. Special Problems. 2 to 4 hours. Special problems or reading by arrangement with 
the faculty. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



Courses for Graduate Students 

411. Systems Theory I. 4 hours. Linear systems theory: state equations formulation, 
transform methods, structural properties, stability, observability, and controlla- 
bility. Linear stochastic systems. Prerequisites: SysE. 313 and 370. 

412. Systems Theory II. 4 hours. General systems theory: observability, controlla- 
bility, and stability for systems described by nonlinear, partial and differential- 
difference equations. Prerequisites: SysE. 321, 325, 326, and 411. 

413. Differential Games and Applications. 4 hours. Differential game theory as applied 
to mathematical models of socioeconomic and urban type systems. Optimal 
strategies are obtained as functions of the state variables, and computer 
simulations are used to determine optimal trajectories. Prerequisites: SysE. 372 
and 412. 

440. Analysis and Design of Systems II. 4 hours. Continues Systems Engineering 340. 
Detailed studies of strategies and tactics for analyzing and designing large-scale, 
complex engineering systems. Student teams formulate and exercise analytic and 
predictive models of engineering systems and their interaction with their 
environments. Prerequisite: SysE. 340. 

450. Applied Stochastic Processes. 4 hours. The stochastic nature of queues, 
inventories, and engineering reliability. Comprehensive analysis of queueing 
systems, Markov chains, and inventory models; engineering analysis of reliability 
problems. Prerequisite: SysE. 350. 

451. Decision Theory. 4 hours. Introduction to the mathematical analysis of decision 
making when the state of the world is uncertain but further information about it 
can be obtained by experimentation. Formal consideration of the decision 
maker's knowledge about the application; utility theory. Relation between 
Bayesian and traditional statistical decision theory. Prerequisite: SysE. 350. 



SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 209 



455. Urban Information Systems. 4 hours. The fundamental informational bases of 
urban system and subsystem structure, operations, and decision and control; 
cybernetic urban models, functional aspects of information systems, and 
operational examples of formalized systems; design of specialized planning 
information systems, including the establishment and fulfillment of information 
requirements. Prerequisite: SysE. 356. 

460. Theory of Transportation Networks. 4 hours. Establishment of a mathematical 
basis for network flows and the relation of this basis to combinatorial analysis and 
graph theory. Consideration of static and dynamic maximal flows, multi- terminal 
flows, and multi-commodity flows. Application of these techniques to such other 
problems as the trim problem, the warehousing problem, and the allocation- 
location problem. Prerequisites: SysE. 332 and 372. 

471. Mathematical Programming in Industrial Systems. 4 hours. Consideration of 
mathematical programming as applied to functional areas of business and 
industry; review of status of operations research in major industries. Prerequisite: 
SysE. 372. 

472. Stochastic Optimization. 4 hours. Development of algorithms which optimize 
mathematical models involving random variables for coefficients and/or restric- 
tions. Consideration of changes mecessary in linear programming and dynamic 
programming methods that allow handling of stochastic problems. Effect of 
underlying stochastic processes on nature of solution. Prerequisites: SysE. 350 
and 372. 

475. Seminar in Advanced Topics in Optimization. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated. 
In-depth treatment of individual optimization techniques; emphasis on current 
research. Topics for each quarter will be announced. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

495. Individual Research. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 1 2 hours. 
Research on special problems not included in graduate- the sis. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

498. Seminar in Systems Engineering. 2 to 4 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 
12 hours. Systematic treatment of special topics; emphasis on current research. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

499. Graduate Thesis. to 16 hours. May be repeated. Thesis work under the 
supervision of a graduate adviser. Prerequisite: Consent of the adviser. 



ADDITIONAL FACULTY OF THE GRADUATE COLLEGE 

The following faculty have graduate standing and teach in departments 
that presently offer graduate-level courses but not graduate degrees. 

Gyan C. Agarwal, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Systems Engineering 
Rene Amon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Architecture 
Basil T. Argeropolus, Instructor in Art 
Eliezer B. Ayal, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Jean H. Baer, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Hale C. Bartlett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management 

Bernard H. Baum, Ph.D., Professor of Management 

Amin Beck, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

Leon Bellin, M.A., Associate Professor of Art 

Edmund Bender, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French 

Violet Bergquist, M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish 

Nancy D. Berryman, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Art 

Eduardo Betoret-Paris, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish 

Manuel Bianco-Gonzalez, M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish 

Alvin S. Boyarsky, M.R.P., Professor of Architecture 

Joseph Braga, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

Lucille V. Braun, Assistant Professor of Spanish 

George Bugliarello, Sc.D., Professor of Systems Engineering 

Patricia S. Charlier, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 
Priscilla P. Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French 
Edwin Cohen, Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting 
Yehoshua S. Cohen, M.A., Instructor in Geography 
James D. Compton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Peter V. Conroy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French 
Leonard J. Currie, M.Arch., Professor of Architecture 
Alden D. Cutshall, Ph.D., Professor of Geography 

Dragomir V. Davidovich, Ph.D., Professor of Criminal Justice 

Edward L. Deam, M.Arch., Professor of Architecture 

Horst de la Croix, Ph.D., Professor of History of Architecture and Art 

Lucile Derrick, Ph.D., Professor of Quantitative Analysis 

Rheta De Vries, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

Edwin H. Draine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography 

Elliott Dudnik, M.S.C.E., Professor of Architecture 

Brian Dutton, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

Maurice Eash, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

Ruth Elsaffar, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Bert E. Elwert, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics and Management 

Frederick D. Erickson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

210 



Lawrence P. Feldman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing 
Mildred 1. Finney, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography 
Sheldon L. Fordham, Ed.D., Professor of Physical Educat.on for Men 
Samuel Fox, Ph D., Professor of Accounting 

Charles B. Genther, B.S., Lecturer in Architecture 

Robert W. Gerstner, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture 

George C.Giles, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

Dorothy F. Gillanders, Ed.D., Professor of Physical Education for Women 

Roland F. Ginzel, M.F.A., Professor of Art 

Brian Gluss, Ph.D., Professor of Quantitative Methods 

William D. Grampp, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Andrew Greeley, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Peter W. Gygax, Dipl. Arch., Associate Professor of Architecture 

Robert E. Hallowell, Ph.D., Professor of French 

Donald D. Hanson, M.Arch., Professor of Architecture 

Helen M. Heitmann, D.P.E., Professor of Physical Education for Women 

George A. Hinds, M.C.P., Professor of Architecture 

S. George Huneryager, Ph.D., Professor of Management 

Martin Hurtig, M.S., Professor of Art 

Ronald Jablonski, D.B.A., Associate Professor of Management 

Joseph Jachna, M.S., Assistant Professor of Art 

Jerald W. Jackard, M.A., Associate Professor of Art 

T Robert Jaeger, M.Arch., Associate Professor of Architecture 

Thomas M.Johnson, J.D., Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Milan R. Kaderavek, D.M.A., Associate Professor of Music 

William M. Kaplan, D.M.A., Associate Professor of Music 

Hinman L. Kealy, M.C.P., Associate Professor of Architecture 

Leonard D. Kent, Ph.D., Professor of Quantitative Methods 

Howard F. Koeper, Ph.D., Professor of History of Architecture and Art 

Richard Koppe, Professor of Art 

Richard F. Kosobud, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Eliezer Krumbein, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

Carol LaBranche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Architecture and Art 
Albert J. Larson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography 
Marie E. Lein, Ph.D., Professor of French 
Charles M. Lombard, Ph.D., Professor of French 

Charles Mader, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education 
Joseph J. Malinchoc, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education 
Alfonse Malinosky, M.B.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting 
Alfred P. Maurice, M.A., Professor of Art 

211 



Donald M. Mclntyre, L.L.D., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 

John D. McNee, M.A., Professor of History of Architecture and Art 

George Megarefs, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture 

Henry L. Mikolayczyk, M.Arch., Professor of Architecture 

Floyd G. Miller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Systems Engineering 

Barbara G. Mittman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French 

George Monroe, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

June Moravcevich, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French 

Nicholas Moravcevich, Ph.D., Professor of Comparative Literature 

Van Cleve Morris, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

Ronald P. Moses, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics 

Robert W. Nickle, B.A., Professor of Art 

Joseph Nicol, M.S., Professor of Criminal Justice 

Nancy L. Nihan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Systems Engineering 

Richard E. Norton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music 

Lawrence B. Oscai, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men 
James W. Osterburg, M.P.A., Visiting Professor of Criminal Justice 

Kenneth I. Perry, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Elizabeth Pribic, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Slavic Languages 

Jerry Rank, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Robert H. Ratcliffe, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

Victor E. Ricks, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Robert Rippey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

Louis Rocah, M.S., Associate Professor of Architecture 

Bradley L. Rothermel, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Education for Men 

Lalitha Sanathanan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Quantitative Methods 

Jose Sanchez, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

Samuel Sandler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Slavic Languages 

Hans K. Schaal, M.S., Assistant Professor of Art 

Stephen A. Schiller, J.D., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 

Mary J. Schlinger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marketing 

William M. Schuyler, Ph.D., Professor of French 

Madelaine M. Shalabi, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

Sol S. Shalit, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics 

Sherman Shapiro, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Leonard D. Singer, M.S., Assistant Professor of Art 

David M. Solzman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography 

Siim Soot, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography 

Houston H. Stokes, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics 

Frederick G. Stubbs, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Finance 

Roland Q. Swaim, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

Franklin P. Sweetser, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 

Marie-Odile Sweetser, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 

212 



Harriet Talmage, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

Charles A. Tesconi, Jr., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

Guenther Tetz, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art 

Dorothy R. Thelander, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 

Edwin N. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Geography 

Clifford E. Tiedemann, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography 

Larry L. Tifft, M.A., Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 

Stanley M. Tigerman, M.Arch., Professor of Architecture 

William W. Tongue, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Finance 

Judith Torney, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Nicholas J. Valenziano, M.M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Music 

Edward W. Walbridge, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Systems Engineering 

John E. Walley, Professor of Art 

John A. Webster, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 

Robert E. Weigand, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing 

Roger G. Whitmer, M.S., Associate Professor of Architecture 

Frederick P. Wiesinger, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture 



213 



Inde? 



Academic work loads for assistants, 23 

Accounting, courses in, 170 
Administration of criminal justice, 

courses in, 171 
Admission, 16 
Advanced Degrees 

time limitations for, 21 
Advisers, 21 
Anthropology, Department of, 11, 44 

admission requirements, 44 

courses, 45, 47 

degree requirements, 44 
Application procedures, 1 7 
Architecture, courses in, 173 
Art-Design, courses in, 174 
Assistantships, 35 
Auditing privileges, 23 

Bioengineering 11, 96, 175 
Biological Sciences, Department of, 

11,49 

admission requirements, 49 

courses, 50, 54 
Business law, courses in, 175 

Chemistry, Department of, 11, 58 

admission requirements, 59 

courses, 60, 62 

degree requirements 
Master of Science, 59 
Doctor of Philosophy, 60 
Computer Center, 40 
Counseling, educational vocational, 

personal, 42 
Course loads, 22 

Dean of Men, Dean of Women, 41 

Deferred-Fee charge, 31 
Degrees, regulations pertaining to 

Master's, 24 

Doctoral, 24 

Foreign language requirement for, 25 

Examinations, 25 

Thesis, 26 
Drop rules, 22 

Economics, courses in, 175 
Education, courses in, 177 
Employment, 38 



Energy Engineering, Department of, 
11,64 

courses, 66, 67 
degree requirements 
Master of Science, 65 
Doctor of Philosophy, 65 
English, Department of, 11, 71 
admission requirements, 71 
courses, 75, 79 
degree requirements, 
M.A. in English, 73 
in linguistics, 74 
Executive Committee of the Graduate 
College, 13 

Fees, 30 

Fellowship holders, 23 
Fellowships, 33 

University, 34 

industrial, endowed, and special, 34 
Finance, courses in, 180 
Foreign applicants, 1 7 
Foreign Student Affairs, Office of, 43 
French, courses in, 181 
Full-time study, minimum for, 23 

Geography, courses in, 185 
Geological Sciences, Department of, 

11,81 

admission requirements, 81 

courses, 82, 83 

degree requirements, 82 
German, Department of, 11, 84 

admission requirements, 85 

courses, 85, 86 

degree requirements, 85 
Grading system, 22 
Graduate credit for work completed 

elsewhere, 20 
Graduate study by seniors, 16 
Greek, courses in, 188 

Health Service, University, 42 
History, Department of, 12, 88 

admission requirements, 88 

courses, 91,93 

degree requirements 
Master of Arts, 88 



Master of Arts Program for 

teachers, 89 
Doctor of Philosophy, 90 
History of architecture and art, 

courses in, 189 
Housing Office, 40 

Information Engineering, Department of, 

11,95 

admission requirements, 95 

bioengineering, 96 

courses 97, 99 

Master of Science, 95 
Insurance, Hospital-Medical-Surgical, 30 

Laboratory facilities, 41 

Late registration, fine for, 30 

Latin, courses in, 191 

Leaves of absence for graduate students, 18 

Library, 39 

Linguistics, courses in, 191 

Loans, 37 

Illinois guaranteed, 38 

short-term emergency, 38 
Location and transportation, campus, 15 
Lost photo— identification— card fee, 31 

Management, courses in, 194 
Marketing, courses in, 198 
Materials Engineering, Department 
of, 11, 103 

admission requirements, 103 
courses, 105, 108 
degree requirements 
Master of Science, 104 
Doctor of Philosophy, 104 
Mathematics, Department of, 12, 111 
admission requirements, 112 
courses, 114, 119 
degree requirements 
Doctor of Philosophy, 113 
Master of Arts, Master of 
Science, 112 
Master of Science in Teaching, 1 1 2 
Music, courses in, 199 

National Science Foundation, 

traineeships, 34 

Off-quarter vacations, 19 

Organizations and activities, 43 

Petitions, 20 

Philosophy, Department of, 12, 125 

admission requirements, 125 

courses in, 126, 128 

degree requirements, 125 
Phonetic- Linguistic Research Laboratory, 41 
Physical education, courses in, 200 
Physics, Department of, 12, 130 

courses in, 132, 134 



degree requirements, 131 
Placement Services, 43 
Political Science, Department of, 12, 137 

courses in, 138, 142 

degree requirements, 137 
Probation rules, 22 
Psychology, Department of, 12, 143 

admission requirements, 143 

courses in, 145, 147 

degree requirements, 144, 145 

Quantitative Methods, courses in, 201 

Readmission, 18 
Refunds, withdrawal, 31 
Registration, 18 
Residence classification, 28 

Service fee, 29 

Social Work, Jane Addams Graduate 
School of, 12, 152 
admission requirements, 152 
courses in, 154 
degree requirements, 153 
joint programs with McCormick 

Theological Seminary, 153 
program at Chicago Circle, 154 
Sociology, Department, of, 12, 159 
admission requirements, 160 
courses in, 161, 164 
Doctor of Philosophy in, 160 
Master of Arts in, 160 
Russian, courses in, 202 

Spanish, courses in, 203 
Speech and Hearing Clinic, 42 
Speech and Theater, Department of, 

12, 165 

admission requirements, 165 

courses in, 166, 168 

degree requirements, 166 
Student affairs, 41 
Student Counseling Service, 42 
Systems engineering, courses in, 205 

Thesis, doctoral, requirements 

for, 26 
Traineeships, NSF, 34 
Transcript fee, 3 1 
Tuition and fees, 27 

deposit, 27 

residence classification for, 28 

exemptions and assessments, 28 

waiver holders, 23 
Tuition-and-fee waivers, 36 

how to apply, 36 

announcement of awards, 36 

payment of nonresident portion of, 29 

Visitor- Auditor fee, 30 

Work completed elsewhere, credit for, 20 




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